Tuesday, 15 October 2019

(394) Barnard of Kempston Hoo, Cople House and Furzebrook House

Joseph Barnard (1745-1825), with whom the genealogy below begins, was the son of a Hertfordshire yeoman. He was apprenticed to a London clothworker, and became a freeman of the city of London in 1768, but soon afterwards he seems to have made a complete change of career, and set himself up as a coal merchant in Cambridge. In 1776 he moved his business to Bedford, where he also dealt in building supplies and was in partnership with John Mott until the end of 1785. His firm proving profitable, he turned to banking in the 1790s as a way of employing his surplus capital. The date when he took up banking is given variously between 1793 and 1801, but the earliest certain reference to the Bedford Bank seems to be in 1803, when he was in partnership with John Wing and John Perkins. His elder son, Joseph Talbot Barnard (1775-1834), who became a cornfactor, was declared bankrupt in 1803, and the provisions of Joseph's will suggest that he was never trusted financially thereafter. Joseph's younger son, Thomas Barnard (1784-1853), became a partner in the Bank in 1810, and Francis Green was also a partner by 1812. By then the firm had successfully weathered two emergencies: a run on the bank in 1809-10 and the theft of over £15,000 of the firm's investment capital by a Bank of England cashier. The firm traded as Barnard & Green until 1826, after which it operated under Thomas Barnard's name only (later Thomas Barnard & Co.) until 1857. By then Thomas had died and his two sons, Talbot Barnard (1827-67) and Thomas Barnard (1830-1909) were running the business. They brought in Thomas Twining Wing as a partner from 1857-73 and after Talbot Barnard's death, Thomas was joined by his brother-in-law, Frederick Stanley Carpenter (1817-90). Thomas Barnard retired in 1908 and his son, Thomas Henry Barnard (1866-1916) took over as managing partner until in 1915 the firm was sold to Parr's Bank. According to T.H. Barnard's younger son, Sir Geoffrey Barnard, his father was so successful at encouraging the young men he employed in the bank to join up for service in the First World War that he was left with insufficient staff to cope with the workload, and that this led both to the sale of the business and his father's sudden death at the breakfast table the following year.

After the vicissitudes of its early years, the Bedford Bank made successive generations of the family prosperous. Thomas Barnard (1784-1853) continued to live in the town of Bedford, but his two sons, Talbot Barnard (1827-67) and Thomas Barnard (1830-1909) both acquired properties outside the town. Talbot Barnard bought Kempston Hoo around the time of his marriage in 1849. The house had been built a few years earlier for Thomas John Green, who seems to have been a nephew of the Francis Green who was a partner in the Bedford Bank in the 1820s. Talbot Barnard apparently extended the house, and this may have been done as soon as he bought it, for he lived in Torquay for most of 1850 and his eldest son, Talbot Barnard (1850-88) was born there. Talbot Green senior died in his fortieth year and within a few years his widow had moved to Ealing (Middx). Talbot Green junior took over Kempston Hoo, but seems not to have worked in the family bank. In 1884 he sold the house and moved abroad, possibly on health grounds, for he died in Monte Carlo in 1888. His widow had returned to England by 1893, when she was bankrupted - apparently partly as a result of gambling debts incurred at Monte - but after that she disappears and her death has not been traced. Her eldest son became an engineer in the oil industry, and was murdered in Azerbaijan in 1911; her younger son emigrated to Canada; and her daughter and her husband emigrated to America. 

Thomas Barnard (1830-1909) rented Cople House (Beds) from the Duke of Bedford from 1855, and later purchased the freehold. He enlarged the house in about 1875, and it continued to be occupied by his widow (who died aged 96 in 1929) and their daughter until it was requisitioned in the Second World War for use as a hostel by the Women's Land Army. It continued to be used as a hostel until 1950, but by then the family had sold it; the house burned down in 1971 and was subsequently demolished.

Thomas Barnard's only son, Thomas Henry Barnard (1866-1916), the last of the family to run the Bedford Bank, bought Kempston Hoo when it came on the market in 1898, and lived there until his death in 1916. His widow and young family remained in occupation for a few years afterwards, but the house was sold again in about 1920, and demolished in the 1930s to make way for housing development. T.H. Barnard's eldest son, Thomas Theodore Barnard (1898-1983), undertook postgraduate research at Cambridge after returning from the First World War, and became an academic. From 1924-34 he held a teaching post in South Africa, where his three children were all born, and when he came back to England he looked for a house near the sea. His choice settled on Furzebrook House near Wareham (Dorset), where an added attraction was a flooded claypit on the estate which had gained a reputation with artists as a beauty spot, and which he developed as a tourist attraction known as The Blue Pool. It was closed in the Second World War, but reopened in 1946 under the management of his teenage daughter, Jennifer Barnard (b. 1929), who still owns and operates it today, in a remarkable example of business continuity.


Kempston Hoo, Bedfordshire


Kempston Hoo: the house in 1920.
A neo-Jacobean house of stone, built, apparently as a speculation rather than for his own occupation, in the early 1840s by Thomas John Green (1806-68), a leading Bedford citizen who served as County Treasurer and was Mayor of Bedford, 1843-45. The house has similarities of style to the former Pavenham Bury, remodelled in 1842 for Green's cousin and partner, Thomas Abbot Green, and it seems very likely the two men employed the same architect, who may have been J.T. Wing, probably then the leading architect in Bedford, although most of Wing's known was in a classical style. Wing is known to have restored Pavenham church for T.A. Green in the 1840s, and like the Greens and Talbot Barnard - who bought Kempston Hoo in 1849 - he was a member of the oligarchy that controlled Bedford at this time; his father had also been a partner in the Bedford Bank. The house is said to have been considerably enlarged by Talbot Barnard and this was perhaps done in 1849-51, when Barnard was living in rented accommodation in Torquay (Devon).


Kempston Hoo: the house in 1931, on the eve of demolition.

The house stood in extensive grounds south-west of the village of Kempston, and in 1884 was advertised as containing an entrance hall with the staircase leading out of it; a drawing room, dining room, morning room and library; and ten bedrooms and two dressing rooms, apart from the service accommodation. After the house was sold to Thomas Henry Barnard in 1898 it seems to have been modernised, with some of the bedrooms being sacrificed to make bathrooms, and the installation of electric light. Downstairs, a billiard room and conservatory seem to have been added, although when the house was valued under the 1925 Rating & Valuation Act, the assessor noted that the former was actually 'used for Badminton'.
Kempston Hoo: the house in its setting in 1882, from the 1st edn 6" OS map.
Image: National Library of Scotland.
Overall, he considered it a 'Very Good House', 
but ominously, another hand has commented 'Rather on the large side', and when the property was sold in 1931 the 'very good grounds' became a suburban housing estate and the house itself was demolished.

