Tuesday, 28 July 2020

(425) Barton of Swinton Park, Stapleton Park, Saxby Hall and Caldy Manor

Barton of Saxby Hall etc. 
This family trace their descent from William Barton (c.1533-88) of Prestbury (Cheshire), who was claimed to have been a younger son of Andrew Barton (d. 1549) of Smithills Hall. However there is strong evidence against such a straightforward connection between the two families, since no son of this name appears in the pedigree of the Smithills branch of the family supplied to the herald's visitation of 1567 by Andrew's eldest son, Robert Barton (c.1524-80). Furthermore, the will of William Barton (d. 1588) refers to a living brother Robert, whereas Robert son of Andrew died eight years earlier. William's status seems to have been that of a yeoman, and Francis Barton (c.1555-1636), his eldest son, was described as such. His son, William Andrew Barton (1579-1658), began the process of moving his family into the gentry class by buying the Deanswater estate at Woodford in Prestbury from the 1st Viscount Savage in 1616, but he had a large family and his property was dispersed among several sons in the next generation. Deanswater passed to his youngest son, Francis Barton (1635-79), and from him to his son George Barton (d. 1723), who towards the end of his long life made it over to his son George Barton (1702-38) and moved to Stockport (Ches.). The genealogy below begins with the younger George, who had four sons. The eldest two received lands and continued to be farmers, but the younger two (George Barton (1731-89) and Henry Barton (1737-1818)) went into partnership in the burgeoning Manchester cotton trade as fustian manufacturers. It was the wealth they generated that catapulted the family into the upper echelons of Manchester society and enabled them to invest in landed property. 

Henry Barton (1737-1818) left a personal estate valued at £160,000 when he died, making him one of the richest men in Manchester. At some point late in the 18th century he purchased the Swinton Park estate in the parishes of Swinton and Pendlebury, about four miles west of the city. He evidently bought the estate from James Watson, who may have been a friend, business partner, or distant relative, for his youngest son was given the middle name Watson and three of his sons married three of the daughters of a John Watson of Preston (Lancs). The Swinton estate already included two substantial houses, known as Swinton House and Spring Wood, and Henry seems to have lived at the latter while Swinton House became the home of his eldest son, John Barton (1770-1831). John was a partner in the family firm, but was also involved for a time in Robert Owen's Chorlton Twist Co., which operated the New Lanark Mills near Glasgow until 1811. Perhaps using the capital released when this business was wound up in 1811, John purchased the Saxby Hall estate in north Lincolnshire in 1814, and he was almost certainly responsible for building a new entrance front on the house there. He seems subsequently to have divided his time between Swinton and Saxby. When he died in 1831 he left both estates to his only surviving son, John Watson Barton, who had been educated as a gentleman and was never actively involved in the cotton industry, although some of his capital may have been invested there.

Despite having inherited two estates, John Watson Barton (1798-1840) purchased a third in the 1830s. This was Stapleton Park near Pontefract in Yorkshire, which became his principal seat, while Saxby and Swinton were both let and Swinton House was sold a few months before his death. The attraction of Stapleton was almost certainly foxhunting, for the estate lay in the renowned hunting country of the Badsworth Hunt. The house was also much larger and grander than either of the places he inherited. Sadly, he did not live to enjoy the amenities of the estate for very long, and when he died at the end of 1840 his only son and heir, John Hope Barton (1833-76) was a child of seven. He was sent to Eton and Oxford, served in the local Yeomanry Cavalry, and was Master of the Badsworth for seven seasons from 1869 before dying in the hunting field at the age of forty-three, albeit of natural causes rather than an accident. Once again, the estate was in the hands of an only son who inherited as a child: indeed, Henry John Hope Barton (1873-1951) was even younger than his father had been. As he grew older, his mother engaged a tutor to prepare him for Eton and Oxford, a clergyman's son with the rather splendid name of Frank Sumner Utterton Hatchard (1861-1920). Hatchard, who had political ambitions and later tried several times to get elected to parliament, was only twelve years older than his charge and twenty years younger than his employer. Nonetheless, an attachment developed between Mrs Barton and Hatchard, and in 1887, when Henry was at the impressionable age of fourteen, they were married. One can imagine only too vividly how upsetting this home background may have been for the young man, but he seems to have survived it, took his degree from Oxford, joined the Yorkshire Dragoons and in due course came of age, married and produced a family. Either when he came of age or when he married, his mother and stepfather moved out of Stapleton Park to a substantial villa in Pontefract. Just before the First World War Henry relocated to Saxby Hall, and during the War he made Stapleton available to the Government as an emergency hospital, of which his wife acted as Commandant. When it was vacated in 1919 he sold the Stapleton estate, although in the glutted land market of the post-war years it can have realised only a fraction of its longer-term value. Henry and his family continued to live at Saxby until his death in 1951, and for a few years afterwards they retained the estate, but in 1955 it was sold.

On the death of Henry Barton (1737-1818), his own house on the Swinton Park estate, Spring Wood, passed to his youngest son, Richard Watson Barton (1788-1861), who was in business as a calico printer in Manchester. In 1832 Richard bought the manor of Caldy on the western side of the Wirral peninsula in Cheshire, which was then a remote and undeveloped property. He converted the existing 17th century farmhouse into a neo-Tudor house, which was perhaps intended at first as a holiday home. Richard was succeeded by his elder son, Richard Barton (1821-81), who was a barrister not a businessman. He sold Spring Wood in 1865 and further developed Caldy Manor as a permanent residence. His widow, who succeeded him in the estate, converted part of the house into an Anglican chapel. When she died in 1890 the estate passed to his younger brother, Alfred Barton (1824-93) and when his wife died in 1894 it passed to a first cousin once removed and her husband, Canon E.A. Waller (1836-1910), who sold it in 1906. The property was then divided, with the land being sold for suburban development, while the house remained in private ownership until the Second World War, later becoming a hospital and then a care home.

Swinton House, Swinton, Lancashire

There seems to have been a house on this site since the 17th century, and Swinton Park is marked on 18th century maps. In the late 18th century it was in the possession of James Watson, from whom it is said to have been bought by Henry Barton (1737-1818). It seems likely that James Watson was a near relation of John Watson of Preston (Lancs), three of whose daughters married Henry's sons in 1795, 1803 and 1817. When Henry acquired the estate, it already included both Swinton House and Spring Wood, and Henry himself occupied the latter. His son, John Barton (1770-1832), a Manchester cotton manufacturer 'who by his talents and industry raised himself to the highest station among the merchants of his time, and was a deputy lieutenant for the county of Lancaster', lived at Swinton House and may have remodelled the house. In 1831, the house passed to Barton's son, John Watson Barton (1798-1840), who lived in greater style at Stapleton Park (Yorks) from 1833 and rented the house out to tenants including Hugh Hornby Birley, who was in residence by 1837. 

Swinton Park: the estate as shown on the 1st edn. 6" map surveyed in 1845.

After J.W. Barton's death in 1840, his trustees sold the estate to James Atherton (d. 1876), who probably altered the house. Atherton's wife died in 1874 and between then and his own death two years later he sold the park for £16,000 to a speculative builder from nearby Eccles called Joseph Speakman, who divided it into large plots for the building of substantial villas. Some of the money from the sale of the land was applied to doing up the house, which was described in 1876 as 'a capital and picturesquely situated Family Residence, with three entertaining rooms, ten bedrooms, bathroom, two kitchens, butler's pantry, laundry, cellars, and the usual offices', and it was stated that 'the house has just been considerably altered and improved, and can be ready for occupation in two or three weeks'. Other amenities included a stable and coach-house, two cottages, and 'a good flower and kitchen garden' with a conservatory and vinery. By then, James Atherton had died, and his unmarried daughter, Eleanor Alice Maude Atherton (1843-1901) moved into the house herself and lived there until her death. Unfortunately, no photograph of the building has yet been traced.

The environs of the house became steadily more suburban in the late 19th century, and after Miss Atherton's death it stood empty until in 1904 it was leased to the City of Manchester Education Committee, which bought the freehold in 1906. They repurposed the house as a special school for disabled children, and it remained in use for this purpose until 1937, when the school was relocated to Mobberley Hall in Cheshire. By then the setting of the house had been further compromised by the construction of the East Lancashire Road, and Swinton House was demolished soon afterwards. The site was developed as a small (perhaps municipal) housing estate: Atherton Road stands on the site of the house itself.

Descent: James Watson sold to Henry Barton (1737-1818); to son, John Barton (1770-1831); to son, John Watson Barton (1798-1840) who leased it to Hugh Hornby Birley (fl. 1837-40) and sold it in 1840 to James Atherton (d. 1876); land sold for building villas, 1875 and house advertised for sale 1876 but apparently not sold and occupied by Eleanor Alice Maude Atherton (1843-1901), leased in 1904 and sold 1906 to Manchester Corporation for use as a school for disabled children which moved out in 1937; demolished soon afterwards and the site redeveloped for housing.

Stapleton Park, Darrington, Yorkshire (WR)

The estate lies between the villages of Darrington and Womersley. There was no doubt a manor house here from medieval times, but our first information about it seems to be the assessment of the house at 10 hearths for the 1672 Hearth Tax. It is shown on a county map of c.1720 as standing just north of the River Went, nearly a mile to the south of the position that it occupied by the time it next appears on a map in c.1750. It seems certain, therefore, that the house was rebuilt on the new site by Samuel Walker (1695-1754) and not, as was stated in Neale's Views of Seats, by Edward Lascelles, who bought it in 1762. The appearance of the first house on the new site does not seem to be recorded, but the 1750 map suggests that it stood in a well-timbered landscape, and Edward Lascelles talked in January 1763 about his intention to extend the park and to 'enlarge the Clumps…in front of the House - I mean to make them appear as one Wood'.

Stapleton Park: the house and park shown on a county map of 1771.
He perhaps undertook these works under the guidance of Richard Woods, who worked at the other Lascelles seats of Harewood and Goldborough at this time. He also remodelled the hall to the designs of John Carr, although it is far from clear exactly what Carr did. Masons, carvers and roofers were all employed in 1762-64, but from the surviving papers it does not sound like a complete rebuilding. What was certainly new was the staircase, which later became the avowed model for one at Campsall Hall (Yorks WR). On balance, the evidence suggests that Carr enlarged or remodelled the house built by Samuel Walker. He also did some further work later for Lord Stourton, which may have included rebuilding the stable block (characteristically Carr) as well as estate walling.


Stapleton Park: an enlargement of a view of the house which appears in the background of a painting of Edward Petre's colt 'Sir John' by J.F. Herring. The painting is dated 1822 but the view of the house must be based on an earlier drawing, for it shows the west and south sides before the Greek Revival alterations of c.1815-21.

Stapleton Park, Darrington: east front after the early 19th century alterations, from an engraving by J.P. Neale, published in 1821.


Lord Stourton was a Roman Catholic, and in about 1800 he sold Stapleton to another leading Catholic, Robert Edward Petre (1743-1801), 9th Baron Petre. In 1809 the house came to his younger son, the Hon. Edward Petre (1794-1848), and after coming of age in 1815 he undertook a further transformation of the house in the Greek Revival style, which had been completed by about 1821. An obscure designer called William Cleave of Brewer's Green, Westminster (Middx) (who appears in trade directories as a timber merchant) is recorded as making 'great alterations' and exhibited 'a south-east view of improvements made at Stapleton Park' at the Royal Academy in 1820. He seems to have enlarged the house by one bay to the south and replaced the original porch with a new entrance front and porch on the south end elevation of the Carr house. He also removed the central pediment on the west side of the house and replaced it by a smaller label on the parapet, and lowered the window sills on the ground floor of the east front. 

In 1829, the house had 'a suite of elegant apartments on the entrance floor' which consisted of a library 36x22 feet and dining room 40x27 feet separated by an ante room on the east front, and two drawing rooms hung with French silk on the west front. There was also a Catholic chapel, with a fine painting of the Crucifixion over the altar. At the same time as Cleave was altering the house, further work was done on the grounds 'under the superintendence of Mr. Payne', who has not been identified.

Stapleton Park, Darrington: the south (entrance) and west fronts of the house in about 1890.


Stapleford Park: the south and east fronts, c.1894. Image: Historic England.

Shortly before the First World War the house was let, and in 1915 it was offered to the Government as a VAD hospital, which Mrs. Barton herself managed as Commandant. The house was put up for sale by the Barton family in 1919 and was in part dispersed at auction. 

In 1921, a dismantling sale of the mansion was held and by April, when "10,000 tons of brick rubbish and dressed stone" was for sale it had evidently been demolished. The site was sold to the government in 1937, with a view to building a new mental hospital for south Yorkshire on the site, but, no doubt because the Second World War caused plans for a hospital to be abandoned, nothing was ever built here. The estate was sold off in 1958. Today only the stable block remains on the site, while one of the lodges survives as a rather forlorn diner at the Darrington service station on the A1.


Descent: Sir Robert Scargill (d.1531); to daughter, Margaret (b.1513), wife of Sir John Gascoigne of Cardington, who sold 1574 to John Conyers of London... John Savile (1556-1630), 1st Baron Savile of Pomfret; to son, Thomas Savile (1590-c.1659), 1st Earl of Sussex, who sold to James Greenwood (c.1603-70); to son James Greenwood (c.1641-1713), who sold after 1690 to Samuel Walker of York; to nephew, also Samuel Walker (1695-1754); to daughter, Elizabeth, wife of William Rawstone; her trustees sold c.1753-56 to John Boldero (1713-89); sold 1762 to Edward Lascelles (1740-1820), later 1st Earl of Harewood; rented from 1782 and sold 1789 to Charles Philip Stourton (1752-1816), 17th Baron Stourton; sold c.1800 to Robert Edward Petre (1742-1801), 9th Lord Petre; to son, Robert Edward Petre (1763-1809), 10th Baron Petre; to brother, Hon. Edward Petre (1794-1848); rented 1833 and sold 1838 to John Watson Barton (1798-1840); to son, John Hope Barton (1833-76); to son, Henry John Hope Barton (1873-1951) who sold 1919; demolished 1921.


Saxby Hall, Saxby All Saints, Lincolnshire

Saxby Hall, Saxby All Saints: the house in the 1950s.
The house turns its back on the village street and the symmetrical early 19th century entrance front with shallow two-storey bows either side of the entrance doorcase faces west across an oval lawn to a view over the vale of Ancholme. The entrance front, with its pretty veranda wrapped around the ground floor, was built for John Barton (1770-1831), but behind it is an earlier, probably 18th century house, three rooms deep and stretching back to the street. On the left is an early 19th century wing and on the right a still later wing of 1935, added for Henry John Hope Barton (1873-1951). In 1845, when the house was advertised to let, it had a dining room, drawing room, breakfast room, and seven bedrooms with dressing rooms attached, as well as service accommodation. Today, the house has an open well staircase with ramped and wreathed handrail and plain balusters, and the main rooms have moulded cornices. The estate of 2,500 acres was sold in 1955 and the house is now operated as a wedding venue.

Descent: sold 1814 to John Barton (1770-1831); to son, John Watson Barton (1798-1840); to son, John Hope Barton (1833-76); to son, Henry John Hope Barton (1873-1951); sold 1955...

Caldy Manor, Cheshire

An irregular, neo-Jacobean house of red sandstone. At the core there is said to be a 17th century farmhouse which formed the centre of the estate when it was bought by Richard Watson Barton (1788-1861) in 1832. He converted it into a substantial house for occasional use, and the initial conversion is said to have been done by Robert Bushell Rampling (perhaps a relative of his mother), but little of this is visible now after many later alterations. Barton's son, Richard Barton (d. 1881) employed W. & J. Hay to make additions in 1864, and the central room on the principal front (facing the gardens) contains plasterwork dated 1877. At the south end of the building is an irregular courtyard separated from the village street only by a stone wall, and closed on the east by a wing which was converted into a chapel by C.E. Kempe in 1882 for Richard Barton's widow Elizabeth, whose father, Sir Benjamin Heywood, was a noted church builder in Manchester. The chapel was dismantled again when a school in the village was converted into a parish church by Douglas & Minshull in 1906-07, but its tower remains. 