Descent: built for Thomas John Green (1806-68), who sold or let to Robert Hobson; sold 1849 to Talbot Barnard (1827-67); to son, Talbot Barnard (1850-88), who sold 1884 to Robert Orr Campbell (d. 1892); sold to Hugh d'Oyly Tweedy (d. 1898); sold to Thomas Henry Barnard (1866-1916); sold to Lt-Col. Oscar L. Eugster (d. 1930); sold 1931 for redevelopment and demolished.


Cople House, Bedfordshire


A three-storey early 19th century house that was probably originally L-shaped, built for the Duke of Bedford, whose family had owned the Cople and Willington estates since 1774. The house replaced an earlier building, and a bell which survived from the predecessor house was dated 1678, perhaps giving an indication of its date. 
Cople House: the garden front [Image: Bedfordshire Archives BD1391/5]

The new house was built by Nixon of Woburn, and was apparently constructed in about 1822, when the Cople estate was let to George James Ludlow (1758-1842), 3rd Earl Ludlow. Thomas Barnard took on the tenancy in 1855, but seems to have bought the freehold between 1861 and 1875, when the house was considerably enlarged by the addition of a west wing. With this addition, the house was a little larger than Kempston Hoo, with four reception rooms in addition to the entrance hall and fifteen principal bedrooms.

The house was requisitioned for use as a Women's Land Army hostel in the Second World War, and continued to be used for that purpose until 1950. It was presumably then returned to private occupation, but the house was destroyed by fire in 1971 and demolished. The stable block survived the fire but was derelict by 1978, when it was divided into three dwellings. The site of the house is now occupied by a housing estate.

Descent: Duke of Marlborough sold 1774 to executors of John Russell (1710-71), 4th Duke of Bedford, whose son, Francis Russell (1765-1802), 5th Duke of Bedford came of age in 1786; to brother, John Russell (1766-1839), 6th Duke of Bedford; to son, Francis Russell (1788-1861), 7th Duke of Bedford; to son, William Russell (1809-72), 8th Duke of Bedford, who probably sold it to Thomas Barnard (1830-1909); to widow, Isabella Barnard (1832-1929); to daughter, Beatrice Catherine Isabella Barnard (1861-1947); requisitioned for use by Women's Land Army, 1943-50; sold 1947...burnt 1971 and demolished. Successive Dukes of Bedford let the house in 1800-02 to George Ferdinand Fitzroy (1761-1810), 2nd Baron Southampton; in 1803-42 to George James Ludlow (1758-1842), 3rd Earl Ludlow; in 1842-53 to George Stevens Byng (1806-86), Viscount Enfield (later 7th Earl of Strafford); in 1853-55 to T.W. and Richard C. Wing of Bedford; and from 1855 to Thomas Barnard (1830-1909).


Furzebrook House, Church Knowle, Dorset


The house is perhaps rather small to be regarded as a true country house, but it is undeniably a gentleman's residence. There seems to have been a house on the site by 1862, when it was tenanted, but in 1865 this was still described as a cottage.  The property formed part of the Furzebrook estate of the Pike family, who operated a series of claypits in the vicinity producing high quality clay for use in the Staffordshire pottery industry, and in the 1880s Lawrence Warburton Pike (d. 1900) took up residence here with his wife. He may have enlarged or rebuilt the existing cottage, but the simple gabled elevation and minimal neo-Jacobean detail of the house could have been built at any time in the mid to late 19th century. 


Furzebrook House: the property when it was advertised for sale in 1933.

By the early 20th century, one of the flooded abandoned clay workings near the house was attracting artists and other visitors because of the striking blue colour of the water there. After the house was sold to the Barnard family in 1935, about 25 acres of the grounds around 'the Blue Pool' were fenced off and landscaped as a visitor attraction, and a tea house was built to sell refreshments to the visitors. Although closed for the duration of the Second World War, the family revived this facility after they regained possession of the estate in 1946, and it remains open today.

Descent: perhaps built for Lawrence Warburton Pike (d. 1900); to widow, Eleanor (d. 1934); sold 1935 to Thomas Theodore Barnard (1898-1983); to son, Thomas Peregrine Barnard (b. 1930).


Barnard family of Kempston Hoo and Furzebrook House


Barnard, Joseph (1745-1825). Younger son of John Barnard (1713-87) of Parsonage Farm, Sawbridgeworth (Herts) and his wife Mary Cramphorne (1716-83), baptised at Sawbridgeworth, 9 August 1745. He was apprenticed to Francis Hutchins, a London clothworker, and was admitted a freeman of the City of London in 1768. It seems probable that shortly after this he began business as a coal merchant. He apparently lived at Cambridge for some time, but by 1773 he was living at Earith (Hunts.). In 1776 he leased premises in Bedford St Mary comprising the former 'Chapel of Herne' (the building in which John Bunyan had been tried in 1661, but then a warehouse) and a coal yard. He was admitted a freeman of the Borough in 1781 and was invited to serve as Mayor in 1806, but declined the honour. In the 1790s he moving into banking and founded Barnard's Bank (also known as Bedford Bank) in 1799. In 1809-10 there was a run on the bank and in 1811 a cashier at the Bank of England embezzled over £15,600 of the firm’s investment funds, almost causing the bank to fail, but the firm survived thanks to the loyalty of Joseph's friends, Samuel Whitbread and the Duke of Bedford. He married, 23 February 1773 at Linton (Cambs), Mary (1741-1824), daughter of Thomas Talbot of Linton, attorney, and had issue:
(1) Joseph Talbot Barnard (1775-1834), baptised at Bluntisham-cum-Earith (Hunts), 18 May 1775; corn factor in Bedford (bankrupt 1803); he was left only an annual allowance in his father's will; died unmarried, 1 September and was buried at Bawburgh (Norfk), 5 September 1834;
(2) Mary Barnard (b. 1777), baptised at Bedford, 3 October 1777; probably died young;
(3) John Barnard (b. 1779), baptised at Bedford, 18 June 1779; probably died young;
(4) Martha Barnard (1780-1804), born 18 December 1780; married, 28 April 1803 at St Paul, Bedford, Digby Thomas Carpenter (1780-1853), and had issue one son, who died young; said to have died at Gibraltar following the birth of her son, 1804;
(5) Thomas Barnard (1784-1853) (q.v.).
He lived in Bedford.
He was buried at St Paul, Bedford, 6 September 1825; his will was proved in the PCC, 22 September 1825. His wife died about 4 March and was buried at St Paul, Bedford, 10 March 1824.

Barnard, Thomas (1784-1853). Youngest son of Joseph Barnard (1745-1825), and his wife Mary, daughter of Thomas Talbot of Linton (Cambs), attorney, born 18 March and baptised at Bedford, 31 July 1784. Coal merchant (until 1827) and banker at Bedford; Treasurer of Bedford General Infirmary; Director of the Bedford Charities. He married, 9 May 1820, Anne (1792-1864), third daughter of Thomas Fisher of Cambridge, banker, and had issue:
(1) Mary Barnard (1821-1904), born 6 May and baptised at St Paul, Bedford, 13 May 1821; married, 28 December 1841 at St Paul, Bedford, Rev. Alexander Grant (1818-80), rector of Manningford Bruce (Wilts), son of Edward Grant, judge in India, and had issue one son; died in Rome, 26 November 1904; will proved 14 February 1905 (estate £1,447);
(2) Joseph Barnard (1822-42), baptised at St Paul, Bedford, 7 July 1822; died unmarried, 2 March, and was buried at St. Paul, Bedford, 10 March 1842;
(3) Emma Barnard (1825-1922), born 3 August and baptised at St Mary, Bedford, 5 August 1825; married, 2 April 1850, Frederick Stanley Carpenter JP (1817-90) of Bromham (Beds) and had issue five sons and two daughters; died aged 96 on 13 January 1922; will proved 15 May 1922 (estate £2,309);
(4) Talbot Barnard (1827-67) (q.v.);
(5) Gertrude Barnard (1828-46), born 1828 and baptised at St Paul, Bedford, 11 January 1829; died unmarried, 21 July and was buried at St Paul, Bedford, 28 July 1846;
(6) Thomas Barnard (1830-1909) (q.v.);
(7) Octavius Bernard (b. & d. 1831), baptised at St Paul, Bedford, 31 August 1831; died in infancy, 9 September 1831.
He lived in Bedford.
He died 3 June 1853 and was buried at St Paul, Bedford, 10 June 1853; his will was proved in the PCC, 29 June 1853. His widow died at Cople House, 14 January 1864; her will was proved 2 February 1864 (effects under £1000).

Barnard, Talbot (1827-67). Elder son of Thomas Barnard (1784-1853) and his wife Anne, daughter of Thomas Fisher of Cambridge, banker, baptised at St Paul, Bedford, 19 September 1827. Educated at Bedford School and Emmanuel College, Cambridge. Banker in Bedford in partnership with his father and younger brother, Thomas Barnard. He had antiquarian interests and was a leading figure in the Bedfordshire Architectural and Archaeological Society (Vice-President). JP for Bedfordshire; High Sheriff of Bedfordshire, 1856-57. He was particularly noted for his contribution to public improvements and charitable causes, and for the improvements he made to the cottages on his estate. He married, 25 September 1849 at St Paul, Bedford, Mary (1829-1909), daughter of Nicholas Fitzpatrick MD of Bedford and had issue:
(1) Talbot Barnard (1850-88) (q.v.);
(2) Gertrude Marye [sic] Barnard (1851-1942), born 4 December and baptised at Kempston, 28 December 1851; died unmarried 28 April 1942; will proved 9 June 1942 (estate £13,410);
(3) Mary Blanche Barnard (1854-1923), born 22 June and baptised at Kempston, 6 September 1854; died unmarried, 11 December 1923; will proved 22 February 1924 (estate £12,755);
(4) Arthur Fitzpatrick Barnard (1856-1942), born 26 December 1856 and baptised at Kempston, 25 January 1857; emigrated to Springfield, Manitoba (Canada) but later returned to England and worked as a market gardener in Ealing; married, 1880 (div. c.1892) at Lisgar, Manitoba, Lucy (1861-1918), daughter of Samuel Arkell of Lisgar, farmer, and had issue one son; died 31 January 1942; will proved 26 October 1942 (estate £317);
(5) Amy Caroline Barnard (1859-1940), born 14 July and baptised at Kempston, 14 August 1859; died unmarried 13 June 1940; will proved 2 September 1940 (estate £10,338).
He purchased Kempston Hoo in about 1849. After his death his widow moved to Ealing (Middx).
He died after a long illness on 15 December and was buried at Kempston, 21 December 1867. His widow died in Ealing (Middx), 15 January 1909; her will was proved 20 February 1909 (estate £2,886).

Barnard, Talbot (1850-88). Elder son of Talbot Barnard (1827-67) and his wife Mary, daughter of Nicholas Fitzpatrick MD of Bedford, born at Torquay (Devon), 10 July 1850. He married, 26 October 1875 at Christ Church, Ealing (Middx), Lilian (b. 1855), daughter of Col. William Augustin John Mayhew, Adjutant-General of the Bengal Army, and had issue:
(1) Talbot Arthur Fitzpatrick Barnard (c.1880-1911), probably born late in 1880; educated at Edinburgh University and Penzance School of Mines; lived with his grandmother in Ealing (Middx); oil engineer; married, August 1906 at Bagillt (Flints), Marie Beatrice Morris, and had issue one daughter; murdered at Grozny, Chechnya (Russia), when he 'sacrificed his life in saving that of Mrs MacGarvey, the wife of the manager of the Anglo-Terek Petroleum Company's works', 22 February 1911; buried at Baku (Azerbaijan), 28 February but exhumed and reburied at Perivale (Middx), 16 March 1911; administration of goods granted, 11 April 1911 (estate £575);
(2) Sidney Edgar Barnard (b. c.1881), probably born late in 1881; emigrated to Vancouver, British Columbia (Canada), when he was living in 1921; married, Jan-Mar 1913 in Chelsea (Middx), Lillian May Tothill (b. 1890) and had issue three children; presumably died in Canada;
(3) Rosalie Winifred Barnard (1882-1969), born 8 October 1882; married, 26 April 1904 at Guestling (Sussex), Lawrence Ashburnham (1870-1944), fourth son of Sir Anchitel Ashburnham, 8th bt., and had issue one daughter; emigrated to America and died in Los Angeles, California (USA), 12 May 1969.
He inherited Kempston Hoo from his father in 1867, but sold it in 1884.
He died at the Villa Beaumarchais, Monte Carlo (Monaco), 16 September 1888. His widow was bankrupted in 1893, partly as a result of gambling at Monte Carlo; her date of death has not been traced and she may have remarried or gone abroad.