Caldy Manor: the house in 1905, before the Edwardian enlargement. Image: Historic England.

Caldy Manor: the garden front of the house today, after the Edwardian enlargement and later changes.
The northern end of the house was remodelled in 1907 by Sir Guy Dawber for Alexander Percy Eccles, a Liverpool cotton-broker. Dawber created a new entrance front, and added a 'Wrenaissance' style great hall and a billiard room, as well as altering some of the existing rooms. The house was separated from the estate in 1906, when the estate was bought by a company formed for the purpose, which developed Caldy as an up-market residential suburb. The house remained in private ownership until the Second World War, when it was adapted as a hospital, and the interiors were further compromised when the house was converted into a care home in 1985.

Descent: sold 1832 to Richard Watson Barton (1788-1861); to son, Richard Barton (d. 1881); to widow, Elizabeth and then to brother, Alfred Barton; to cousin, Rev. E.A. Waller, who sold 1906 to Alexander Percy Eccles... sold for conversion to hospital after WW2; sold c.1982 and converted into a care home.

Barton family of Swinton, Stapleton and Saxby


Barton, George (1702-38). Third son of George Barton (d. 1723) of Deanswater, Woodford, Prestbury (Ches.) and his wife, baptised at Prestbury, 11 August 1702. He married, 8 November 1724 at Colne (Lancs), Lucy (1696-1779), daughter of Oates Sagar of Catlow (Lancs), and had issue*:
(1) Richard Barton (1725-98), baptised at Manchester Collegiate Church, 21 September 1725; inherited the Deanswater estate from his father in 1738; married, 3 February 1766 at Wigan (Lancs) Jane Ashurst (d. 1766) but had no issue; died 15 May 1798 and was buried at Prestbury, where he and his wife are commemorated by a monument; will proved at Chester, 1798;
(2) John Barton (1730-54) (q.v.);
(3) George Barton (1731-89) (q.v.);
(4) Henry Barton (1737-1818) (q.v.);
He inherited Deanwater from his father in 1723. At his death the property passed to his eldest son.
He died between April and June 1738. His widow was buried at St Ann, Manchester, 20 July 1779.
*At least one other George Barton had children baptised in Manchester during the 1720s and 1730s, and since the registers do not normally record the names of the mothers it is not possible to be certain whether any more of these children belonged to this George Barton; it seems probable that they did.

Barton, John (1730-54). Second son of George Barton (1702-38) and his wife Lucy, daughter of Oates Sagar of Catlow (Lancs), baptised at Manchester Collegiate Church, 9 February 1729/30. He married, 28 May 1753 at Manchester Collegiate Church, Sarah (1727-1807), daughter of Jeremiah Bradshaw of Darcy Lever (Lancs), and had issue:
(1) James Barton (1754-1816), baptised at Manchester Collegiate Church, 14 July 1754; fustian manufacturer and merchant in partnership with his uncles George and Henry and later a calico printer in partnership with Thomas Stott and William Wright (Barton, Stott & Wright); inherited the Deanswater estate from his uncle Richard in 1798; married, 8 January 1787 at Manchester Collegiate Church, Dorothy Ann Nowell, and had issue two sons and two daughters; died at Hope Green, Adlington (Ches.), 6 September and was buried at Prestbury (Ches.), 10 September 1817.
He lived at Hope Green, Adlington (Ches.).
He was buried at St. Ann, Manchester, 22 August 1754. His widow died 20 May, and was buried at Manchester Cathedral, 23 May 1807; her will was proved at Chester, 14 October 1808.

Barton, George (1731-89). Third son of George Barton (1702-38) and his wife Lucy, daughter of Oates Sagar of Catlow (Lancs), baptised at Manchester Collegiate Church, 22 November 1731. Educated at Manchester Grammar School. Fustian manufacturer in Manchester, in partnership with his younger brother and nephew James. He married, 7 August 1759 at Upper Langwith (Derbys), Jane (1737-88), daughter of Rev. Michael Hartshorne, vicar of Langwith, and had issue:
(1) Susannah Barton (c.1760-61), born about 1760; died in infancy and was buried at St Mary, Manchester, 28 October 1761;
(2) Michael Barton (1761-66), baptised at St Ann, Manchester, 14 December 1761; died young and was buried at St Mary, Manchester, 10 September 1766;
(3) Lucy Barton (1763-1848), baptised at St Ann, Manchester, 17 October 1763; married, 19 November 1787 at Manchester, Thomas Stott (1759-1805) of Manchester, calico printer, and had issue five sons and three daughters; lived latterly with her son, George, at Eccleshill Hall (Yorks WR); buried at St Luke, Eccleshill (Yorks), 27 June 1848;
(4) George Barton (1765-67), baptised at St Ann, Manchester, 29 November 1765; died in infancy and was buried at St Mary, Manchester, 21 January 1767;
(5) Richard Barton (1767-71), baptised at St Ann, Manchester, 30 October 1767; died young and was buried at St Mary, Manchester, 27 September 1771;
(6) Jane Barton (b. 1770), baptised at St Ann, Manchester, 7 February 1770; probably died young;
(7) John Barton (b. 1772), baptised at St Ann, Marchester, 4 January 1772; probably died young;
(8) Sarah Barton (b. 1773), baptised at St Ann, Manchester, 16 April 1773; married 12 October 1795 at Llandeilo (Carmarthens.), Rev. Dorning Rasbotham (d. 1804), rector of St Mary, Manchester, son of Dorning Rasbotham, the Lancashire antiquarian, and had issue one son (who died young);
(9) Althea Barton (1775-1808), baptised at St Ann, Manchester, 20 March 1775; married 3 September 1792, Dr Joshua Wolstenholme Parr (1763-1810) of Liverpool and Pentre Parr, Ffarifach (Carmarthens.), chemical manufacturer, son of John Parr of Liverpool, merchant, and had issue two sons and two daughters; died at Pentre Parr, July 1808.
(10) Henry Barton (1779-1858), born 8 March and baptised at St Ann, Manchester, 8 April 1779; an officer in Royal Lancashire Militia (Capt.); lived at Carlton Hall, Carlton-in-Cleveland (Yorks NR) and Mount St John, Thirsk (Yorks NR) and later at Bebington (Ches.); married, 5 March 1801 at Tynemouth (Northbld), Margaretta (1784-1875), daughter of Thomas Tinley of North Shields (Northbld), and had issue; died in Rock Ferry (Ches.), 24 July 1858; will proved 26 January 1859 (effects under £300).
He lived in Manchester.
He died suddenly, 5 September and was buried at St Mary, Manchester, 7 September 1789; his will was proved at Chester, 23 November 1789. His wife was buried 31 January 1788.

Barton, Henry (1737-1818). Fourth son of George Barton (1702-38) and his wife Lucy, daughter of Oates Sagar of Catlow (Lancs), baptised at St Ann, Manchester, 7 November 1737. In partnership with his brother George and nephew James as fustian manufacturers in Manchester: he was one of the early cotton manufacturers and at his death left a substantial fortune. He married, 9 October 1769 at Manchester Collegiate Church, Mary (1747-1804), daughter of Joseph Bushell of Neston (Ches.), and had issue:
(1) John Barton (1770-1831) (q.v.);
(2) Mary Barton (1772-1853), baptised at Manchester Collegiate Church, 25 July 1772; married, 8 September 1794 at Manchester Collegiate Church, John Baldwin (c.1771-1821) of Ingthorpe Grange (Yorks), and had issue one son and one daughter; lived latterly at Little Burlings, Knockholt (Kent); died at Knockholt, 2 September 1853; will proved in the PCC, 22 October 1853;
(3) Henry Barton (1774-1807), baptised at Manchester Collegiate Church, 11 June 1774; cotton manufacturer in Manchester in partnership with his brother John; married, 6 September 1803 at Walton-le-Dale (Lancs), Elizabeth (b. 1782), daughter of John Watson of Preston (Lancs), and had issue one son (Henry Barton (1806-52) of Rangemore (Staffs), whose daughter Louisa Mary (1840-1919) and her husband, Canon Ernest Alured Waller (1836-1910) inherited Caldy Manor in 1894); buried at St Peter, Manchester, 3 May 1807;
(4) Richard Barton (d. 1776), probably born in 1776; died in infancy and was buried at St Mary, Manchester, 15 September 1776;
(5) Lucy Barton (1777-79), baptised at St. Ann, Manchester, 19 November 1777; died in infancy and was buried at St Mary, Manchester, 22 January 1779;
(6) Sarah Barton (1780-1868), baptised at Manchester Collegiate Church, 25 September 1780; married, 13 September 1803 at Eccles (Lancs), Robert Robinson Watson Robinson MD LRCP (1777-1866) of Preston (Lancs) and later of Swinton Park, physician, and had issue; died 25 December 1868; administration of goods granted 15 March 1869 (effects under £300);
(7) Elizabeth Barton (1783-90), baptised at Manchester Collegiate Church, 28 October 1783; died young and was buried at St Mary, Manchester, 21 November 1790;
(8) Richard Watson Barton (1788-1861) [for whom, see below, Barton family of Caldy Manor].
He purchased the Swinton House and Ward Hall estates in Lancashire 'about the end of the 18th century' and lived latterly at Spring Wood on the Swinton estate.
He died 26 October, and was buried at St Mary, Manchester, 2 November 1818; his will was proved in the PCY, 1820 (effects under £160,000). His wife was buried at St Mary, Manchester, 7 March 1804.

Barton, John (1770-1831). Eldest son of Henry Barton (1737-1818) of Swinton House, and his wife Mary, daughter of Joseph Bushell of Neston (Ches.), born 8 August and baptised at Manchester Collegiate Church, 24 August 1770. He joined the family business (Henry & John Barton & Co.) as a wholesale merchant and cotton manufacturer 'and by his talents and industry raised himself to the highest station among the merchants of his time'. From 1799 he was in partnership with his brother Henry and the philanthropist and social reformer, Robert Owen in the Chorlton Twist Co., which purchased the New Lanark Mills near Glasgow for £60,000 but was dissolved in 1811. He was a Governor of the Manchester Infirmary by 1795 and a member of the Manchester Board of Health from its inception in 1796. DL for Lancashire (from 1803). He married, 5 May 1795 at Preston (Lancs), Margaret (k/a Peggy) (1775-1823), daughter of John Watson of Preston, and had issue:
(1) William Henry Barton (b. & d. 1797), baptised at St Paul, Manchester, 19 August 1797; died in infancy and was buried at St Mary, Manchester, 29 November 1797;
(2) John Watson Barton (1798-1840) (q.v.);
(3) Mary Elizabeth Barton (1800-70), born 30 March and baptised at Manchester Collegiate Church, 11 May 1800; married, 2 October 1823, Thomas Heywood (1797-1866) of Hope End (Herefs), banker, antiquary, chairman of Worcester & Hereford Railway Co., 1840 and High Sheriff of Herefordshire, 1843, and had issue one son and two daughters; died 12 May 1870;
(4) Sophia Barton (1803-40), born 19 May 1803 and baptised at St Mary, Manchester, 19 January 1804; married, 9 April 1828 at Eccles (Lancs), Lt-Gen. Jeremiah Taylor (1789-1862) of Fern Hill House, Cropthorne (Worcs) and later of Prestbury Lodge (Glos), and had issue two sons and three daughters; buried at Lyme Regis (Dorset), 17 September 1840; administration of her goods (with will annexed) granted 25 January 1841;
(5) Margaret Barton (b. & d. 1806), born 19 March and baptised at St Mary, Manchester, 8 April 1806; died in infancy and was buried at St Peter, Manchester, 26 April 1806.
He inherited the Swinton House estate from his father in 1818 and purchased the Saxby Hall estate (Lincs) in 1814. He enlarged Saxby Hall soon afterwards.
He died 11 November and was buried at St Peter, Manchester, 19 November 1831; his will was proved in the PCY, March 1832. His wife died at Swinton, 22 February 1823 and was buried at Saxby All Saints, where she is commemorated by a memorial.

Barton, John Watson (1798-1840). Only surviving son of John Barton (1770-1831) and his wife Margaret, daughter of John Watson of Preston (Lancs), born 20 August and baptised at St Ann, Manchester, 28 November 1798. Educated at Brasenose College, Oxford (matriculated 1817; hon. MA 1821). An officer in the North Lincolnshire Yeomanry Cavalry (Lt., 1831). JP (by 1826) and DL for Lindsey and JP for West Riding of Yorkshire. He married, 28 January 1830 at St Cuthbert, Edinburgh, Juliana (c.1810-88), second daughter of James Hope WS of Moray Place, Edinburgh, and had issue:
(1) Mary Jane Barton (b. 1830), born at Swinton House, 11 November 1830 and baptised at Saxby All Saints, 11 December 1833; unmarried and living in 1871;
(2) Julia Sophia Barton (1832-1903), born 5 June 1832 and baptised at Saxby All Saints, 11 December 1833; married, 21 September 1864, Rev. Charles Augustus Hope (1827-98), rector of Barwick-in-Elmet and canon of Ripon Cathedral, youngest son of Sir John Hope of Craighall (Fife), 11th bt., and had issue two sons (of whom John Augustus Hope succeeded to the Hope family baronetcy in 1918); died at White House, Inveresk (Midl.), 1 March 1903; will confirmed at Edinburgh, 22 April 1903 (estate £6,440);
(3) John Hope Barton (1833-76) (q.v.);
(4) Margaret Barton (1835-70), baptised at Saxby All Saints, 16 September 1835; married, 8 September 1859 at Darrington (Yorks WR), Rev. Charles Warren Markham (1835-96), rector of Aughton (Lancs) and later of Saxby All Saints (who m2, 26 August 1873 at Holy Trinity, Chelsea (Middx), Elizabeth Harriet (1834-1901), daughter of Lt-Col. John Barnett, and had further issue one daughter), only son of Lt-Col. Charles Markham, and had issue four sons; died 29 November 1870;
(5) Louisa Barton (1836-1916), born 5 October and baptised at Darrington, 17 October 1836; became a Sister of Mercy in the 1870s; died at House of Mercy, Clewer, Windsor, 19 July 1916; will proved 8 September 1916 (estate £1,184);
(6) Caroline Barton (1838-1916), baptised at Darrington, 5 June 1838; married, 10 January 1867 at Darrington, William Clayton Browne (later Browne-Clayton) (1835-1907) of Browne's Hill (Co. Carlow) and had issue three sons and nine daughters; died in Dublin, 24 September 1916; will proved 23 October 1916 (estate £1,696);
(7) Frances Barton (1840-1917), baptised at Darrington, 14 May 1840; died unmarried, 5 January 1917 and was buried at Saxby All Saints.
He inherited Swinton House and Saxby Hall from his father in 1831. He leased Stapleton Park from 1833 and purchased the freehold in 1838, and sold Swinton House in 1840.
He died 22 December 1840; his will was proved in the PCC, 19 January 1842. His widow died at Harrogate (Yorks WR), 25 October 1888; her will was proved 21 December 1888 (effects £7,209).