Barnard, Thomas (1830-1909). Younger son of Thomas Barnard (1784-1853) and his wife Anne, daughter of Thomas Fisher of Cambridge, banker, born 21 March and baptised at St Paul, Bedford, 22 March 1830. Educated at Bedford School. Banker at Bedford (retired 1908); Whig MP for Bedford, 1857-59. JP (by 1859) and DL (from 1862) for Bedfordshire. He was a personal friend of Samuel Whitbread (who was his fellow MP for Bedford) and the Duke of Bedford. He married, 24 February 1859, Isabella Henrietta Theodora (1832-1929), daughter of Henry Lawes Long of Hampton Lodge, Shackleford (Surrey), and had issue:
(1) Beatrice Catherine Isabella Barnard (1861-1947), born 24 November and baptised at Cople, 26 December 1861; lived at Cople House (Beds); died unmarried, 17 February 1947; will proved 3 July 1947 (estate £32,943);
(2) Muriel Eve Alexandra Barnard (1863-1942), born 14 April and baptised at Cople, 13 May 1863; married, 28 June 1887, William Reginald Currie (1860-1900), only son of Henry William Currie of Rushden House (Northants), and had issue one son; as a widow lived with her sister at Cople House and at Hambledon House, Child Okeford (Dorset); died 29 April 1942; will proved 5 June 1942 (estate £12,344);
(3) Hilda Florence Audrey Barnard (1864-1938), born 22 June and baptised at Cople, 5 October 1864; married, 18 July 1894 at St Saviour, Chelsea (Middx), Adm. Sir Hugh Evan-Thomas GCB KCMG CVO (1862-1928), but had no issue; died 21 February 1938; will proved 1 April 1938 (estate £46,867);
(4) Thomas Henry Barnard (1866-1916) (q.v.);
(5) Sybil Mary Theodora Barnard (1867-1947), born 22 December 1867 and baptised at Cople, 22 April 1868; lived at Haslemere (Surrey); died unmarried, 13 September 1947; will proved 21 November 1947 (estate £23,909);
(6) A daughter (b. & d. 1870), born 18 April 1870 but died unbaptised the same day;
(7) Elsie Marjorie Anne Barnard (1873-94), born 16 April and baptised at Cople, 27 May 1873; lived at Playden (Sussex); died unmarried, 19 April 1894.
He rented Cople House from 1855 and purchased the freehold from the Duke of Bedford before 1875.
He died at Cople House, 31 March 1909; his will was proved May 1909 (estate £230,122). His widow died at Cople House, 29 January 1929; her will was proved 22 April 1929 (estate £2,331).

Barnard, Thomas Henry (1866-1916). Only son of Thomas Barnard (1830-1909) and his wife Isabella, daughter of Henry Lawes Long of Hampton Lodge, Shackleford (Surrey), born 5 March and baptised at Cople, 8 May 1866. Educated at Eton (where he played cricket and was Master of Beagles) and Trinity College, Cambridge (matriculated 1885). Banker with Thomas Barnard & Partners in Bedford (managing director from 1908), but having encouraged all the young men in the firm's offices to join up in the First World War he was unable to sustain the workload and sold the business to Parrs Bank (later part of the Westminster Bank Ltd.) in 1915. JP for Bedfordshire; High Sheriff of Bedfordshire, 1914-15; County Treasurer of Bedfordshire, 1909-16. He was a keen member and Secretary of the Oakley Hunt. He married, 4 November 1897, Bertha Mary (1869-1959), daughter of Henry Lambton of Winslow (Bucks) and granddaughter of William Henry Lambton of Biddick Hall (Co. Durham), and had issue:
(1) Thomas Theodore Barnard (1898-1983) (q.v.);
(2) Mary Barnard (b. & d. 1899), born about 14 June 1899; died in infancy and was buried at Cople, 16 June 1899;
(3) Ralph Henry Barnard (b. 1901), baptised at Kempston, 1 February 1901; died in infancy;
(4) Vice-Admiral Sir Geoffrey Barnard (1902-74), born 12 November and baptised 31 December 1902; educated at Cheam and Royal Naval College, Dartmouth; an officer in the Royal Navy, 1916-59 (Sub-Lt., 1922; Cmdr, 1935; Capt., 1942; Rear-Adm., 1951; Vice-Adm., 1954), he served throughout the Second World War and was chief of staff to naval commanders-in-chief in the Mediterranean theatre, 1942-45 and of the Home Fleet, 1946-47; director of Royal Navy Tactical School, 1948-49; Deputy Chief of Naval Staff and Admirality Commissioner, 1953-54; naval attaché at British embassy in Washington (USA), 1954-56; President of Royal Naval College, Greenwich, 1956-59; appointed KCB, 1957; CBE, 1943; and DSO, 1942, 1945; awarded the Legion d'honneur and Croix de Guerre; lived at Bramdean Lodge (Hants); married, 26 June 1926, Julyan Frances (1903-89), younger daughter of Francis Crawley of Stockwood Park (Beds) and had issue one son and two daughters; died 19 December 1974; will proved 5 February 1975 (estate £15,218);
(5) Muriel Elizabeth Anne Barnard (1906-95), born 2 March 1906; married, 25 September 1948, William Harold Worrall of Ubley Park Farm, Chewstoke (Som.), but had no issue; died 31 January 1995; will proved 28 February 1995 (estate under £125,000);
(6) Gwendolen Bertha Barnard (1912-88), born 10 January 1912; artist; died unmarried, 24 April 1988; will proved 21 July 1988 (estate under £70,000).
He re-purchased Kempston Hoo in 1898. After his death his widow moved to Woodlands, Boars Hill (Berks) and the house was sold in about 1920.
He died at breakfast, 16 March 1916, having 'worked himself to death', according to his son, Sir Geoffrey Barnard; his will was proved 27 May 1916 (estate £201,302). His widow died 4 June 1959; her will was proved 25 August 1959 (estate £60,590).

Barnard, Thomas Theodore (1898-1983). Eldest son of Thomas Henry Barnard (1866-1916) of Kempston Hoo (Beds) and his wife Bertha Mary, daughter of Henry Lambton of Winslow (Bucks) and granddaughter of William Henry Lambton of Biddick Hall (Co. Durham), born 31 August and baptised at St Peter, Bedford, 26 September and again at Cople, 25 October 1898. Educated at Eton, Christ Church, Oxford (MA 1924) and Kings College, Cambridge (PhD, 1924). An officer in the Coldstream Guards, 1917-19 (Lt.) and 1940-45 (Capt.); awarded MC, 1919. Professor of Social Anthropology and Director of the School of African Life and Languages at the University of Cape Town (South Africa), 1926-34. The artist Paul Nash and his wife were friends of the family, and stayed on several occasions at Furzebrook House, although plans for him to illustrate a guidebook to the Blue Pool, discussed in 1937, never came to fruition. He was a keen naturalist, and his observations of rare species including the Dartford Warbler and Sand Lizard at the Blue Pool led to its designation as a Site of Special Scientific Interest in 1985. He married, 28 October 1924, Gillian Sarah (1904-61), only daughter of Lt-Col. the Hon. Antony Schomberg Byng DSO, and had issue:
(1) Jennifer Sarah Barnard (b. 1929), born 10 January 1929; proprietor of the Blue Pool Tea Room since 1946; unmarried; now living;
(2) Thomas Peregrine Barnard (b. 1930), born 20 November 1930; educated at Eton; after national service, he became an engineer, racing driver (chiefly with Lotus), boat builder, racing track designer, and inventor of the Barnard Formula Six racing car; published an autobiography, I gathered no moss (2011); unmarried and without issue; now living;
(3) Margaret Susan Barnard (1933-2015), born 22 March 1933; died unmarried, 10 June 2015; will proved 14 December 2015.
He purchased Furzebrook House, Wareham, on returning to England in 1934.
He died 20 August 1983; his will was proved 17 November 1983 (estate £21,427). His wife died 26 or 29 May 1961; her will was proved 10 August 1961 (estate £22,439).



Principal sources


Burke's Landed Gentry, 1952, p. 114; introduction to Bedfordshire Archives catalogue of Barnard papers (BD);
http://bedsarchives.bedford.gov.uk/CommunityArchives/Kempston/KempstonHoo.aspx
http://bedsarchives.bedford.gov.uk/CommunityArchives/Cople/CopleHouse.aspx


Location of archives


Barnard family of Bedford and Kempston: deeds, family and estate papers, and banking business papers, 13th-20th cents. [Bedfordshire Archives & Records Service, BD]
Vice-Adm. Sir Geoffrey Barnard (1902-75): diaries, correspondence and papers, 1916-66 [Imperial War Museum]; correspondence and papers, 1930-52 [National Museum of the Royal Navy].


Coat of arms


None recorded.


Can you help?


  • Does anyone know anything about the later years of Lillian Barnard (née Mayhew) (b. 1855), after she was bankrupted in 1893? I have been unable to find any record of her remarriage or death, and she may have gone abroad.
  • I should be most grateful if anyone can provide photographs or portraits of people whose names appear in bold above, and who are not already illustrated.
  • As always, any additions or corrections to the account given above will be gratefully received and incorporated. 


Revision and acknowledgements


This post was first published 15 October 2019.

Monday, 7 October 2019

(393) Barnard and Boldero of Cave Castle and Aspenden Hall

Boldero Barnard of Cave Castle
This family originated as merchants in Hull (Yorks ER) in the late 16th and early 17th centuries, and William Barnard (d. 1614), with whom the genealogy below begins, was Mayor there in 1602. He had eight sons, of whom three went on to play a prominent part in the civic affairs of Hull, and Henry Bernard (1597-1661) was mayor at the start of the Civil War, when both Parliament and the King appointed Governors of the town in an attempt to take control of it. Henry seems at first to have tried to keep both the would-be Governors out of the town, but the balance of opinion in the town clearly favoured the Parliamentary forces, and Hull later became one of their key strongholds. Henry's son, Sir Edward Barnard (1631-86), kt., was educated at Cambridge and Grays Inn, and became a barrister and later the Recorder of both Beverley (Yorks ER) and Hull. He moved to Beverley and later to North Dalton (Yorks ER), where he acquired property. His eldest son, Edward Barnard (c.1655-1714) succeeded him as recorder of Beverley and later of Hull too, and over time the family acquired a significant if scattered estate in the East Riding. Much of this was eventually concentrated in the hands of Sir Edward's long-lived youngest son, Dr. Henry Barnard (1677-1769), who practised as a doctor of medicine at Beverley. 

Sir Edward's daughter, Margaret Barnard (1657-1753), married William Lewyns (d. 1685) of Eske near Beverley, where they built a new manor house, which eventually passed to their daughters and was sold in 1710. Mary Lewyns, who like her mother died in 1753, married Edward Gale Boldero (1679-1761), a York lawyer who inherited Cornborough manor in Sheriff Hutton (Yorks) from his mother's family in 1717. Their eldest son, Lewyns Boldero (1708-83), who was a solicitor at Staples Inn in London and at Pontefract, seems to have been very successful and bought the manor of East Hall at South Cave (Yorks ER) in 1748 and the adjoining Faxfleet estate in 1750. He also became the heir to his great-uncle, Dr. Henry Barnard, when the latter died in 1769, on condition that he took the name Barnard. East Hall, where there was already a substantial house, provided the focus that had previously been lacking for the scattered Barnard estates, and Lewyns' son and heir, Henry Boldero Barnard (1755-1815) undertook further rationalisation, selling off some properties and buying the manor of West Hall and the rectory estate at South Cave. He also invested heavily in the enclosure of his property and undertook several building projects on the estate. East Hall was twice remodelled and enlarged, and on the latter occasion it was made Gothic and renamed Cave Castle.

When Henry Boldero Barnard died in 1815 the estate passed to his eldest son, Capt. Henry Gee Boldero Barnard (1789-1858), who promptly left the army and took over the estate. He and his wife had no children and when he died the estate passed to his widow (d. 1872) for life, although in practice she lived in London. By the time of her death, when Capt. Barnard's nephew, Charles Edward Gee Boldero Barnard (1822-94) inherited, the estate was perhaps rather run-down. Certainly Charles at once undertook a remodelling of the house. This had not quite been completed when, in January 1875, there was a serious fire which meant that renovations had to begin all over again. Undaunted, Charles -who evidently shared his grandfather's passion for building - went on to add new estate lodges and to rebuild many of the cottages in South Cave. Sadly, Charles had no son to inherit the estate on which have lavished so much care and attention, and his only surviving daughter, Ursula (1869-1938) was described in 1911 as 'feeble-minded from birth'. The castle was occupied by Charles' widow until 1912, and then passed to trustees, although it remained Ursula's home until 1925, when she and her carer moved to Bournemouth (Hants) and the contents of the castle, which included a valuable picture collection, were sold off. The trustees planned to sell the castle too, but not until 1937 was a buyer found, in the shape of a Hull jeweller, J.W. Carmichael, who pulled down the service wing and restored the rest. After wartime military use the house was sold and in the 1950s it became a country club; it remains an hotel today.