Barton, John Hope (1833-76). Only son of John Watson Barton (1798-1840) and his wife Juliana, second daughter of James Hope WS of Moray Place, Edinburgh, born 3 October and baptised at Saxby All Saints, 11 December 1833. Educated at Eton and Christ Church, Oxford (matriculated 1852; BA 1856; MA 1864). An officer in the 1st West Yorkshire Yeomanry Cavalry (Cornet, 1853; Capt., 1861; retired 1874); JP and DL for West Riding of Yorkshire; High Sheriff of Yorkshire, 1863. Master of the Badsworth Hunt, 1869-76. The painter John Atkinson Grimshaw may have been a friend of the family as he painted a number of views in and around Stapleton Park in the 1870s. John Hope Barton married, 30 April 1872 at St Mary, Bryanston Sq., London, Florence Mary Annabella (1842-1924), daughter of Henry James Ramsden of Oxton Hall (Yorks), and had issue:
(1) Henry John Hope Barton (1873-1951) (q.v.).
He inherited Saxby Hall and Stapleton Park from his father in 1840 and came of age in 1854.
He died, apparently of a stroke, while hunting at Askern (Yorks), 20 March 1876, and St John's church, Wentbridge (Yorks WR) was erected in his memory; his will was proved 13 May 1876 (effects under £25,000). His widow married 2nd, 26 October 1887, her son's tutor, Frank Sumner Utterton Hatchard (1861-1920) of Hillthorpe, Pontefract (Yorks WR), son of Rev. Thomas Goodwin Hatchard, but had no further issue; she died 24 August and was buried at Wentbridge, 27 August 1924; her will was proved 2 February 1925 (estate £26,584).

Barton, Henry John Hope (1873-1951). Only child of John Hope Barton (1833-76) and his wife Florence Mary Annabella, daughter of Henry James Ramsden of Oxton Hall (Yorks), born in Chelsea, 25 February 1873. Educated at Eton and Christ Church, Oxford (matriculated 1890; BA c.1893). An officer in the Yorkshire Dragoons (2nd Lt., 1891; Lt. by 1895; retired 1899). JP for West Riding of Yorkshire and Lindsey; High Sheriff of Lincolnshire, 1913. Master of the Badsworth Hunt, 1905-23. He married, 27 June 1903 at Swillington (Yorks), Emma Alice OBE DGStJ (1878-1964), daughter of George William Lowther of Swillington House, and had issue:
(1) Marjorie Florence Hope Barton (1905-85), born at Stapleton Park, 6 March and baptised at Darrington (Yorks), 9 April 1905; married, 21 October 1930 at St George, Hanover Sq., London, Cdr. Thomas Stanley Fox-Pitt RN (1897-1985), second son of William Augustus Lane Lane-Fox (later Fox-Pitt), and had issue two daughters; died at Chapel Farm, Gidleigh Park (Devon), 12 August 1985; will proved 10 September 1985 (estate under £40,000);
(2) Diana Hope Barton (1907-98), born at Stapleton Park, 5 March and baptised at Darrington, 7 April 1907; died unmarried aged 91 on 28 September 1998 and was buried at Saxby All Saints; will proved 4 December 1998;
(3) John George Hope Barton (1908-56), born at Saxby Hall, 5 October and baptised at Saxby All Saints, 1 November 1908; served in Second World War as an officer in the Coldstream Guards (2nd Lt., 1940; Capt.); periodical publisher; married, 5 January 1944, Mary Alice (b. c.1905), actress, daughter of William Collins of Bottineau, North Dakota (USA) and formerly wife of Oliver Charles Wakefield (1909-56), but had no issue; died in London, 13 November 1956 and was buried at Saxby All Saints; will proved 7 December 1956 (estate £230,123);
(4) Alice Juliana Hope Barton (1911-2002), born 23 September and baptised at Saxby All Saints, 22 October 1911; died unmarried aged 91 on 11 November 2002 and was buried at Saxby All Saints;
(5) Robert Henry Hope Barton (1920-2004), born 28 October 1920; educated at Eton and Magdalene College, Cambridge; served in Second World War as an officer in the King's Royal Rifle Corps (2nd Lt., 1941; Capt.) and later a farmer at Eyston Smyths Farm, Belchamp Otten (Suffk); married, 10 January 1948 at St Paul, Knightsbridge (Middx), Diana Mary (1924-2018), daughter of Air Chief Marshal Sir (Henry) Robert Moore Brooke-Popham, and had issue one son and two daughters; died 17 January 2004 and was buried at Saxby All Saints; will proved 17 September 2004.
He inherited Saxby Hall and Stapleton Park from his father in 1876 and came of age in 1894. He sold Stapleton Park in 1919. Saxby Hall was sold after his death in 1955.
He died 20 September 1951; his will was proved 21 December 1951 (estate £50,879). His widow died 5 March 1964; her will was proved 28 July 1964 (estate £5,132).

Barton family of Caldy Manor


Barton, Richard Watson (1788-1861). Youngest son of Henry Barton (1737-1818) and his wife Mary, daughter of Joseph Bushell of Neston (Ches.), baptised at St Ann, Manchester, 29 July 1788. Calico printer in Manchester. He married, 7 October 1817 at St George, Bloomsbury (Middx), Mary, daughter of John Watson of Preston (Lancs), and had issue:
(1) Richard Barton (1821-81) (q.v.);
(2) Alfred Barton (1824-93) (q.v.). 
He inherited Spring Wood, Swinton Park, from his father in 1818 and purchased the Caldy estate on the Wirral (Ches.) in 1834 and developed an existing farmhouse into Caldy Manor.
He died 16 November and was buried at Pendlebury (Lancs), 22 November 1861; will proved 20 December 1861 (effects under £30,000). His wife's date of death is unknown.

Barton, Richard (1821-81). Elder son of Richard Watson Barton (1788-1861) and his wife Mary, daughter of John Watson of Preston (Lancs), born 25 December 1821 and baptised at St Peter, Manchester, 1 January 1822. Educated at Brasenose College, Oxford (matriculated 1840), Peterhouse, Cambridge (matriculated 1842; BA 1845; MA 1848) and the Inner Temple (admitted 1845; called to bar, 1849). Barrister-at-law. JP for Cheshire; High Sheriff of Cheshire, 1875. He married, 12 February 1850 at Eccles (Lancs), Elizabeth (1821-90), eldest daughter of Sir Benjamin Heywood of Claremont (Lancs), banker, and had issue:
(1) Reginald Heywood Barton (1850-51), born at Caldy Manor, 15 December and baptised at West Kirby (Ches.), 28 December 1850; died in infancy, Jan-Mar 1851.
He inherited Spring Wood and Caldy Manor from his father in 1861, but sold the former in 1865.
He died 17 April 1881; his will was proved 27 September and 1 December 1881 (effects £24,451). His widow died 27 January 1890; her will was proved 24 April 1890 (effects £37,650).

Barton, Alfred (1824-93). Younger son of Richard Watson Barton (1788-1861) and his wife Mary, daughter of John Watson of Preston (Lancs), baptised at St Peter, Manchester, 13 October 1824. He married, 30 July 1857 at Eccles (Lancs), Ellen (1839-94), daughter of Robert Brandt of Pendleton, barrister-at-law, but had no issue.
He inherited Caldy Manor from his elder brother in 1881. At his death it passed to his widow for life and then to his first cousin once removed, Louisa Mary (1840-1919), the wife of Canon Ernest Alured Waller (1836-1910), who sold 1906.
He died 11 May 1893; his will was proved 26 August 1893 (estate £66,192). His widow died 14 May 1894; her will was proved 30 August 1894 (effects £78,194).

Principal sources

Jones' Views of the Seats, Mansions, Castles etc. of the Noblemen and Gentlemen of England, 1829, p.29; C. Hartwell, M. Hyde, E. Hubbard & Sir N. Pevsner, The buildings of England: Cheshire, 2nd edn., 2011, pp. 199-200.

Location of archives

Barton of Saxby Hall: estate papers, chiefly for Saxby, 1855-1941 [Lincolnshire Archives, 1 Barton]

Coat of arms

Azure, on a fesse between three bucks' heads cabossed or, a martlet gules between two acorns leaved proper.

Can you help?

  • Can anyone provide or point me towards a photograph of Swinton House, or any further information about the early history of the property?
  • Can anyone provide information about the ownership history of Saxby Hall since 1955?
  • I should be most grateful if anyone can provide photographs or portraits of people whose names appear in bold above, and who are not already illustrated.
  • Any additions or corrections to the account given above will be gratefully received and incorporated. I am always particularly pleased to hear from members of the family who can supply recent personal information for inclusion.

Revision and acknowledgements

This post was first published 28 July 2020 and was updated 29 July 2020. I am most grateful to Sir Nicholas Mander, bt., for sharing his genealogical notes on this family with me, and to Lizzie of Wallwork History for advice on Swinton House.

Wednesday, 22 July 2020

(424) Barton of Holme Hall and Smithills Hall

Barton of Smithills
This family were probably raised from relatively humble origins by John Barton (d. 1491), who became a wool trader and a merchant of the English staple at Calais. This was the period of maximum prosperity for the English wool industry, and John made a great deal of money. He acquired an estate at Holme-by-Newark (Notts) and built a new house there, which is said to have had in one window the inscription 
"I thanke God, and ever shall. It is the Sheepe hath payed for all". He also largely rebuilt the parish church at Holme and made provision in his will for rebuilding the north aisle of neighbouring North Muskham church too. At Holme he provided a fine cadaver tomb to commemorate his wife and himself, which was erected in his lifetime. His son, Ralph Barton and grandson, another John Barton (d. 1517) seem also to have been wool merchants. Both men married into the Radcliffes, a leading gentry family from Lancashire, and in this way Smithills Hall near Bolton (Lancs) came into their  possession, probably on the marriage of the younger John Barton with Cecily Radcliffe in 1486. Both parties to this marriage were probably children at the time - Cecily seems to have been about thirteen - but even so it seems surprising that their eldest son and heir, Andrew Barton (c.1498-1549) was not born until more than ten years later. Cecily seems to have died in 1506, Andrew was married in about 1514 (when he would have been about sixteen), and John made over the Smithills estate to him two years later before being received into a house of Observant Friars at Richmond (Surrey), where he died the following year. It seems likely that the family were, at this time, retainers of the Earls of Derby, for Andrew's marriage was to a cadet branch of the Stanley family and the Richmond friary was one of a number of religious houses in the Richmond area which the Earls supported. Marriage and responsibility for two substantial estates no doubt disrupted Andrew's education. He entered the Middle Temple in 1517 but there is no evidence that he completed his studies, and in his will he described himself as 'not learned in the law'. With his career as a justice of the peace and member of parliament, however, it is clear that he had completed the transition from merchant to gentleman begun by his great-grandfather, and he considerably enlarged the house at Smithills Hall, turning it from a hall house into a courtyard house by the addition of two long wings. He and his wife are said to have had eleven children, but the names of only eight are known; the others probably died in infancy as they were not recorded at the 1567 visitation of Lancashire.

Smithills Hall: a view of the house in 1874. The long ranges on either side of the courtyard were added by the Barton family in the early 16th century and the chapel on the extreme right in the 1580s.

Andrew's eldest son was Robert Barton (c.1524-80), about whom little is known. His sole claim to fame is that as a justice of the peace he was responsible for the arrest of the Protestant martyr, George Marsh, in 1554. Local tradition asserts that after being questioned at Smithills, Marsh stamped his foot so hard to re-affirm his faith that a footprint was left in the stone floor, which is still shown today. This story tells us that Robert Barton adhered to the Roman Catholic faith, at least until the end of Queen Mary's reign. By contrast, his younger brother, Ralph Barton (c.1525-92) was bred to the law and under Queen Elizabeth saw a rapid rise to judicial office and other Crown appointments which must imply that he had conformed to the Protestant faith. It seems likely that this religious difference between the brothers underlay Robert's attempt to bequeath a major part of his property to his widow Margery, rather than transmitting it to Ralph as his heir male. This led to legal action by Ralph against Margery and to accusations of trespass by Margery against Ralph which were eventually resolved by a compromise negotiated in 1586 by Lord Burghley and Sir Francis Walsingham: august arbitrators indeed. Although Ralph Barton eventually secured possession of the Smithills estate, he did not enjoy it for very long, for he died in 1592 and it passed to his son and heir, Ralph Barton (1556-1611). He was educated at Grays Inn but also at Cambridge University, and was High Sheriff of Lancashire in 1605-06. When he died in 1611 he divided his property between his two sons, with Thomas receiving the Nottinghamshire estate and the younger Ralph receiving Smithills, suggesting that the former was still seems as more prestigious. Thomas was evidently resident in Nottinghamshire in 1618-19, when he was High Sheriff there and was knighted at Welbeck Abbey by King James I, and he may not have acquired Smithills until after his brother's death in 1645. His only surviving child was a daughter, Grace (d. 1658), who married the Hon. Henry Belasyse in 1627 and had two sons. She predeceased her father, on whose death the Barton properties passed to her elder son, Thomas Belasyse (d. 1700), 1st Earl Fauconberg, whose younger brother, Sir Rowland Belasyse (d. 1699) actually lived at Smithills in the late 17th century. The estate was sold by the next generation in the 1720s.


Holme Hall, Holme-by-Newark, Nottinghamshire

Holme Hall, Holme-by-Newark: the present house.
'A fair stone house' was built here by John Barton (d. 1491), a rich wool merchant, who  gave thanks for his blessings with the line
"I thanke God, and ever shall. It is the Sheepe hath payed for all" which is recorded to have been inscribed in one of the windows. The property descended in the Barton family to Sir Thomas Barton (d. 1659), and then passed through his only daughter to the Belasyse family. It seems to have declined into a farmhouse in the 18th century, and was demolished and replaced in about 1800 by the present five bay, two-and-a-half storey house in red brick, with a hipped slate roof. By the later 19th century the Dukes of Newcastle had become the principal landowners at Holme, and this house was perhaps built by them, either for a gentleman farmer tenant or for rental to a gentry occupier like Charles Cane of Southwell, who was living here in 1891. The house has a three-bay, three storey rear extension and is now privately owned, but offers bed and breakfast accommodation. The previous house seems not to be recorded, either in views or on estate maps, but it would be most interesting to know something of its appearance.

Descent: John Barton (d. 1491); to son, Ralph Barton (d. by 1505); to son, John Barton (d. 1517); to son, Andrew Barton (c.1498-1549); to son, Robert Barton (c.1524-80); to brother, Ralph Barton (c.1525-92); to son, Ralph Barton (1556-1611); to son, Sir Thomas Barton (c.1583-1659); to grandson, Thomas Belasyse (d. 1700), 1st Earl Fauconberg...

Smithills Hall, Bolton, Lancashire

An account of this house was published in this earlier post.

Barton family of Holme Hall and Smithills Hall


John Barton (d. 1491) from his
monument at Holme. 

Barton, John (d. 1491).
Parentage unknown. A wool merchant of the Calais staple and vintner. He paid for the rebuilding of Holme church in about 1485 and left money in his will for rebuilding the north aisle of North Muskham church. He married Isabella ?Gernon, and had issue:
(1) Ralph Barton (d. by 1505) (q.v.);
(2) Thomas Barton (fl. 1491); an executor of his father's will, by which he received 100 marks;
(3) Robert Barton (fl. 1491); evidently an Augustinian canon at Shelford Priory (Notts); received a bequest of 40 marks from his father;
(4) Richard Barton (fl. 1491); inherited 100 marks from his father and lands and tenements in Newark, Northgate and Osmundthorpe (Notts);
(5) Katherine Barton;
(6) Isabella Barton; married John Tamworth.
He acquired or inherited the manor of Holme-by-Newark (Notts) and built a new house there.
He died early in 1491 and was buried at Holme, where he and his wife are commemorated by a cadaver tomb; his will (dated 10 December 1490), was proved at York, 13 June 1491. His wife's date of death is unknown.

Barton, Ralph (d. by 1505). Eldest son of John Barton (d. 1491) and his wife Isabella ?Gernon. Wool merchant. He married, c.1467, Joan, daughter and co-heir of Sir Ralph Radcliffe of Radcliffe and Smithills (Lancs), and had issue:
(1) John Barton (d. 1517) (q.v.);
(2) Henry Barton;
(3) Elizabeth Barton; married Thomas Ardern;
(4) Stephen Barton;
(5) Christopher Barton; married Joan Molyneux (d. 1528) and had issue.
He inherited the Holme Hall estate from his father in 1491.
He was living in 1491, when he was an executor of his father's will, but died before 1505. His widow was living in 1505, but her date of death is unknown.