The fourth son of Edward Gale Boldero (1679-1761) was John Boldero (1712-89), who became a banker in London.  In the days before limited liability companies were invented, banking was a risky trade. It offered the potential to make huge profits, but also the potential liability for huge losses, and bankers were often victims of economic cycles beyond their control. By the early 1750s, John Boldero was wealthy enough to purchase the substantial Stapleton Park estate at Darrington (Yorkshire WR), where there was a fairly newly-built and substantial house. He sold this ten years later, in 1762, but whether this was because he needed to realise assets or simply because he had decided that an estate so far from London was incompatible with close attention to business we do no know. Both factors may have played a part, for he did not buy another country house until 1779, when he must have been thinking about retirement, and he then chose Aspenden Hall in Hertfordshire, which was much closer to London, and incidentally one of the largest houses in the county. When he died in 1789 the estate was entailed on his son, Charles Boldero (1758-1851), who was also a banker in London, in partnership with his brother-in-law, Sir Stephen Lushington, and others as Boldero, Lushington & Co. Charles was at that point unmarried, and evidently did not want or need such a large house, so the house was left to trustees who were instructed to let it until Charles married (which he did in 1815). Unfortunately, before he could marry and gain possession, Boldero Lushington & Co. collapsed, in one of the largest and most spectacular bankruptcies of the age. Because the estate was entailed, the creditors were not able to take possession of the Aspenden estate and sell it, but they could and did obtain possession of Charles' life interest and dispose of that. The scale of the firm's debts meant that the bankruptcy was never discharged, and Charles never regained possession of his property. A series of tenants occupied the house throughout the early 19th century and its condition deteriorated. Only when Charles died without issue in 1851 did the operation of the entail mean that his nephew, Sir Henry Lushington, gained possession, and he rebuilt the house: the Lushingtons will be the subject of a future post.


Cave Castle, South Cave, Yorkshire (East Riding)

Little is known of the original manor house, first mentioned in the early 16th century, except that its foundations were said to be 'of ancient origin'. In 1672 the house was taxed on fourteen hearths, indicating a quite substantial building, and a plan of c.1759 shows the house set in formal gardens of about ten acres. Henry Boldero Barnard (1755-1815), who inherited in 1783, enclosed the commons and open fields of South Cave in 1785-87 and seized the opportunity to lay out a larger landscaped park to the designs of William Emes in 1787. Emes expanded the formal canal in the gardens of the old house into an artificial lake. The house was enlarged and partly rebuilt in about 1791 as a three-storey, five by three bay classical house of yellow brick with stone dressings, and a lower service wing projecting at right-angles at the rear. A conversation piece by William Burgess, showing Mr & Mrs Barnard on the lawn in front of their new house, was painted soon afterwards to mark the completion of the house.


Cave Castle: detail of a painting by William Burgess, showing the house as rebuilt c.1791.
By 1794 Barnard had changed the name of the house to Cave Castle, which may signal his intention to change the style of the house to something more Gothick. This was done in 1802-09, to the designs of Henry Hakewill, and an engraving of 1810 shows the house immediately after work was completed. The original rectangular house was given pointed, traceried and mullioned windows, angle turrets and a crenellated porch. It was also enlarged to the north, and a lower service wing was built beyond the main block.
Cave Castle: engraving of 1810, showing the house as remodelled by Henry Hakewill in the Gothick style
Henry Boldero Barnard died in 1815 and his son, Henry Gee Barnard (1789-1858), succeeded to the estate. He and (more especially) his widow took less interest in it, and were often non-resident, and the condition of the house may have deteriorated during their tenure. In 1872 the estate passed to Henry's nephew, Charles Edward Gee Boldero Barnard (1822-94), who remodelled and enlarged the house c.1872-75 to the designs of Smith & Brodrick of Hull, at a cost of some £20,000. Work on the house was still not finished when a serious fire on 21 January 1875 destroyed the fittings and contents of the entrance hall and the rooms above it, but was fortunately prevented from spreading to the rest of the building. 


Cave Castle: the house soon after it was remodelled by Smith & Brodrick in 1872-75. Image: Cave Castle Hotel.
Smith & Brodrick moved the entrance from the south to the east side, and replaced a former tall Gothic arched recess in the centre of the east front with a projecting porch tower. On the former entrance front, the tall Gothick windows on the first floor were replaced with lower mullioned and transomed Tudor-style windows, and the original porch was raised and reworked to form a two storey canted bow window. The ground floor windows have transoms only in their upper parts, with plate glass below, which is an unfortunate effect.
Cave Castle: lodge and gateway of c.1870-72.
Further changes to the house included the addition of an extensive range of service accommodation on the north side (demolished in 1937) and the rebuilding of the lodges, which are really quite fun and more successful than the house.


The house was unoccupied from 1925-37, when it was sold to a Hull jeweller and restored. During the building work, an ancient well was found in the cellars which contained a number of Civil War period artefacts and an Anglo-Saxon shield boss. The castle was requisitioned for military use in the Second World War and has changed hands several times since 1950. It became a country club in the 1950s and is now a privately-owned hotel, country club and wedding venue. Little original decoration survives inside, but the large staircase has some elegant classical stucco.


Descent: sold before 1513 to John London (d. 1525); to son Oswald London (d. 1539); to sister, Cassandra, wife of John Vavasour (d. 1560); to son?, Edward Vavasour, who sold 1582 to Sir Thomas Danby (d. 1590); to son, Richard Danby (d. 1602); to son, Sir Thomas Danby, who sold 1649 to Francis Harrison; to son, Richard Harrison (d. 1682); to five daughters as co-heiresses, of whom Eleanor married Henry Washington, who in 1706-07 bought out the rights of her siblings; sold 1720 to John Idell; to son, John Idell, who sold 1748 to Lewyns Boldero (later Barnard) (1708-83); to son Henry Boldero Barnard (1755-1815); to son, Capt. Henry Gee Boldero Barnard  (1789-1858); to nephew, Charles Edward Gee Boldero Barnard (1822-94); to trustees for his widow (d. 1912) and daughter, Ursula Mary Florence Boldero Barnard (1869-1938); sold 1937 to James Wright Carmichael (1884-1966), but was requisitioned for military use by the Yorkshire Light Infantry, with a PoW camp in the grounds; sold c.1950 to Mrs. M.J. Radcliffe (fl. 1955); sold and turned into a country club, and later into an hotel.


Aspenden Hall, Hertfordshire


Jan Drapentier made an engraving of the house which was published in Chauncy's History of Hertfordshire in 1700. He depicts a double courtyard house which had obviously evolved over time. At its core was a medieval hall built for the Tany family, which became the middle range of the house, between the two courtyards. By 1556, when the house was set in a park and was described as 'in good estate and well repaired', the west range of the front court may have been built for the two external chimneystacks visible on this range in Drapentier's engraving look early-to-mid 16th century. In 1607 the house was sold to William and Ralph Freeman, two brothers who were merchants in London, and who both lived at Aspenden with their respective families. They were probably responsible for enlarging the house and may have divided it into two separate dwellings, with consequences for its future architectural development.