Barton, John (d. 1517). Eldest son of Ralph Barton (b. c.1445) and his wife Johanna Radcliffe, born about 1468? Wool merchant. On 12 July 1516 he retired from the world and entered the community of the Observant Friars at Richmond (Surrey), and was there professed. He married, 1486 (settlement 6 October), Cecily (c.1473?-1506), daughter of Ralph Radcliffe, and had issue including:
(1) Andrew Barton (c.1498-1549) (q.v.).
(2) Rev. Alexander Barton (d. 1568?), clerk in holy orders; probably the man who was vicar of Coldrede (Kent), by 1540 and later rector of Hunton (Kent), and died in 1568;
(3) Leonard Barton; died young;
(4) Francis Barton; died without issue.
He inherited the Holme estate near Newark from his father and Smithills Hall in right of his wife. In 1516, he settled his property on his son Andrew and became a friar.
He died early in 1517; an inquisition post mortem was held 2 April 1517. His wife died is said to have died in 1506.

Barton, Andrew (c.1498-1549). Eldest son of John Barton (d. 1517) and his wife Cecily, daughter of Ralph Radcliffe of Smithills Hall (Lancs), born about 1498. Educated at New Inn and Middle Temple (admitted 1517) and apparently later attached to the Inner Temple, but in his will described himself as 'not learned in the law'. MP for Lancashire, 1529; JP for Lancashire (by 1529) and Nottinghamshire, 1537-43.  He was named as a Commissioner for Tenths of Spiritualities in Nottinghamshire, 1535, and for the Subsidy in Lancashire, 1541 and 1543. In 1547 he received a general pardon. He married, c.1514, Anne alias Agnes (d. 1530), daughter of Sir William Stanley of Hooton (Ches.) and had issue seven sons and four daughters including*:
(1) Robert Barton (c.1524-80) (q.v.);
(2) Ralph Barton (1525-92) (q.v.);
(3) Henry Barton; died without issue and probably young;
(4) Thurston Barton (d. by 1578); married Anne (who m2, 5 August 1578 at Leigh (Lancs), Nicholas Starkie of Huntroyd), daughter of John Parr of Kempnall and Cleworth Hall (Lancs); died before 1578;
(5) Cecily Barton (fl. 1549); married, 1542 (contract 2 June), Robert Holt (fl. 1556) of Stubley (Lancs), gent., and had issue;
(6) Margaret Barton (d. by 1568); married, as his first wife, John Westby (c.1518-91) of Mowbreck Hall, Preston (Lancs); died before 1568;
(7) Dorothy Barton (b. c.1529); married, 1567?, Sir William Gerard (c.1525-81), kt., judge, MP for Chester, 1555-72, Lord Chancellor of Ireland and Dean of St Patrick's Cathedral, Dublin (though he was not a clergyman), 1576-81, and had issue two sons and four daughters; living in 1581;
(8) Eleanor Barton (d. 1565); married, c.1554, Edward Singleton (1511-67) of Broughton Tower (Lancs), and had issue including five sons (two of whom became Jesuit priests); died 13 December 1565.
He was given the Smithills Hall estate by his father in 1516, and purchased additional manors and lands, including  Ramsgreave in Blackburn (Lancs) (formerly a property of Whalley Abbey) in 1540 and the manor of Oswaldtwistle, 1548. He sold Salford Hall (Lancs) in 1540.
He died 14 March 1548/9 and was buried at Bolton (Lancs); his will was proved at Chester in 1548/9. His wife died in 1530.
* Some sources also list a daughter, Sibell Barton (d. 1584) and a son, William Barton (c.1533-88), but they are not mentioned in the pedigree which Robert Barton provided to the 1567 visitation and were almost certainly not John's children as William's will of 1588 mentions a brother Robert then living.

Barton, Robert (c.1524-80). Eldest son of Andrew Barton (c.1498-1549) and his wife Anne alias Agnes, daughter of Sir William Stanley of Hooton (Ches), born about 1524. Probably remained a Roman Catholic. JP for Lancashire, in which capacity he was responsible for the arrest of the Protestant martyr, George Marsh, in 1554. He married*, c.1568, Margery (d. 1592), daughter of Sir Piers Legh of Bradley (Lancs), and had issue:
(1) Margaret Barton; died unmarried.
He inherited Smithills Hall from his father in 1549. At his death his widow inherited some of his property for life, but her possession of it was disputed by her brother-in-law, who entered the manor, dug coal there and made gifts of trees to third parties; the matter was settled by arbitration in 1586.
He died 10 September 1580. His widow married 2nd, Sir Richard Shuttleworth (c.1541-99) of Grays Inn and Gawthorpe Hall (Lancs), and died in 1592; administration of her goods was granted 9 May 1592.
* Some sources mention an earlier marriage to a Miss Shuttleworth, but I have found no evidence for this and it is probably a confusion arising from his widow's second marriage.

Barton, Ralph (1525-92). Second son of Andrew Barton (c.1498-1549) and his wife Anne alias Agnes, daughter of Sir William Stanley of Hooton (Ches), born 1525. Educated at Grays Inn (admitted 1542; called 1545; reader 1559, 1568; bencher, 1569). Barrister at law. MP for Wigan, 1558 and for Nottingham, 1563, 1571; Queen's Feodary in Nottinghamshire by 1560; Queen's attorney on the North Wales Circuit, 1563; Queen's Serjeant, 1564; Recorder of Nottingham, 1564-c.1582; Member of the Council for the Marches of Wales, 1570; JP for Nottinghamshire (by 1559), Herefordshire, Shropshire (by 1579) and Lancashire (by 1587). He had probably conformed to the Protestant religion by 1560. He married, 1555 (licence 14 June), Eleanor, daughter of Sir Robert Brereton and widow of [forename unknown] Brackenbury, and had issue nine children, including:
(1) Ralph Barton (1556-1611) (q.v.);
(2) Anne Barton (d. 1622); married Sir William Fleetwood (1563-1630) of Great Missenden (Bucks), MP for Preston, 1584, Poole, 1586 and Buckinghamshire, 1604-28, and had issue seven sons and seven daughters; buried at Great Missenden, 13 March 1621/2.
He disputed his sister-in-law's possession of the family's property, and the matter was settled in 1586 by the arbitration of Lord Burghley and Sir Francis Walsingham: the Smithills and Blackburn estates were listed among his possessions in his inquisition post mortem. 
He died 18 March 1591/2 and was buried at Holme (Notts); his will was proved 3 June 1592. His wife's date of death is unknown.

Barton, Ralph alias Randle (1556-1611). Elder son of Ralph Barton (1525-92) and his wife Eleanor Brereton, born 1556. Educated at Nottingham, Grays Inn (admitted 1573) and Caius College, Cambridge (admitted 1575). JP for Lancashire by 1600; High Sheriff of Lancashire, 1605-06. He married*, and had issue:
(1) Sir Thomas Barton (c.1583-1659), kt. (q.v.);
(2) Ralph Barton (d. 1645); married, 18 December 1612 at Bolton (Lancs), Elizabeth (d. 1620?), daughter of John Wood of Turton but apparently had no issue; buried at Bolton, 21 January 1644/5;
(3) Marie Barton (d. 1603); died unmarried and was buried at Bolton, 22 November 1603;
(4) Frances Barton (d. 1608); died unmarried and was buried at Bolton, 20 October 1608;
(5) Jane Barton (fl. 1615-24); married, before 1615, as his second wife, Francis Burdett (1578-1637) of Birthwaite (Yorks) and had issue four sons and two daughters.
He inherited Smithills Hall from his father in 1592. At his death he had settled his Nottinghamshire estate on his elder son and his Lancashire estate on his younger son, with remainder to his elder son.
He died at Smithills, 10 December 1611, and was buried at Bolton (Lancs) the following day; his will was proved 2 January 1611/2 and an inquisition post mortem was held 15 April 1612. His widow is probably the 'ould Mrs Barton' buried at Bolton, 3 January 1632/3.
* Some sources state he married Elizabeth, daughter of John Wood of Turton, but this was his son and namesake.

Barton, Sir Thomas (c.1583-1659), kt. Elder son of Ralph alias Randle Barton (1556-1611) and his wife Elizabeth, born about 1583. Educated at Queens' College, Cambridge (admitted 1599). JP for Lancashire (by 1616); High Sheriff of Nottinghamshire, 1618-19. He was knighted at Welbeck Abbey, 13 August 1619. A commissioner for the subsidy of 1622. Governor of Blackburn Grammar School. He married, 20 October 1607 at Ossington (Notts), Christiana (1586-1623), daughter of William Cartwright of Ossington, and had issue:
(1) Grace Barton (c.1610-58); married, 1626/7 (settlement 4 January), Henry Belasyse (1604-47), MP for Thirsk, 1625-26 and for Yorkshire, 1628, 1640-44, son of Sir Thomas Belasyse (1577-1652), 2nd bt., 1st Baron Fauconberg and 1st Viscount Fauconberg, and had issue seven sons and seven daughters; died 7 January 1658;
(2) An unnamed child (b. & d. 1623); buried at Bolton 12 July 1623.
He inherited Smithills Hall from his younger brother in 1645. At his death it passed to his grandson, Thomas Belasyse (d. 1700), 1st Earl Fauconberg, but was occupied by his younger brother, Sir Rowland Belasyse (d. 1699).
He died 17 July and was buried at Bolton (Lancs), 17 August 1659. His wife died following childbirth, and was buried at Bolton, 17 July 1623.

Principal sources

J. Throsby, Thoroton's History of Nottinghamshire, 1797, vol. 3, pp. 153-60; VCH Lancashire, vol. 5, 1911, pp. 12-20; Sir N. Pevsner & E. Williamson, The buildings of England: Nottinghamshire, 2nd edn., 1979, p. 145; Hartwell, Hyde & Pevsner, The buildings of England: Lancashire - Manchester and the south-east, 2004, pp. 169-72; Sir John Baker, The men of court, 1440-1550, vol. 1, 2012, pp. 274-75;
History of Parliament biographies of Andrew Barton (d. 1549) and Ralph Barton (1525-92).

Location of archives

Barton family of Smithills: photocopies of pedigrees, transcripts, terrier, survey and rental of lands etc., 1491-1815 [Nottinghamshire Archives, DD/1609]

Coat of arms

Azure, a fess between three stags' heads cabooshed or, in fess point a mullet, sable.

Can you help?

  • Can anyone provide more information about the ownership history of Holme Hall after 1700, or any illustration of the Barton family's house there?
  • I should be most grateful if anyone can provide photographs or portraits of people whose names appear in bold above, and who are not already illustrated.
  • Any additions or corrections to the account given above will be gratefully received and incorporated. I am always particularly pleased to hear from members of the family who can supply recent personal information for inclusion.

Revision and acknowledgements

This post was first published 22 July 2020. I am most grateful for the assistance of Sir Nicholas Mander, bt. with the genealogy of this family.

Thursday, 16 July 2020

(423) Barton of Grove, Clonelly, The Waterfoot, Straffan House and Rochestown Castle - part 2

This post is divided into two parts: Part 1 includes the introduction to the family and the descriptions of the houses they built. This part contains the biographical and genealogical details of the owners.

Barton family of The Grove


'French Tom' Barton (1694-1780) 
Barton, Thomas (1694-1780). 
Eldest son of William Barton (1658-1729) and his wife Elizabeth, daughter of John Dickson of Ballyshannon, born 21 December 1694. He travelled in the Mediterranean area before settling in Bordeaux, where he founded a wine export business in 1725. B
y 1747, he was the single largest shipper of Bordeaux wines. In 1756 he was selected to head a delegation of negociants, and ever since the firm has been one of the leading wine exporters in Bordeaux; the business remained in family control until the 1980s. He married, 1 November 1722 at Ballyshannon (Co. Donegal), his cousin Margaret (d. 1775), youngest daughter of Robert Delap of Ballyshannon, and had issue:
(1) William Barton (1723-93) (q.v.).
He inherited part of Boa Island in Lough Erne from an uncle and the adjoining property of Curraghmore from his father. He purchased the Grove estate of some 2,650 Irish acres at Fethard (Co. Tipperary) in 1751 and 1757 for £30,500, and also bought further land in Co. Fermanagh and Co. Leitrim. However, he spent very little time in Ireland and lived chiefly at the Chateau Le Boscq, St. Estephe (France), which he rented from 1749.
He died at Bordeaux, 18 October 1780. His wife died 27 January 1775.

Barton, William (1723-93). Only child of Thomas Barton (1694-1780) and his wife Margaret, youngest daughter of Robert Delap of Ballyshannon, born 5 August 1723. "A man whose acrimonious character caused numerous disagreements both inside and outside of the family circle". In 1772 he fought a famous duel over a contest to elect the 'Sovereign' of Fethard to Parliament, and was wounded in the thigh. He married, 1 August 1754, Grace (c.1731-1808), eldest daughter of Very Rev. Charles Massy of Doonas (Co. Clare), Dean of Limerick, and had issue:
(1) Thomas Barton (1757-1818) (q.v.);
(2) William Barton (1758-1835) [see below, Barton family of Clonelly];
(3) Lt-Gen. Charles Barton (1760-1819) [see below, Barton family of The Waterfoot];
(4) Grace Barton (1762-1844), born 21 March 1762; married, 1784, John Palliser (1760-1833) of Derryluskan (Co. Tipperary), and had issue three sons and four daughters; died in Dublin, 13 March 1844;
(5) Elizabeth Barton (1764-1852), born 25 July 1764; married, 15 February 1796, Lt-Gen. Sir Augustine Fitzgerald (d. 1834), 1st bt., of Newmarket-on-Fergus (Co. Clare), but had no issue; died in Dublin, 8 May 1852; will proved in Dublin, 1852;
(6) Hugh Massy Barton (1766-1854) [see below, Barton family of Straffan House];
(7) Gen. Sir Robert Barton (1768-1853), born 26 July 1768; army officer, first with the National Guard in France in 1790 and later in the 2nd Life Guards (Ensign, 1794; Lt., 1794; Capt., 1796; Maj., 1803; Lt-Col., 1805; Col. 1813; Maj-Gen., 1819; Lt-Gen. 1837; Gen. 1851); appointed KB and KCH, 1837; married 1st, 8 February 1802 at St Helen, York (Yorks), Mary Ann (1777-1821), daughter and co-heiress of William Paynter, and had issue one son and two daughters; married 2nd, 11 June 1834 at St Mary, Bryanston Sq., London, Marion Colette (1792-1875), daughter of John Addison and widow of Col. John McPherson, and had further issue one daughter; died in London, 17 March 1853;
(8) Dunbar Barton (1769-1848) [see below, Barton family of Rochestown];
(9) Margaret Everina Barton (1772-1820), born 4 November 1772; married, 12 March 1792 at Portpatrick (Wigtowns.), Hugh Massy (1761-1812), 3rd Baron Massy, and had issue four sons and five daughters; died 14 September 1820.
He was bequeathed a life tenancy of Grove but his father bequeathed the freehold to his eldest son.
He died while under house arrest in Bordeaux, 29 October 1793. His widow was buried at St. Lawrence-in-Thanet (Kent), 21 September 1808.