Aspenden Hall: Drapentier's engraving of the 1690s, showing the double courtyard house that had evolved at that time.
The house was inherited in the next generation by Ralph Freeman (d. 1665), William's son, who was High Sheriff of Hertfordshire in 1636; he 'made his House neat, his Gardens pleasant...[and] had a general insight in Architecture and Husbandry', and was presumably responsible for the construction of the south range which formed the main architectural focus of Drapentier's engraving. This was an Artisan Mannerist design of seven bays, with elaborately shaped gables over the ends and centre, a central classical porch, and mullioned and transomed windows of four lights in the end bays and two lights elsewhere. Either he or his son, another Ralph Freeman, probably built the classical loggia in front of the west range. Chauncy credited the younger Ralph, who was MP for the county, with having 'cased and adorned this Manor House with Brick' and improved the gardens. The house was taxed on 27 hearths in 1662.


Aspenden Hall: drawing by J.C. Buckler, 1832, showing the house as remodelled in the 18th century.
Image: Hertfordshire Archives & Local Studies DE/Bg/2/104.

A third Ralph Freeman (d. 1744) inherited the estate in 1714, and it was probably he who gave the house the appearance it presented when next recorded in 1832. This involved demolishing the mid 17th century south range that enclosed the front courtyard, traces of which are evident in the slight inward projection of the south end of the east and west wings. The wings themselves, and the medieval hall range, were given sash windows and a new fourteen-bay west front was constructed, with a second entrance at its centre. Buckler's drawing makes the most of the regularity of the facades: a slightly earlier view by Oldfield shows a large Gothic window still surviving in the hall block, and irregular fenestration on the inner face of the west wing, but Buckler's viewpoint conceals these features.


Aspenden Hall: the garden front and side elevation in 1957, when the house was derelict. Image: Historic England.

There is no indication that John Baldero (d. 1789) made any alterations to the early 18th century house which he purchased in 1779, although it seems quite likely that some modernisation of the interior took place. His widow seems to have occupied the house until her death in 1811, but with the collapse of the family bank the following year, the house came into the possession of creditors, who leased it for eleven years as a school (where Thomas Babington Macaulay was educated). By the time of Buckler's drawing in 1832, there are suggestions that the house was in poor condition, and when Sir Henry Lushington gained possession of the property in 1852, it was both old fashioned and in ill repair. He pulled it down and in 1856 rebuilt it on a much smaller scale, to the designs of an unknown architect. The new house had main fronts of seven bays of two storeys, with the roof concealed behind a parapet, which was surmounted by closely-spaced large ball finials. The elevations are articulated by pilasters with chanelled rustication, and the front has a pedimented centre with an enclosed Doric porch. The entrance hall was lined with late 17th or early 18th century panelling removed from the old house, and one room was decorated with pastoral scenes painted on canvases covering the walls. This house in turn was abandoned after the Second World War and sadly all the interiors and the urns from the parapet were lost when it was gutted in about 1963. The shell of the building was then used to house grain silos until it was restored to domestic use in about 1995 by the Pentangle Design Group, with entirely new interiors.


Aspenden Hall: the Victorian house as restored to domestic use c.1995. Image: Julian Osley. Some rights reserved.
Descent: sold 1607 to William Freeman and his brother Ralph Freeman (fl. 1636); to the former's son, Ralph Freeman (1600-65); to son, Ralph Freeman (1627-1714); to son, Ralph Freeman (1666-1742); to son, William Freeman (d. 1749); to daughter, Katherine (d. 1759), wife of Charles Yorke (1722-70), Lord Chancellor; ... sold 1779 to John Boldero (1713-89); to widow, Esther Boldero (d. 1811); to son, Charles Boldero (1758-1851), who became bankrupt 1812 and whose life interest was leased out by his creditors; to nephew, Sir Henry Lushington (1775-1863), 2nd bt., who rebuilt the house; to son, Sir Henry Lushington (1803-97), 3rd bt.; to son, Sir Henry Lushington Lushington (1826-98), 4th bt.; to son, Sir Arthur Patrick Douglas Lushington (1861-1937), 5th bt.... Geoffrey Peter Woods (fl. 2018).



Barnard family of Hull and Beverley


Barnard, William (d. 1614). Son of William Barnard (d. 1589?) of Hull and his wife Elizabeth. Merchant adventurer in Hull; a member of the borough council (Chamberlain, 1589; Mayor, 1602). He married and had issue:
(1) William Barnard; probably the eldest son; married, 26 October 1612 at Whitby (Yorks NR), Elizabeth, daughter of Leonard Bushell of Whitby, and had issue two sons and one daughter;
(2) Margaret Barnard (1585-1667), baptised at Holy Trinity, Hull, 19 December 1585; married, 13 January 1607/8 at Holy Trinity, Hull, John Ramsden (d. 1637), cloth merchant and twice Mayor of Hull, and had issue; buried at Holy Trinity, Hull, 19 January 1666/7;
(3) Rev. George Barnard (1587-1639), baptised at Holy Trinity, Hull, 10 September 1587; educated at St John's College, Cambridge (BA 1609/10; MA 1613); ordained deacon and priest, 1615; rector of West Heslerton, 1615-32 and Cowlam, 1617-32; prebendary of Southwell Minster, 1616-39; said to have married Mrs. Dorothy Hunter and had issue two sons and five daughters; died about 8 May 1639;
(4) Robert Barnard (1587-1659?), baptised at Holy Trinity, Hull, 10 September 1587; possibly the man of this name buried at Holy Trinity, Hull, 7 May 1659;
(5) John Barnard (1589-1656), baptised at Holy Trinity, Hull, 29 June 1589; twice Mayor of Hull, 1631-32 and 1640-41; he was dismissed as an alderman by the council of state in 1651, as his political loyalties were suspect; married, 1620 at Leeds (Yorks WR), Mary, daughter of Richard Sykes, alderman of Leeds, and had issue one son and one daughter; died 20 September and was buried at Holy Trinity, Hull, 23 September 1656;
(6) James Barnard (1591-1625?), baptised at Holy Trinity Hull, 24 January 1590/1; married, 1617 (licence), Margaret Pindar and had issue; perhaps the master mariner of this name who was buried at Holy Trinity, Hull, 24 April 1625;
(7) Peter Barnard (1592-1619), baptised at Holy Trinity, Hull, 10 September 1592; died unmarried and was buried at Holy Trinity Hull, 23 March 1618/9;
(8) Anne Barnard (1594-1623), baptised at Holy Trinity, Hull, 13 July 1594; married, 1615 at Holy Trinity, Hull, James Foxcroft of York; probably died in childbirth; buried at St Martin & St Gregory, York, 1623;
(9) Frances Barnard (d. 1686?); married 1st, 9 January 1616/7 at Holy Trinity, Hull, Thomas Johnson (d. 1619), and 2nd, 23 December 1619 at Holy Trinity, Hull, Robert Legard (b. 1582) of Anlaby and had issue; probably the woman of this name buried at Kirk Ella (Yorks ER), January 1685/6;
(10) Henry Barnard (1597-1661) (q.v.);
(11) Leonard Barnard (1600-65), baptised at Holy Trinity, Hull, 24 April 1600; alderman of Hull, 1656, and acted on several occasions as an envoy from the corporation of Hull to Parliament; married, 23 October 1633, Elizabeth, daughter of Sir John Lister, kt., MP, and had issue two sons and one daughter; buried at Holy Trinity, Hull, 17 June 1665;
(12) Mary Barnard (b. 1606), baptised at Holy Trinity, Hull, 12 October 1606.
He lived in Hull, but owned considerable property in Holderness, including the manor of Melton and the parish of Cowlam.
He is said to have died 1 November 1614. His widow's date of death is unknown.