Barton, Thomas (1757-1818). Eldest son of William Barton (1723-93) and his wife Grace, eldest daughter of Very Rev. Charles Massy of Doonas (Co. Clare), Dean of Limerick, born 26 January 1757. Educated at Middle Temple (admitted 1777). A freeman and burgess of Fethard, 1780-95, 1801-09 (Sovereign (ie Mayor), 1787-88, 1791-92, 1801-02, 1811-14); MP for Fethard in the Irish Parliament, 1783-97; Recorder of Fethard, 1801-09; Town Clerk of Fethard, 1801-06; High Sheriff of Co. Tipperary, 1785-86; Captain of the Fethard Cavalry, 1796; Governor of the Hibernian Marine Society, 1775-79. He married, November 1786 at Kilcooley Abbey, Mary (b. c.1760; fl. 1818), daughter of Chambré Brabazon Ponsonby MP of Ashgrove and sister of Chambré Brabazon Ponsonby-Barker of Kilcooley Abbey (Co. Tipperary), and had issue including:
(1) Thomas Barton (b. c.1789), born about 1789; educated at Kilkenny School (admitted 1797), but presumably predeceased his father;
(2) William Barton (1790-1857) (q.v.);
(3) Mary Barton (c.1792-1866), born about 1792; married, 8 September 1834 at Celbridge (Co. Kildare), George FitzGerald (1809-53), only son of Lord Robert Stephen FitzGerald and grandson of Lt-Gen. James Fitzgerald, 1st Duke of Leinster, but had no issue; died 25 January and was buried at Cheltenham (Glos), 30 January 1866;
(4) Lt-Col. Chambré Brabazon (k/a Chum) Barton (c.1794-1834), born about 1794; an officer in 2nd Life Guards (Cornet, 1812; Lt. 1814; Capt. 1818; Maj., 1825; Lt-Col., 1825; retired 1826), who was present at the Battle of Waterloo; died 1834;
(5) Grace Barton (c.1796-1864), born about 1796; married 1st, 1816, as his second wife, Lt-Col. Kingsmill Pennefather (1782-1819), eldest son of Lt-Col. Richard Pennefather MP of New Park, Cashel (Co. Tipperary) and had issue two daughters; married 2nd, before 1832, Maj. Michael Angelo Galliazzi, of the Austrian army, and lived in Florence (Italy); died at Berne (Switzerland), 27 August 1863; administration of her goods granted to her daughter, 8 March 1864 (effects under £3,000);
(6) Catherine Barton (c.1800-43), born about 1800; married, 1821, Edmund Staples (c.1799-1863) of Dunmore (Co. Leix), High Sheriff of Co. Leix in 1842; died 24 December 1843;
(7) Maj. Charles Robert Barton (c.1806-62), born about 1806; an officer in the 14th Light Dragoons (Cornet, 1825; Lt., 1828; Capt. 1833; Maj. 1838; retired 1842); died unmarried in London, 6 February 1862; will proved 12 April 1862 (effects under £5,000).
He inherited the Grove estate from his grandfather in 1780.
He died at Cheltenham (Glos) in August or September 1818. His wife was living in 1818; her date of death is unknown.

Barton, William (1790-1857). Eldest son of Thomas Barton (1757-1818) and his wife Mary, daughter of Chambré Brabazon Ponsonby MP of Ashgrove, born 21 June 1790. Educated at Kilkenny School. JP and DL for Co. Tipperary; High Sheriff of Co. Tipperary, 1825; six times 'Sovereign' (ie Mayor) of Fethard between 1816 and 1830. He was a keen foxhunter and kept a private pack of hounds until in 1820 he founded The Grove Hunt, which became known as the Tipperary Foxhounds after he sold the pack in the 1830s. He married, 21 April 1815, Catherine (c.1795-1872), eldest daughter of Samuel Perry of Woodrooff, Clonmel (Co. Tipperary), and had issue:
(1) Thomas Barker Barton (1816-71) (q.v.);
(2) Samuel Henry Barton (1817-91) (q.v.);
(3) Deborah Barton (c.1819-75), born about 1819; married, May 1839, John Wade (1811-89) of St. Canice's Cottage, Kilkenny, high sheriff of city of Kilkenny, 1853, younger son of William Blaney Wade of Clonebraney (Co. Meath), and had issue two sons and one daughter; died 24 March 1875;
(4) William Hugh Barton (1820-96), born 1820; an officer in the 76th Foot (Ensign, 1839; Lt., 1843; retired as Capt., 1851); married, before 1852 on Paxos (Greece), Mary, second daughter of Capt. Robert Blakeney of the Island of Paxos, and had issue five sons and four daughters; died at Youghal (Co. Cork), 14 October 1896; will proved 5 December 1896 (effects £39);
(5) Mary Frances Barton (c.1821-65), born about 1821; married, 14 October 1845 at Fethard, Charles Shaw QC (1817-70), youngest son of Col. Sir Robert Shaw MP, 1st bt., of Bushy Park (Co. Dublin), and had issue four sons and two daughters; died 17 March 1865;
(6) Catherine (k/a Kate) Grace Barton (1823-1902), born 1823; married, 19 June 1852, her brother-in-law, Lt-Col. Sir Robert Shaw (1821-95), 4th bt., of Bushy Park, and had issue one son; died at Pau (France), 15 December 1902; will proved 27 February 1903 (estate £602);
(7) Anne Margaret Barton (c.1825-1915), born about 1825; married, 7 December 1864 at Fethard, as his fourth wife, George Gough (1802-89) of Rathronan (Co. Tipperary) but had no issue; died 22 January 1915; will proved 20 March 1915 (estate £2,703);
(8) Emily Martha Barton (c.1829-1914), born about 1829; lived latterly with her sister at Rathronan; died 28 May 1914; will proved 27 June 1914 (estate £1,399).
He inherited the Grove estate from his father in 1818.
He died 7 February 1857. His widow died 6 April 1872.

Barton, Thomas Barker (1816-71). Eldest son of William Barton (1790-1857) and his wife Catherine, eldest daughter of Samuel Perry of Woodrooff, Clonmel (Co. Tipperary), born 1816. Educated at Harrow. JP for Co. Tipperary and a regular member of the Grand Jury for that county. He was unmarried and without issue.
He inherited the Grove estate from his father in 1857, and at his death it passed to his brother, Samuel. T.B. Barton leased the house to tenants including William Heffernan (fl. 1868).
He was accidentally drowned in a small river on his demesne, 21 February 1871, but curiously no inquest seems to have been held; his will was proved 16 August 1871 (effects under £8,000).

Barton, Samuel Henry (1817-91). Second son of William Barton (1790-1857) and his wife Catherine, eldest daughter of Samuel Perry of Woodrooff, Clonmel (Co. Tipperary), born 26 October 1817. Educated at Harrow, 1831-35, and Trinity College, Dublin (admitted 1836). JP and DL for Co. Tipperary; High Sheriff of Co. Tipperary, 1888-89. He was a member of the Provisional Committee of the Clonmel and Thurles Railway, 1863. He married, 23 December 1862 in St. Luke, Cheltenham (Glos), Mary Elizabeth (1837-1927), only daughter of Maj. Thomas Frobisher of Cheltenham, and had issue:
(1) William Henry Hugh Barton (1871-1931), born 26 February 1871 and baptised in Cheltenham, 1 May 1871; lived in Liverpool but emigrated to New Zealand, 1916; married, 3 March 1893 at Cheltenham, Kathleen (k/a Kate) (c.1869-1955), metal finisher, daughter of Joseph Davenport of Birmingham, book-keeper; died 12 April 1931 and was buried at St John, Trentham, Wellington, New Zealand;
(2) Rose Catherine Florence Barton (1872-1947), born 9 August 1872; lived at Leckhampton (Glos); died unmarried, 15 September 1947; will proved January 1948 (estate £9,948);
(3) Charles Robert Barton (1877-1955) (q.v.).
He inherited the Grove estate (5,119 acres in 1878) from his elder brother in 1871. At his death it passed to his widow for life, and then to his second son. He and his wife moved to her family home at 15 Lansdown Place, Cheltenham in about 1890, and Grove was let to Richard Burke MFH until c.1917.
He died in Cheltenham, 27 October 1891 and was buried at Cheltenham Cemetery; his will was proved 6 May 1892 (effects £1,874). His widow died 26 January 1927 and was buried in Cheltenham Cemetery; her will was proved March 1927 (estate £8,172).

Barton, Charles Robert (1877-1955). Second son of Samuel Henry Barton (1817-91) and his wife Mary Elizabeth, only daughter of Maj. Thomas Frobisher of Cheltenham (Glos), born 4 March and baptised at St Mary, Cheltenham, 20 April 1877. Educated privately. He served as a trooper in 3rd Paget's Horse unit of the Imperial Yeomanry and in the Royal Dublin Fusiliers (2nd Lt., 1901; Capt. 1915) in the Boer War and First World War. JP and DL (from 1919) for County Tipperary. He married, 15 October 1904 at Clonmel (Co. Tipperary), Ethel Mary (1876-1935), daughter of Capt. George Edward Cobden of Raheen, Clonmel (Co. Tipperary), but had no issue.
He inherited the Grove estate from his mother in 1927, but was resident from about 1919. At his death it passed to his kinsman, Henry Jeffrey Ponsonby (1930-2018).
He died 8 December 1955; his will was proved in Dublin, 23 May 1956 (estate £37,140). His wife died at Grove, 15 May 1935; her will was proved in Dublin, 14 November 1935 (estate £7,493).

Barton family of Clonelly


Barton, William (1758-1835). Second son of William Barton (1723-93) and his wife Grace, eldest daughter of Very Rev. Charles Massy of Doonas (Co. Clare), Dean of Limerick, born 20 August 1758. An officer in his father's troop of Irish Volunteers; High Sheriff of County Fermanagh, 1787. A Governor of the Fermanagh Infirmary. He is said to have been 'a modest man, of simple tastes' and rather scholarly. He married, 6 July 1796 at St Anne, Dublin, Anne Isabella (1765-1810), daughter of Folliott Warren of Lodge (Co. Kilkenny) and had issue, possibly among others:
(1) William Thomas Barton (1797-1818), born in 1797; educated at Trinity College, Dublin (admitted 1812; BA 1817) and Kings Inns, Dublin (admitted 1816); died 1818;
(2) Folliott Warren Barton (1798-1870) (q.v.);
(3) Thomas Robert Barton (c.1800-27), an officer in the Madras Army (Lt, 1818); died at Bangalore (India), 26 May 1827;
(4) Samuel Dunbar Barton (c.1801-19), an officer in the Madras Army (Cadet 1817); died in camp at Nagpore (India), 12 March 1819;
(5) Hugh Barton (c.1805-28), baptised at St Peter, Dublin, 15 January 1805; educated at Trinity College, Dublin (admitted 1821; BA 1827); died unmarried, 19 January 1828;
(6) Edward George Barton (1806-37), born 10 August 1806; educated at Trinity College, Dublin (admitted 1824; BA 1828; MA 1832), Grays Inn (admitted 1832) and Kings Inns, Dublin (admitted 1831; called 1835); barrister-at-law; died unmarried, 3 February 1837.
He inherited Clonelly from his grandfather in 1780, and built a new house there c.1805.
He died 18 May 1835. His wife died, probably in childbirth, 13 April 1810.

Barton, Folliott Warren (1798-1870). Second son of William Barton (1758-1835) and his wife Anne Isabella, daughter of Folliott Warren of Lodge (Co. Kilkenny), born 15 September 1798. JP and DL for Co. Fermanagh; High Sheriff of Co. Fermanagh, 1834. On 31 October 1845 he was severely injured while riding home from visiting his cousin at The Waterfoot when he was shot by an gunman lying in ambush on his road. A modern analysis of the case shows the motive for the crime to have been resentment of Barton's predatory sexual behaviour by the male relative of one of the mistresses he took from the local population. The combination of the community's desire to shield the perpetrator and the gentry's desire to hush up the scandal meant that attempts to investigate the crime were frustrated, and no one was ever convicted. The investigation was misdirected as the crime was thought to be an anti-landlord atrocity, one of many in the area at the time. He was unmarried but had issue by his mistresses:
(X1) Hugh Barton (1834-1902) (q.v.); 
(X2) Thomas Barton (1837-98) (q.v.); 
(X3) Edward Barton (1848-85) (q.v.). 
He inherited Clonelly from his father in 1835. At his death it passed to his youngest illegitimate son.
He died 28 September 1870 and was buried at Carne (Co. Donegal); his will was proved in Dublin, 20 February 1871 (effects under £10,000).

Barton, Edward (1848-85). Youngest illegitimate son of Folliott Warren Barton (1798-1870) and his mistress, born 17 August 1848. An officer in the 27th Inniskilling Fusiliers (Ensign, 1867; Lt. 1871; Capt. 1878); JP for Co. Fermanagh and (from 1875) Co. Donegal. He was unmarried and without issue.
He inherited Clonelly from his father in 1870.
He died in London, 10 April 1885. His will was proved in Dublin, 6 November 1885 (estate £22,787), after a sensational conspiracy case in which a group of his friends (including a magistrate - who was jailed for six months - and the local rector - who committed suicide) were accused of attempting to defraud the estate of £12,000.

Barton, Hugh (1834-1902). Eldest illegitimate son of Folliott Warren Barton (1798-1870) and his mistress, born 1834. Emigrated to New Zealand by 1871, when he applied for a licence to mine gold, but by 1880 had moved to Colorado (USA). He became an American citizen in 1880, but returned to Ireland on inheriting the Clonelly estate from his younger brother in 1885, and was renaturalised as a British citizen, 12 January 1893. JP for Co. Fermanagh (from 1892); High Sheriff of Co. Fermanagh, 1898-99. He married 1st, before 1857, Rebecca Burnside, and 2nd, 14 June 1883 at Fort Collins, Colorado (USA), Emma Lila Gibson (1845-1901), and had issue:
(1.1) Alice Barton (b. 1857), baptised at Carn RC church (Co. Donegal), 2 June 1857; married, c.1875 (div. by 1880) [forename unknown] McBride.
He inherited Clonelly from his younger brother in 1885.
He died 10 August 1902 and was buried at Carne (Co. Donegal). His first wife died before 1880. His second wife died 26 March 1901.

Barton, Thomas (1837-98). Second illegitimate son of Folliott Warren Barton (1798-1870) and his mistress, born 1837. Emigrated to Australia before his father's death. He married, 11 December 1875 at Toogong, New South Wales (Australia), Anne Irvine (1841-1910) and had issue:
(1) Folliott Warren Barton (1876-1922) (q.v.); 
(2) Ann Isabella Barton (1878-1950), born 1878; married, 31 August 1926 at Old Homestead, Lowery, New South Wales, George Hamilton (1877-1968), but had no issue; died 30 November 1950 and was buried at Toogong, New South Wales; administration of goods granted 7 February 1951;
(3) William Hugh Barton (b. & d. 1880), born at Molong, New South Wales, 1880; died in infancy and was buried there, 1880.
He died 1 January 1898 at Clonelly, Murga, New South Wales (Australia) and was buried at Toogong. His widow died at Cudal near Orange, New South Wales, 13 April 1910 and was also buried at Toogong; her will was proved in Armagh, 8 December 1910 (effects £20).

Barton, Folliott Warren (1876-1922). Only surviving son of Thomas Barton (1837-98) and his wife Anne Irvine, born at Murga, New South Wales, 2 September 1876. Educated at Cudal, New South Wales, and privately. Farmed in Australia until 1902, when he moved to Ireland after inheriting the Clonelly estate on the death of his uncle. An officer in North of Ireland Horse (2nd Lt., 1904; retired 1908); JP for Co. Fermanagh by 1903; a freemason from 1903; High Sheriff of Co. Fermanagh, 1905. He went out to Australia again to marry, 18 March 1913 at Penrith, New South Wales, Margaret Davis (1867-1944), daughter of Charles Fraser and widow of George Hart (d. 1895), but had no issue.
He inherited Clonelly from his uncle, Hugh Barton, in 1902. At his death it passed to his widow, who sold the estate to the Lands Commission in 1928 but retained the house until her death in 1944.
He died 27 March 1922 and was buried at Tubrid church, Kesh (Co. Fermanagh); will proved 4 April 1923 (effects £3,347). His widow died 29 November 1944 and was also buried at Tubrid; her will was proved 6 July 1945 (estate £1,696).

Barton family of The Waterfoot


Barton, Lt-Gen. Charles (1760-1819). Third son of William Barton (1723-93) and his wife Grace, eldest daughter of Very Rev. Charles Massy of Doonas (Co. Clare), Dean of Limerick, born 20 April and baptised at St Peter, Dublin, 25 April 1760. An officer in the 2nd Life Guards (Cornet, 1779; Lt., 1781; Maj. & Lt-Col., 1793; Col., 1796; Maj-Gen., 1802; Lt-Gen, 1808). He married, 26 November 1799 at Wimbledon (Surrey), Susannah (c.1775-1847), daughter of Nathaniel Weld Johnston of Bordeaux (France), wine merchant, and had issue:
(1) Lt-Col. Hugh William Barton (1800-70) (q.v.);
(2) Susannah Barton (1801-43), baptised 7 January 1802; married, 2 November 1830 at St Marylebone, Rev. John Sterling (1806-44), an unbeneficed clergyman (briefly curate of Herstmonceux in Sussex in 1834) and poet, and had issue three sons and four daughters (who after being orphaned were placed in the guardianship of their uncle, Anthony Coningham Sterling); died following childbirth, 18 April 1843;
(3) Col. Nathaniel Dunbar Barton (1803-85), born 7 June and baptised at St. Marylebone (Middx), 7 July 1803; an officer in the Bengal Cavalry (cadet, 1822; cornet, 1822; Lt. 1824; Capt. 1837; Maj. 1855; Lt-Col., 1856; on furlough from 1859 and retired as Hon. Col., 1861); married, 28 October 1831 at Karnal (India), Honoria Angeline (d. 1889), second daughter of Lt-Col. Alexander Lawrence; died in Brighton (Sussex), 23 June 1885; will proved 25 July 1885 (estate £4,077);
(4) Thomas Charles Barton (1806-56), born 1 December 1806 and baptised at St Marylebone, 13 January 1807; educated at St Paul's School, London, and Corpus Christi College, Cambridge (matriculated 1826; BA 1830; MA 1833), where he was an early member of the Apostles; he was a friend of the historian, John Mitchell Kemble, another Apostle, with whom he travelled in Germany in 1829; he later lived in Bonn (Germany) for many years, where he obviously had business interests, but what they were is unclear, unless he was an agent for his uncle's wine business; died unmarried, 16 February 1856 and was buried at Bonn (Germany); will proved in the PCC, 31 July 1856;
(5) Robert Johnstone Barton (1809-63), born 30 June and baptised at St Marylebone, 1 August 1809; said to have been in the Royal Navy but does not appear in the Navy List and so was presumably not an officer; emigrated to Australia, 1839; grazier at Boree Nyrang Station, Molong, New South Wales (Australia); JP for New South Wales, 1841; married, 30 July 1840 at St James, Sydney (Australia), Emily Maria (1817-1909), poet, eldest daughter of Maj. Edward Darvall, and had issue four sons and four or five daughters; died 4 October 1863, after which his widow sold Boree Nyrang and moved to Sydney;
(6) Anna Eleanor Stewart Barton (1810-45), born 10 December 1810 and baptised at St Marylebone, 15 January 1811; married, 7 October 1837 at Clifton, Bristol (Glos), Rev. Frederick Denison Maurice (1805-72), theologian and author, one of the founders of Christian Socialism, chaplain of Guy's Hospital, London, 1836-50, professor at Kings College, London, 1840-53 (dismissed) and Knightbridge professorship of casuistry, moral theology, and moral philosophy at Cambridge, 1866-72 (who m2, 4 July 1849, Georgina Hare-Naylor), son of Michael Maurice, a Unitarian minister; she and her husband lost a lot of money through an unwise American speculation, but had issue two sons (the elder of whom was Maj-Gen. Sir John Frederick Maurice (1841-1912), kt.); she died at Hastings (Sussex), 26 March 1845;
(7) Albert Evelyn Barton (1812-74), born 10 July and baptised at St Marylebone, 20 August 1812; educated at St. Paul's School, London; died unmarried, at Pettigo, 11 March 1874; will proved at Dublin, 3 June 1874 (effects under £1,500).
He built a new house at The Waterfoot in about 1790.
He died 11 June 1819; his will was proved in the PCC, 28 June 1819. His widow died 4 February 1847; her will was proved in the PCC, 26 March 1847.

Barton, Lt-Col. Hugh William (1800-70). Eldest son of Lt-Gen. Charles Barton (1760-1819) and his wife Susannah, daughter of Nathaniel Weld Johnston of Bordeaux (France), born and privately baptised at Fethard (Co. Tipperary), 13 December 1800. An officer in the 2nd Life Guards (Cornet, 1812; Lt., 1815; Capt., 1822; Maj. & Lt. Col., 1829; retired on half pay, 1829); returned to service with 69th Foot (Maj. & Br. Lt-Col., 1840), but evidently retired again soon afterwards. JP and DL (from 1832) for County Fermanagh; High Sheriff of Co. Fermanagh, 1837-38. He exhibited a sketching compass of his own design at the Great Exhibition of 1851. He married, 9 February 1832 at Kinlough (Co. Leitrim), Mary Caroline (1812-99), eldest daughter of Robert Johnston of Kinlough House and Mountjoy Sq., Dublin, and had issue:
(1) Charles Robert Barton (1832-1918) (q.v.);
(2) Capt. James Barton (1834-1919), born 13 August 1834; an officer in the Royal Artillery (2nd Lt., 1853; Lt., 1854; 2nd Capt., 1860; Capt., 1870; retired 1870); lived latterly at Streatham (Surrey); married, 23 August 1859, Mary Barbara (1841-1929), youngest daughter of Sir David William Barclay, 10th bt., and had issue four sons and four daughters; died 19 March 1919; will proved 6 January 1920 (estate £4,154);
(3) Florence Anna Barton (1836-1923), born September 1836; married Maj-Gen. Richard William Erskine Dawson (1832-90), son of Erskine Dawson, but had no issue; died in Chiswick (Middx), 23 December 1923; will proved 26 February 1924 (estate £262);
(4) Folliott Barton (1838-84), born 23 May 1838; educated at Rugby and then served a pupillage with William Richard Le Fanu, railway engineer; civil engineer (MICEI, 1874); worked on railway projects across Europe and later engaged in baryte mining in Co. Sligo before being bankrupted and emigrating to South Africa; a freemason from 1864; married, 19 March 1873 at Killargue (Co. Leitrim), Florence Maud, sixth daughter of Hugh Lyons-Montgomery MP of Belhavel (Co. Leitrim), and had issue one son and one daughter; died at Kentore, Transvaal (South Africa), 25 April 1884; administration of goods granted 4 August 1886 (effects £461);
(5) Hugh St. George Barton (1839-75), born 19 November 1839; educated at Royal Military College, Sandhurst;  officer in the 60th Regt. (Ensign, 1857; Lt., 1858; Capt. 1867); died unmarried, 12 June 1875; administration of his goods granted 4 March 1876 (effects under £1,000);
(6) Robert Barton (1841-69), born 3 November 1841; an officer in the Royal Navy (Lt., 1865); died unmarried, suddenly, at The Waterfoot, 3 April 1869; administration of his goods granted to his father, 13 May 1870 (effects under £1,000);
(7) Mary Everina Barton (c.1850-1925), born about 1850; 'a keen and thoughtful political controversialist' and able platform speaker, she was one of the leaders of the North Tyrone Women's Unionist Association and a member of the Ulster Unionist Council, and put her grounds at the disposal of the Ulster Volunteer Force for training purposes; she married, 29 January 1868 at Pettigo (Co. Donegal), James Montgomery Sinclair (1841-99) of Holly Hill, Strabane (Co. Tyrone) and Bonnyglen, Inver (Co. Donegal), eldest son of William Sinclair of Holly Hill, and had issue one son and two daughters (including the Arts & Crafts woodworker and teacher, Everina Sinclair (1870-1966)); died 22 April 1925; will proved 25 February 1931 (effects £25);
(8) Thomas Lloyd Barton  (1854-1936), born 2 December 1854; tea and coffee merchant; lived in Hammersmith (Middx); married, 15 April 1890 at Eltham (Kent), Fanny Roberta (1857-1931), second daughter of Lionel Isaacs of Mandeville (Jamaica) and had issue one son and two daughters; died 13 January 1936; will proved 10 February 1936 (estate £2,813);
(9) Lt-Col. Nathaniel Albert Delap Barton (1857-1938), born 29 November 1857; an officer in the Connaught Rangers (2nd Lt, 1878; Lt., 1880; Capt. 1887; Maj., 1897; Lt-Col., 1915), who served in the Boer War and First World War; awarded DSO, 1917; lived at Castletownroche (Co. Cork); married, 6 October 1888 at St James, Piccadilly, Westminster (Middx), Ellen Duffield, daughter of John M. Jordan of the USA, and had issue one son; died at Dinard (France), 26 October 1938; will proved in Dublin, 3 March 1939 (estate in Ireland, £315) and in London, 26 May 1939 (estate in England, £45).
He inherited The Waterfoot from his father in 1819.
He died 4 December 1870; his will was proved 1 March 1870 (effects under £3,000). His widow died 11 March 1899; her will was proved 18 July 1899 (estate £1,456).

Charles Robert Barton (1832-1918) 
Barton, Charles Robert (1832-1918). 
Eldest son of Lt-Col. Hugh William Barton (1800-70) and his wife Mary Caroline, eldest daughter of Robert Johnston of Kinlough House (Co. Leitrim) and Mountjoy Sq., Dublin, born 15 November 1832. An officer in the Co. Fermanagh militia (Capt.); JP (from 1863) and DL for County Fermanagh; High Sheriff of Co. Fermanagh, 1863-64. He was a Deputy Grand Master of the Grand Orange Lodge of Ireland and a founding member of the Fermanagh Protestant Defence Association, 1868. He married, 1 August 1872 at Irvinestown (Co. Fermanagh), Henrietta Martha Mervyn (1846-1915), youngest daughter of Henry Mervyn Richardson DL of Rossfad, Ballinamallard (Co. Fermanagh), and had issue:
(1) William Hugh Barton (1874-1945) (q.v.);
(2) Henry Charles Johnston Barton (1876-1964), born 12 October 1876; principal tea buyer for Lyons; lived in Barnes (Surrey); married, 30 April 1910 at St Mary Abbots, Kensington (Middx), Ethel Maude (c.1880-1961), youngest daughter of William Bancroft Espeut of Spring Gardens (Jamaica) and had issue one son and two daughters; died 26 November 1964; will proved 9 February 1965 (estate £37,339);
(3) Mary Jane Florence Barton (1878-1932), born 10 March 1878; married, 27 October 1897, Henry Burnley Rathborne (1866-1943) of Dunsinea (Co. Dublin) and Blen-na-Lung, Legys (Co. Fermanagh), son of John Garrett Rathborne of Dunsinea, and had issue two sons; died 20 February 1932; administration of goods granted to husband, 19 December 1934 (estate £50);
(4) Everina Margaret Barton (1879-1922), born 28 December 1879; married, May 1919, George Lowry of Letter (Co. Fermanagh), farmer, eldest son of John Lowry, but had no issue; died 18 November 1922; administration of goods granted 17 January 1932 (estate £810):
(5) Caroline Angel Charlotte Barton (1881-1953), born 4 April 1881; lived at Lakeside, Letter (Co. Fermanagh); died unmarried, 12 July 1953; will proved 24 March 1954 (estate £2,814);
(6) Henrietta Emily Violet Barton (1882-1968), born 21 April 1882; emigrated with her husband to Canada in 1913; married, 2 October 1902, Frederick William Lambert Sladen (1876-1921), bee breeder, fifth son of Lt-Col. Joseph Sladen of Ripple Court (Kent), and had issue two sons and one daughter; died in Vancouver (Canada), 13 September 1968 and was buried at Beechwood Cemetery, Ottawa (Canada);
(7) Rev. Charles Nathaniel Barton (1884-1949), born 5 January 1884; educated at Warwick Sch. and Trinity College, Dublin (matriculated 1905; BA 1909); ordained deacon, 1909 and priest, 1910; missionary in Sudan and northern Nigeria, 1910-23; lived in the 1930s at Whonnock, British Columbia (Canada), but later returned to England; married, 22 March 1917 at Edgware (Middx), Marion Augusta (1890-1978), only daughter of Rev. James Consterdine and had issue two sons; died at Germinstown, Transvaal, (South Africa), 6 July 1949; administration of goods granted to widow, 28 May 1951 (estate £10);
(8) Mildred Penelope Matilda (k/a Penny) Barton (1885-1971), born 25 April 1885; preacher for 'The Church with No Name', who undertook missionary work in Italian-speaking Switzerland, 1913-14; married, 27 August 1918, Simon Christopher Loane (1880-1940), farmer, eldest son of Robert Loane of Dernanesk, Kesh (Co. Fermanagh) and had issue four sons (of whom Bertram Ronald Barton Loane inherited The Waterfoot on the death of his aunt in 1970); died 6 August 1971;
(9) Susannah Cecil Grace Barton (1886-1968), born 24 December 1886; spent her life as a preacher for 'The Church with No Name' in Britain, Ireland and the United States; died unmarried in Cheadle (Staffs), 2 March 1968; will proved 30 April 1968 (estate £1,597);
(10) Bertram James Richardson Barton (1891-1960) of Eden House, Rosbeg (Co. Donegal), born 23 February 1891; educated at Warwick School; served in First World War with Royal Field Artillery (Lt.); member of the State and Executive Council of Johore (Malaya), 1934-40; served in Second World War with Home Guard (Capt.); JP (from 1944) and DL (from 1945) for Co. Fermanagh; High Sheriff of Co. Fermanagh, 1946-47; married, 14 May 1952, Anne Vaughan MSc (c.1918-2016), younger daughter of George Vaughan Hart of Waltersland, Stillorgan (Co. Dublin), and had issue one daughter; died 19 February 1960; will proved in Dublin, Belfast and London, 1961 (estate £21,500).
He inherited The Waterfoot from his father in 1870.
He died 23 November 1918; will proved in Dublin, 14 May 1919 and sealed in London, 12 July 1919 (estate in England, £1,824). His wife died 12 November 1915; administration of her goods was granted to her husband, 29 August 1916 (estate £1,696).

Barton, Lt-Col. William Hugh (1874-1945). Eldest son of Charles Robert Barton (1832-1918) and his wife Henrietta Martha Mervyn, youngest daughter of Henry Mervyn Richardson of Rossfad, Ballinamallard (Co. Fermanagh), born 30 May 1874. An officer in the Scottish Rifles, 1894-1902 and Royal Army Service Corps, 1902-18 (2nd Lt., 1894; Lt., 1896; Capt., 1900; Maj., 1913; Lt-Col., 1915), and was awarded the DSO, 1917. JP and DL (from 1922) for Co. Fermanagh; High Sheriff of Co. Fermanagh, 1924; County Councillor for Co. Fermanagh, 1924-43 (Vice-Chairman). He married, 20 February 1917 at St James, Piccadilly, Westminster (Middx), Ardyn Marion (1887-1970), second daughter of Lt-Col. Henry Tyrwhitt Staniforth Patteson of Beeston Hall, Beeston St. Andrew (Norfk), and had issue:
(1) John Charles Barton (1918-43), born 6 April 1918; educated at Rugby and Royal Military Academy, Woolwich; an officer in Royal Artillery (Capt.); awarded French Croix de Guerre twice and made a Chevalier of the Legion d'Honneur; died unmarried, of wounds received in action in North Africa, 8 April 1943; will proved 1 September 1943 (estate £65);
(2) Ruth Ardyn Barton (1921-51), born 15 February 1921; married, 24 March 1940, Lt-Col. Henry Arthur Brinsley Cavendish Butler of Silver Hill, Rostrevor (Co. Down), eldest son of Maj. Henry Halpin Cavendish Butler of Innisrath, Lisnaskea (Co. Fermanagh) and Penicuik House (Midlothian), and had issue one son; died (with her son) of injuries received in a train crash at Weedon (Northants), 21 September 1951; administration of goods granted to her husband, 1 April 1951 (estate £2,958).
He inherited The Waterfoot from his father in 1918. At his death it passed to his wife for life and then to Bertram Ronald Barton Loane, his nephew.
He died 1 February 1945; his will was proved 21 August 1945 (estate £3,583). His widow died 6 January 1970; her will was proved 16 June 1970 (estate £246,420).

Barton family of Straffan House


Hugh Barton (1766-1854) 
Barton, Hugh (Massy) (1766-1854). 
Fourth 
son of William Barton (1723-93) and his wife Grace, eldest daughter of Very Rev. Charles Massy of Doonas (Co. Clare), Dean of Limerick, born in Limerick, 8 January 1766. He joined the family wine business at Bordeaux (France) in 1786 and despite being imprisoned for a month during the Reign of Terror, 1793, and then relocating to England and Ireland, leaving the wine business in the hands of Daniel Guestier as manager until 1802, he made a large fortune from it: in the last years of his life he calculated that he was worth £1,000,000.  On his return to France in 1802 he made Guestier a partner, and the firm of Barton & Guestier was maintained by their descendants until 1986, after which it passed out of family hands. High Sheriff of Co. Kildare, 1840-41. He built the parish church at Straffan in about 1830. He married, 17 December 1791, Anne (1772-1841), daughter of Nathaniel Weld Johnston of Bordeaux, a naturalised Frenchman of Scottish origin, and had issue:
(1) Susan Barton (1793-1803), born 11 March 1793; died young, 22 December 1803;
(2) Hugh Barton (b. 1797), born 7 March 1797; died young;
(3) Anna Barton (1798-1811), born 1798; died young and was buried at St Lawrence in Thanet (Kent), 27 August 1811;
(4) Nathaniel Barton (1799-1867) (q.v.);
(5) Grace Barton (b. & d. c.1800); died in infancy;
(6) Thomas Johnston Barton (1802-64) [for whom see my account of the Bartons of Glendalough House];
(7) Isabella Barton (1804-97), born 29 June and baptised at St Marylebone (Middx), July 1804; lived in Monkstown (Co. Dublin); died unmarried aged 92 on 28 March 1897; will proved in Dublin, 27 April 1897 (estate £50,914);
(8) Capt. Daniel Barton (1806-79), born 21 February 1806; an officer in the 7th Foot (Lt., 1826; Capt., 1833; retired on half-pay, 1839); lived in Argyllshire and later in Edinburgh; married, 30 April 1846 at Hampton (Middx), Margaret (1812-82), daughter of George Bentley Sampson of Hampton, and had issue two sons; died 'of exhaustion, after a long journey from London' in Edinburgh, 5 June 1879; will confirmed, 4 July 1879 (estate £257,835);
(9) Hugh Barton (1807-60), born 21 March 1807; banker and army agent (in partnership with Charles Hopkinson and Henry Knyvett in Regent St., London) until 1843; died unmarried at Brighton (Sussex), 8 November 1860; will proved 1 December 1860 (effects under £60,000);
(10) Susan Elizabeth Barton (1810-86), born 2 May and baptised at St Marylebone, 22 June 1810; married, 9 September 1828 at Battle (Sussex), Eyre Massey (1796-1872), 3rd Baron Clarina, of Elm Place (Limerick), and had issue five sons and two daughters; died 14 November 1886; will proved 3 March 1887 (effects £10,839);
(11) Charlotte Maria Barton (b. 1812), born 8 June and baptised at St Marylebone, 7 July 1812; died in infancy.
He rented Battle Abbey (Sussex) in the early 19th century. He purchased the Straffan estate (Co. Kildare) in 1831, and also other lands in Ireland including Cootehill (Co. Roscommon). The house at Straffan was rebuilt or remodelled in 1832-33. In France he acquired the Château Langoa in 1821, and a portion of the adjacent property of Leoville (now known as Leoville-Barton) in 1826, both in the parish of St. Julien Médoc, near Bordeaux.
He died 25 May 1854 and was buried at Straffan; his will was proved 4 July 1854. His wife died at Straffan House, 3 August 1841.

Nathaniel Barton (1799-1867) 
Barton, Nathaniel (1799-1867). 
Second but eldest surviving son of Hugh Massy Barton (1766-1854) and his wife Anne, daughter of Nathaniel Weld Johnston of Bordeaux (France), born 7 September 1799. JP and DL (to 1856) for Co. Kildare; High Sheriff of Co. Kildare, 1851-52. 
Member of the Board of Management (1849-56) and Trustee (1859-66) of the London Homeopathic Hospital. He was a supporter of the Kildare Hunt and the Kildare Agricultural and Horticultural Societies, through which he encouraged agricultural improvement. He married, 12 July 1823 at the British ambassador's house in Paris, Mary Susanna (c.1804-67), daughter of Harry Harmood Scott, British consul at Bordeaux, and had issue:
(1) Hugh Lynedoch Barton (1824-99) (q.v.);
(2) Harry Fitzgerald Barton (1826-48), born 21 August 1826; died unmarried at Bordeaux, 17 May 1848; administration granted 19 December 1860 (effects under £3,000);
(3) Mary Esther Isabella Barton (1828-44), born 23 January 1828; died young at Bordeaux, 11 January 1844;
(4) Bertram Francis Barton (1830-1904) (q.v.);
(5) Anna Susan Frederica Barton (1831-1920), born November 1831; lived in London; died unmarried, 2 May 1920; will proved 9 June 1920 (estate £48,661);
(6) Charles Thomas Hugh Barton (1834-71) of Bordeaux (France), born 23 November 1834; educated at Eton; married, 21 June 1859 at Surbiton (Surrey), Clara Sophie, youngest daughter of Frank Cutler RN of Upton Lodge, Brixham (Devon), and had issue two sons; died  at Chateau Langoa, 11 September 1871; administration of goods granted 8 February 1872 (effects under £2,,000);
(7) Francis Savile Barton (1836-60), born 23 November 1836; educated at Eton; died unmarried in Rome, 3 January 1860; administration granted 19 December 1860 (effects under £3,000);
(8) Isabella Charlotte Barton (1840-1930), born 4 December 1840; lived in London and later at Torquay (Devon); died unmarried, 3 December 1930; will proved 27 February 1931 (estate £49,156);
(9) Alice Catherine Harriet Barton (1843-67), born at Bordeaux, 28 April 1843; died unmarried in Paris (France), 17 April 1867; administration granted 19 December 1860 (effects under £3,000);.
He lived chiefly in France in the 1820s and 1830s. He inherited the Straffan estate and the family vineyards in St. Julien (France) from his father in 1854.
He died 29 November 1867 and was buried at Straffan; his will was proved 21 December 1867 (effects under £140,000). His wife died at Nice (France), 18 March 1867.

Barton, Hugh Lynedoch (1824-99). Eldest son of Nathaniel Barton (1799-1867) and his wife Mary Susanna, daughter of Harry Harmood Scott, British consul at Bordeaux (France), born 30 August 1824. An officer in 1st Foot and later 6th Inniskilling Fusiliers (Ensign, 1842; Lt., 1845; retired 1852) and later in Kildare Rifles (Maj.; retired 1872). JP and DL (from 1856) for Co. Kildare; High Sheriff of Co. Kildare, 1861-62. President of the Kildare Horticultural Society. He married, 18 April 1855 at Kilkeedy (Co. Clare), his first cousin, the Hon. Anna Emily (1829-1907), elder daughter of Eyre Massey, 3rd Baron Clarina, but had no issue.
He inherited the Straffan estate and the family vineyards in St. Julien (France) from his father in 1867. His widow rented Luttrellstown (Co. Dublin) from 1899 until her death.
He died 23 February 1899; his will was prove in Dublin, 15 April 1899 (estate £84,378).  His widow died 26 October 1907; her will was proved 21 December 1907 (estate £33,360).

Barton, Bertram Francis (1830-1904). Third son of Nathaniel Barton (1799-1867) and his wife Mary Susanna, daughter of Harry Harmood Scott, British consul at Bordeaux (France), born at Bordeaux, 19 March 1830. Partner in Barton & Guestier, wine merchants of Bordeaux, based in London. An officer in the 6th Surrey Rifle Volunteers (Ensign, 1864; Lt., 1867); JP and DL (from 1899) for Co. Kildare; High Sheriff of Co. Kildare, 1903-04. He married, 27 September 1855 at the British Embassy in Paris, Fannie Annie (c.1834-1907), eldest daughter of Frank Cutler RN of Upton Lodge, Brixham (Devon), and had issue:
(1) Mary Fannie Barton (1856-1935), born 3 August, and baptised at Mortlake (Surrey), 25 September 1856; married, 25 October 1883 at Hersham (Surrey), Thomas Edward Studdy (1855-1924), surveyor and land agent, youngest son of Henry Studdy of Waddeton Court, Brixham (Devon), and had issue two sons and two daughters; died 29 July 1935; will proved 25 September 1935 (estate £2,685);
(2) Bertram Hugh Barton (1858-1927) (q.v.);
(3) Isabel Eleanor Barton (1860-1950), born 2 March and baptised at Long Ditton (Surrey), 8 July 1860; died unmarried, aged 90, on 30 May 1950; will proved 21 July 1950 (estate £18,761);
(4) Harry Scott Barton (1862-1933), of Hewshott House, Liphook (Hants) and later Jesmond Hill, Pangbourne (Berks), born 11 January and baptised at Long Ditton, 8 June 1862; married, 18 June 1893 at St Peter, Cranley Gardens, Kensington (Middx), Mary Augusta (1866-1941), daughter of Leedham White, manufacturer, but had no issue; died 26 August 1933; will proved in London, 9 January 1934 (estate £24,748) and sealed in Vancouver (Canada).
He lived at Hersham Lodge, Walton-on-Thames until he inherited the Straffan estate and the family vineyards in St. Julien (France) from his elder brother in 1899. His widow lived at Bramley (Surrey).
He died in a hotel at Cromer (Norfk), 11 September 1904; his will was proved 1 November 1904 (estate £165,193). His widow died 29 November 1907; her will was proved 20 January 1908 (estate £31,862).

Bertram Hugh Barton 
(1858-1927) 

Barton, Bertram Hugh (1858-1927). 
Elder son of Bertram Francis Barton (1830-1904) and his wife Fannie Annie, eldest daughter of Frank Cutler RN of Upton Lodge, Brixham (Devon), born 24 September and baptised at Long Ditton (Surrey), 31 October 1858. Educated at Eton and Brasenose College, Oxford (matriculated 1877; BA 1880; MA 1885). Partner in Messrs. Barton & Guestier of Bordeaux (France), based in their London office. JP and DL for Co. Kildare by 1908; High Sheriff of Co. Kildare, 1908-09. During the First World War he converted his saloon car into a field ambulance, and acted as a volunteer ambulance driver in France. He was a noted breeder of shorthorn dairy cattle. He married, 26 July 1899 at St Matthew, Bayswater, London, Lilian Edith Laura (1871-1937), only daughter of Lt-Col. Sir Frederick Waller Carden, 2nd bt., of Stargrove House, Newbury (Berks), and had issue:
(1) Frederick Bertram (k/a Derrick) Barton (1900-93) (q.v.);
(2) Hugh Ronald Barton (1902-86) of Chateau Langoa, St. Julien (France), born 29 June and baptised at St John, Paddington (Middx), 28 July 1902; educated at Eton and New College, Oxford; served in Second World War as an officer in Royal Inniskilling Fusiliers (2nd Lt., 1940; Capt., 1941; Maj.), attached to the Free French forces, and was awarded the MBE, 1942, the Croix de Guerre, 1944 and the Légion d'honneur, 1951; Chairman of Barton & Guestier, wine shippers of Bordeaux, 1927-84, and inherited Chateau Langoa and the vineyards there and at Léoville-Barton from his father in 1927; married, 29 April 1963, Phyllis Melva (1917-2003), daughter of Percival James Roadknight of Atherstone (Warks) and Deal (Kent), widow of Arthur Lushington Vipan (1914-44) and formerly wife of Thomas Dickson Cassels Cordner (1906-84), but had no issue; died 6 January 1986; will proved in Dublin, October 1986 (estate £168,917) and in London, 4 November 1986 (effects in England, £2,185);
(3) Storeen Lily Barton (1906-76), born 21 June 1906; married, Jul-Sept 1940, Wilfred Sharp (d. 1953), son of Thomas William Sharp of Blythswood South, Newcastle-on-Tyne (Northbld); died at Killiney (Co. Dublin), 8 March 1976; will proved in London, 23 May 1976 (estate £26,109) and in Dublin, 15 November 1976 (estate £49,323).
He lived in Surbiton (Surrey) until he inherited the Straffan estate and the family vineyards in St. Julien (France) from his father in 1904.
He died as the result of a hunting accident, 5 December 1927; his will was proved in Dublin, 22 May 1928 (estate in Ireland, £40, 354) and in London, 19 June 1928 (estate in England, £24,016).  His widow died 19 October 1937; her will was proved in London, 2 February 1938 (effects £3,717).

Frederick Bertram (Derrick) 
Barton (1900-93)
 
Barton, Frederick Bertram (k/a Derrick) (1900-93). 
Elder son of Bertram Hugh Barton (1858-1927) and his wife Lilian Edith Laura, only daughter of Lt-Col. Sir Frederick Waller Carden, 2nd bt., born 19 June 1900. Educated at Eton and Royal Military College, Sandhurst. An officer in the 17th/21st Lancers (2nd Lt., 1920; Lt., 1922; retired 1928) and served in Second World War (2nd Lt., 1942, retiring as Hon. Capt). A partner in the firm of Barton & Guestier of Bordeaux. After leaving the army he was involved in party politics for some years as a member of the Farmers & Ratepayers Party (for which he stood unsuccessfully for the Dáil in Co. Kildare) and later for Fine Gael (for which he was a County Councillor for Naas), but he retired from politics altogether in 1934. He was a member of the General Synod of the Church of Ireland and later President of Royal Dublin Society, 1966-68. As a young man he could run very fast and h
e represented Great Britain in the Modern Pentathlon at the 1924 Olympics in Paris; he was also a passionate point-to-pointer and for many years was Chairman of the Kildare Hunt Club. He married, 16 February 1927 at Aghade (Co. Carlow), Joan Aileen (1902-90), second daughter of Maj-Gen. Robert St. Clair Lecky CMG DSO of Ballykealey, Tullow (Co. Carlow), and had issue:
(1) Christopher Bertram Ronald Barton (1927-2013), born 21 November 1927; educated at St. Columba's College and Jesus College, Cambridge (BA), where he rowed in the victorious 1948 Cambridge team in the Boat Race, and also for the UK in the 1948 Olympic Games (silver medal); married 1st, 8 February 1956 (div. 1964), Dorothy Margot, second daughter of Walter Jack Bushell of Fullerton Station, Laggan, New South Wales (Australia) and had issue one daughter; married 2nd, Jul-Sept 1966 in London, Rosemary H. King, and had further issue one daughter; died in Christchurch (New Zealand), 18 August 2013;
(2) Anthony Frederick Barton (b. 1930) (q.v.).
He inherited the Straffan estate of some 1200 acres, half of his father's share in the wine business, and a share in the Chateau Langoa and Léoville estates from his father in 1927, but finding the Straffan estate was haemorrhaging money he sold off some land in 1933, reduced the size of the house in 1937-39 and eventually sold the remainder of the property in 1949. His French interests were divided between his sons at his death.
He died 20 November 1993; his will was proved in November 1994 (estate £289,322). His wife died 19 October 1990; her will was proved in London, 20 March 1991 (estate £22,086).

Antony Barton (b. 1930) 
Barton, Anthony Frederick (b. 1930). Younger son of Frederick Bertram (k/a Derrick) Barton (1900-93) and his wife Joan Aileen, second daughter of Maj-Gen. Robert St. Clair Lecky CMG DSO of Ballykealey, Tullow (Co. Carlow), born 6 July 1930. Educated at Stowe and Jesus College, Cambridge. He moved to France in 1951 to work for Barton & Guestier and in 1967 set up his own company (Vins Fins Anthony Barton). He succeeded his uncle Ronald as owner of the family vineyards of Langoa-Barton and Léoville-Barton at St Julien, 1983 and in recognition of his work in improving standards on his estates and as an ambassador for Bordeaux wines around the world, he was Decanter Magazine's Man of the Year, 2007. He married, 14 January 1955, Eva, daughter of Paul Frederik Sarauw of Copenhagen (Denmark), author and translator, and had issue:
(1) Lilian Anna Barton (b. 1956), born 13 February 1956; joined her father in managing Vins Fins Anthony Barton and the vineyards at Langoa and Léoville, 1978, and succeeded him as owner in 2010; married, 1985, Michel Sartorius and had issue one son and one daughter, both now also working in the wine business;
(2) Thomas Barton (1958-90), born in Copenhagen, 5 January 1958; died unmarried in a motor accident in France, 1990.
He inherited Chateau Langoa and the vineyards there and at Léoville-Barton from his uncle in 1984 and restored the house. In 2011 his daughter and grandson also bought Château Mauvesin in Moulis (Médoc).
Now living.

Barton family of Rochestown House


Barton, Dunbar (1769-1848). Sixth son of William Barton (1723-93) and his wife Grace, eldest daughter of Very Rev. Charles Massy of Doonas (Co. Clare), Dean of Limerick, born 7 November 1769. An officer in the army (Cornet, 1789; Lt. 1793; Capt. 1796; retired 1798). High Sheriff of Co. Tipperary, 1810-11. He married, 1798, Elizabeth (1778-1853), daughter of the Rev. Samuel Riall, rector of Killenaule (Co. Tipperary) and his wife Elizabeth, daughter of Col. Lawford Miles of Rochestown House (Co. Tipperary), and had issue:
(1) Samuel William Barton (1803-55) (q.v.);
(2) Dunbar Thomas Barton (1806-29), born 1806; educated at Trinity College, Dublin (matriculated 1822); an officer in the army (Ensign, 1825; Lt., 1826); died in Dublin, 20 January 1829;
(3) Augustine Hugh Barton (1815-74) of Fitzwilliam Square, Dublin, born 3 August 1815; educated at Trinity College, Dublin (admitted 1830), Kings Inns, Dublin (admitted 1835; called 1845) and Grays Inn (admitted 1842); barrister-at-law; married, 12 October 1853 at St Peter, Dublin, Emily Anne (1827-1907), second daughter of James Martin of Ross (Co. Galway) and widow of James McCalmont of Abbeylands and Breen (Co. Antrim), and had issue two daughters (one of whom was the artist, Rose Barton (1856-1929)); died 23 October 1874; administration of his goods (with will annexed) granted to his widow, 29 January 1875 (effects under £800);
(4) Thomas Henry Barton (1816-78) (q.v.).
He inherited Rochestown House in right of his wife, whose maternal family estate it had been.
He died 19 May 1848. His widow died 16 October 1853.

Barton, Samuel William (1803-55). Eldest son of Dunbar Barton (1769-1848) and his wife Elizabeth, daughter of the Rev. Samuel Riall, rector of Killenaule (Co. Tipperary), born 10 April 1803. Educated at Eton, Trinity College, Dublin (admitted 1820; BA 1825; MA 1831) and Grays Inn (admitted 1825; called 1828). Barrister-at-law. JP (by 1827) and DL (from 1835) for Co. Tipperary. He was a Conservative in politics, and stood unsuccessfully for Parliament in the Tipperary constituency in 1838. He was a Guardian of the Poor for Clogheen Union in the 1840s and 1850s, and Vice-President of the Ardfinnan & Newcastle Agricultural Society. He married, 13 July 1831, Emma Maria (1810-89), daughter of the Hon. Christopher Hely-Hutchinson MP of Knocklofty (Co. Tipperary), and had issue:
(1) Elizabeth Mary Barton (1832-96), born April 1832; married, 11 July 1872 at Tunbridge Wells (Kent), Antoni Marcelli Szymanski (1813-94), a Polish army officer and author living in exile in Paris; died in London, 4 January 1896; will proved 31 January 1896 (estate £7,174);
(2) Anna Grace Barton (1833-90), born early in 1833; died unmarried at Pau (France), 10 September 1890;
(3) Lt-Col. Christopher Barton (1834-1913) (q.v.);
(4) Mary Barton (c.1837-65), born about 1837; married, 27 August 1864 at Clogheen (Co. Tipperary), Theodore Cooke, son of John Cooke, but had no issue; died of cholera at Kirkee, Bombay (India), 21 June 1865 and was buried there the following day; administration of goods granted 24 December 1865 (estate under £1,000);
(5) Evelyn Isabella Barton (1839-65), born 30 October 1839; died unmarried of tuberculosis in Paris while travelling to Mentone with her mother, 3 December 1865; will proved 31 January 1866 (effects under £1,500);
(6) Dunbar Henry Barton (1841-87), born 16 October and baptised at Ardfinnan (Co. Tipperary), 19 November 1841; emigrated to Queensland (Australia), where he was proprietor of the St. Lawrence Hotel but was judged to be insolvent, 1879; married, 22 October 1867, Anne Macmillan, and had issue at least two sons (one born before the marriage); died intestate, 6 March 1887 and was buried in Alpha Cemetery, Barcaldine, Queensland (Australia);
(7) Lt-Col. Crosbie Barton (1845-1902), born in Dublin, 29 June 1845; an officer in the army (Ensign, 1863; Lt., 1868; Capt., 1878; Maj. 1881; retired as Lt-Col., 1886, but returned to active service with Imperial Yeomanry in Boer War, 1898-1900); lived in retirement at Dunnington (Warks) and later at Frampton Lodge, Frampton-on-Severn (Glos); married, 12 December 1878 at British Embassy in Paris, Catherine Janette (1849-1929), eldest daughter of Richard Warburton of Garryhinch (Co. Offaly) and widow of Charles Lockhart Hamilton (d. 1874), and had issue three daughters; died 25 August 1902; administration of his goods (with will annexed) granted to his widow, 2 October 1902 (effects £114);
(8) William Archer Barton (b. 1849), born in Dublin, 15 May 1849*; probably died in infancy.
He inherited Rochestown House from his father in 1848. His widow lived after his death at Tunbridge Wells (Kent) and later at Surbiton (Surrey).
He died of heart disease in Dublin, 19 November 1855; his will was proved in 1855. His widow died in Surbiton, 7 March 1889.
* Some sources give the date as 29 May 1847.

Barton, Lt-Col. Christopher (1834-1913). Eldest son of Samuel William Barton (1803-55) and his wife Emma Maria, daughter of the Hon. Christopher Hely-Hutchinson, MP for Cork, born 22 February 1834. An officer in the Tipperary Light Infantry (Capt. by 1855), and later in the 7th Dragoons Guards and 18th Hussars (Cornet, 1856; Lt., 1857; Capt., 1860; Maj. 1867; Lt-Col., 1876; retired 1877). JP for Co. Tipperary. He was a Conservative in politics, and stood unsuccessfully for Parliament in the Tipperary South constituency in 1885. He was unmarried and without issue.
He inherited Rochestown House from his father in 1855, but sold it in about 1866. He lived latterly at the Army & Navy Club in London.
He died in London, 21 July 1913. His will was proved 6 November 1913 (estate £40).

Barton, Thomas Henry (1816-78). Fourth and youngest son of Dunbar Barton (1769-1848) and his wife Elizabeth, daughter of the Rev. Samuel Riall, rector of Killenaule (Co. Tipperary), born 29 March 1816. Educated at Trinity College, Dublin (admitted 1830; BA 1838; MA 1847; LLD 1867), King's Inns, Dublin (admitted, 1840; called 1844) and Middle Temple (admitted 1842). Barrister-at-law; Law Lecturer at King's Inns, 1864-67; Dublin Metropolitan Police Magistrate, 1867-78. He was a Conservative in politics and stood unsuccessfully for Parliament in the Clonmel constituency in 1853. He married, 6 January 1853 at 30 Upper Fitzwilliam St., Dublin, the Hon. Charlotte (c.1832-1918), third daughter of John Span Plunket QC, 3rd Baron Plunket, and had issue:
(1) Rt. Hon. Sir Dunbar Plunket Barton (1853-1937), 1st bt. (q.v.);
(2) Augustine Frederick Palliser Barton (1854-1919), born 29 December 1854 and baptised at Kinrossanty (Co. Waterford), 18 March 1855; educated at Trinity College, Dublin (BA 1876) and Middle Temple (called 1901); barrister-at-law; clerk with Civil Service Commission, 1876-91; private secretary to Paymaster General, 1880; Local Government Board auditor for Oxfordshire, 1891-1919; a freemason from 1892; died unmarried, 1 April 1919; will proved 16 June 1919 (estate £3,286);
(3) Sylvia Charlotte Elizabeth Barton (1857-1916), born 1 October 1857; married, 22 September 1881 at Navan (Co. Meath), Arthur George Kennedy Woodgate (1845-1929), civil servant and later HM Inspector of Factories, only son of Arthur Woodgate of Halifax, Nova Scotia (Canada), and had issue two sons and three daughters; buried at Putney Vale Cemetery, London, 19 February 1916;
(4) Eleanor Constance Barton (1859-1939), born 5 November 1859; nurse; matron of the Chelsea Infirmary; president of the Poor Law Infirmary Matrons' Association; member of the British Nursing Council; author of Hints to VAD Nurses in Hospitals (1915); awarded Royal Red Cross (First Class), 1916; lived in Danvers St., Chelsea (Middx); died unmarried, 19 February 1939; will proved 16 March 1939 (estate £1,979);
(5) Aubrey David Plunket Barton (1864-1912), born 11 May 1864; educated at Charterhouse; emigrated to America before 1894, where he worked at different times as a ranch manager in Colorado; a manufacturer of regalia in West Virginia, and as manager of the 'news department and museum' at Albuquerque, New Mexico, before settling in Los Angeles; married, 12 November 1901 in Los Angeles, California (USA), Kathryn Virginia Floding (1882-1960) (who m2, 31 December 1913 at Riverside, California, Wallace Ward Barclay (1892-1941)), and had issue one daughter; died in Los Angeles, 9 December 1912; 
(6) Violet Grace Louisa Barton (1866-1939), born 7 February 1866; lived with her mother and later at Wimbledon (Surrey); died unmarried, 24 December 1939; will proved 27 January 1940 (estate £1,497);
(7) Ion Plunket Barton (1872-99), born 1 June 1872; an officer in the Royal Navy (Midshipman, 1886; Sub-Lt., 1892; Lt., 1894); died at Hankou (China), now part of Wuhan City, 2 October 1899.
He died at his home in Monkstown (Co. Dublin), 19 April 1878; administration of his goods was granted to his widow, 28 May 1878 (effects under £12,000). His widow died 30 May 1918; her will was proved in Dublin and sealed in England, 13 August 1918 (effects in England, £770).

Sir Dunbar Plunket Barton, 1st bt. 
Barton, Rt. Hon. Sir (Dunbar) Plunket (1853-1937), 1st bt. 
Eldest son of Thomas Henry Barton (1816-78) and his wife, the Hon. Charlotte, third daughter of John Span Plunket QC, 3rd Baron Plunket, born 29 October 1853. Educated at Harrow (where he was 'the most brilliant pupil of the year' in 1872), Corpus Christi College, Oxford (matriculated 1873; President of the Oxford Union), the Inner Temple (admitted 1875; called 1893; bencher) and King's Inns, Dublin (called 1880; bencher). Barrister at law (QC 1889); Private Secretary to Duke of Marlborough as Lord Lieutenant of Ireland, 1880; Private Secretary to Lord Ashbourne as Lord Chancellor of Ireland, 1885; Professor and Lecturer at King's Inns, Dublin, 1885-91; Conservative MP for Mid Armagh, 1891-1900; Solicitor-General for Ireland, 1898-1900; Judge of High Court in Ireland, 1900-18; 
Chairman of the Industrial Court, 1920He was created a baronet, 28 January 1918 and sworn of the Privy Council of Ireland, 1919. Senator of National University of Ireland, 1909-23; Chairman of National Committee for Irish War Memorial, 1919; Trustee of National Library of Ireland, 1920; President of the Royal Victoria Eye and Ear Hospital of Ireland; a Governor of the Royal City of Dublin Hospital; a member of the Royal Irish Academy; a Fellow of the Royal Historical Society, the Irish College of St Columba, and the Irish Society of Antiquaries. A keen golfer, he was President of the Golfing Union of Ireland and of several clubs. He was the author of Treatise on the Irish Land Act (1896); Bernadotte, the First Phase (1914); Links between Ireland and Shakespeare (1919); Bernadotte and Napoleon (1920); Bernadotte, Prince and King, 1810–1844 (1925); The Story of our Inns of Courts (1924); Links between Shakespeare and the Law (1929); The Amazing Career of Bernadotte, 1763–1844 (1929) and Timothy Healy (1933). He married, 5 October 1900 at Christ Church Cathedral, Dublin, Mary Tottenham (c.1865-1928), daughter of Joseph Manly of Dublin, and had issue:
(1) Dunbar Patrick Barton (1901-29), born 18 August 1901; died unmarried in the lifetime of his father, 14 September 1929; administration of his goods granted to his father, 8 October 1929 (estate £2,911).
He lived at 2 Grays Inn Square, London.
He died 11 September 1937, when his baronetcy became extinct; his will was proved 29 November 1937 (estate £3,285). His wife died 12 October 1928; administration of her goods was granted to her husband, 16 March 1929 (estate £332).


Principal sources

Burke's Irish Family Records, 1976, pp. 77-82; A. Rowan, The buildings of Ireland: North-West Ulster, 1979, p. 453; M. Bence-Jones, A guide to Irish country houses, 2nd edn., 1990, pp. 146-47, 266, 282, 302-03; J.B. Cunningham, 'The Investigation into the Attempted Assassination of Folliot Warren Barton near Pettigo, on 31 October 1845', Clogher Record, 1990, pp. 125-45; E.M. Johnston-Liik, History of the Irish Parliament, 2002, iii, pp. 144-45; T. Blake, Abandoned mansions of Ireland, 2016, p. 298; J.A.K. Dean, The gate lodges of Leinster: a gazetteer, 2016, p. 203; J.A.K. Dean, The gate lodges of Munster: a gazetteer, 2018, pp. 200-01, 215; A. Tierney, The buildings of Ireland: Central Leinster, 2019, pp. 603-05;

Location of archives

Barton family of Clonelly: deeds, legal and estate papers, 1835-1935 [Public Record Office of Northern Ireland, D1028]
Barton family of Grove: deeds and papers, 1667-19th cent. [National Library of Ireland, Barton papers]
No significant archives are known to survive for other branches of the family in Ireland. Barton & Guestier are believed to retain a significant archive of material relating to the firm's activities.

Coat of arms

Argent, a rose gules seeded or and barbed vert, between three boars' heads erased proper.

Can you help?

  • I should be most grateful if anyone can provide photographs or portraits of people whose names appear in bold above, and who are not already illustrated.
  • Any additions or corrections to the account given above will be gratefully received and incorporated. I am always particularly pleased to hear from members of the family who can supply recent personal information for inclusion.

Revision and acknowledgements

This post was first published 16 July 2020. I am grateful to Aidan O'Boyle for the suggestion that Sir Richard Morrison may have designed the remodelling of Grove; to Patricia Barton for information and images, and to Mrs Rosemary Ponsonby of Grove and Harriet Landseer for their suggestions and information.