Barnard, Henry (1597-1661). Seventh son of William Barnard (d. 1614), baptised at Holy Trinity, Hull, 30 November 1597. Mercer in Hull. Mayor of Hull, 1632-33 and again 1641-42, when Parliament and the King were vying for control of the town; his actions suggest he was a moderate supporter of the Parliamentarian cause. He married, 21 January 1628 at Holy Trinity Hull, Frances, daughter of Edward Richardson of Hull, and had issue:
(1) Frances Barnard (1629-76), baptised at Holy Trinity, Hull, 7 November 1629; married, 26 August 1654 at Holy Trinity, Hull, William Thompson (1629-92), MP for Scarborough, 1660-64, 1679-81, 1689-92, son of Stephen Thompson of Humbleton, and had issue five sons and six daughters; buried at Holy Trinity, Hull, 1 December 1676;
(2) Sir Edward Barnard (1631-86) (q.v.).
He lived in Hull.
He died 4 August, and was buried at Holy Trinity, Hull, 7 August 1661. His wife was probably the Frances Barnard buried at Holy Trinity, Hull, 6 July 1636.

Barnard, Sir Edward (1631-86), kt. Only son of Henry Barnard (1597-1661) of Hull and his wife Frances, daughter of Edward Richardson of Hull, baptised at Holy Trinity, Hull, 19 March 1630/1. Educated at Hull, St John's College, Cambridge (matriculated 1646) and Grays Inn (admitted 1648; called 1655; ancient, 1671). Barrister-at-law. Recorder of Hull, 1669-84, and of Beverley, 1663-86. He stood unsuccessfully for Parliament in the Hull constituency in 1661. Knighted by King Charles II at Whitehall, 6 December 1669. He married, about 1653, Margaret (d. 1697), daughter of Stephen Thompson of Humbleton, and had issue:
(1) Henry Barnard (1654-c.1675), baptised at Holy Trinity, Hull, 4 March 1653/4; educated at Hull, Grays Inn (admitted 1669) and St John's College, Cambridge (matriculated 1670); probably died before 1677;
(2) Edward Barnard (c.1655-1714) (q.v.);
(3) Margaret Barnard (1657-1753) (q.v.);
(4) Susannah Barnard (1660-63), born 6 February and baptised at St Mary, Beverley, 14 February 1659/60; died young and was buried at St Mary, Beverley, 1 June 1663;
(5) A child (b. & d. 1662); died unbaptised and was buried at St Mary, Beverley, 1 October 1662;
(6) William Barnard (1663-64), baptised at St Mary, Beverley, 3 July 1663; died in infancy and was buried at the same church, 19 November? 1664;
(7) Susanna Barnard (b. 1664), baptised at St Mary, Beverley, 14 October 1664; probably died young;
(8) John Barnard (1666-67), baptised at St Mary, Beverley, 12 December 1666; died in infancy and was buried at the same church, 28 June 1667;
(9) Mary Barnard (b. 1669), baptised at St Mary, Beverley, 1 February 1668/9; probably died young;
(10) William Barnard (1672-1718), baptised at St Mary, Beverley, 5 March 1671/2; educated at Grays Inn (admitted 1690); married, 12 July 1712 at Thornton Dale (Yorks), Mary, daughter of Andrew Perrot, alderman of York, but had no issue; died 28 January 1718 and was buried with his wife at Holy Trinity, Hull;
(11) Elizabeth Barnard (1673-99?), baptised at St Mary, Beverley, 13 April 1673; perhaps the woman of this name buried at Holy Trinity, Hull, 29 March 1699;
(12) Arabella Barnard (1674-1750?), baptised at St Mary, Beverley, 30 May 1674; perhaps the woman of this name buried at St George the Martyr, Bloomsbury (Middx), 18 March 1749/50;
(13) Dr. Henry Barnard (1677-1769) (q.v.).
He lived at Beverley and later at North Dalton (Yorks ER).
He was buried at St Mary, Beverley, 22 November 1686, where he is commemorated by a floor slab and where there was formerly an elaborate monument in the chancel. His widow was buried at St Mary, Beverley, 30 May 1697.

Barnard, Edward (c.1655-1714). Eldest son of Sir Edward Barnard (1631-86) and his wife Margaret, daughter of Stephen Thompson of Humbleton, born about 1655. Educated at Beverley and St John's College, Cambridge (matriculated 1671). He must also have had a legal training, but seems not to appear in the registers of any of the inns of court. Recorder of Beverley, 1686-1714 and of Hull, 1697-1714. He married 1st, c.1680, Anne (d. 1697), daughter of William Ramsden, MP for Hull, and 2nd, 1698 at Holy Trinity, Hull, Sarah, daughter of John Battie of Warmsworth (Yorks) and widow of Thomas Tomline, and had issue:
(1.1) Anne Barnard (b. 1682), baptised at North Dalton, 28 December 1682; married, 1713 (licence 6 January), Michael Barstow (1686-after 1762) of Ryton (who m2, 19 April 1724 at York Minster, Anne Marshall of York), son of Thomas Barstow of York, grocer, and had issue three daughters; died before 1724;
(1.2) Margaret Barnard (b. 1684), baptised at North Dalton, 20 January 1683/4; died young;
(1.3) Edward Barnard (1686-1730), baptised at North Dalton, 26 January 1685/6; died unmarried; buried at North Dalton, 22 May 1730;
(1.4) Frances Barnard (b. & d. 1687), baptised at North Dalton, 1 November 1687; died in infancy and was buried at North Dalton, 4 November 1687;
(1.5) Henry Barnard (b. 1689), baptised at North Dalton, 13 April 1689;
(1.6) Ramsden Barnard (1690-1749), baptised at North Dalton, 30 June 1690; educated at Grays Inn (admitted 1711); attorney and clerk of the sewers in Beverley; married 1st, 19 May 1715 at Luddington (Lincs), Anne, daughter of John Worsop of Redness and had issue one daughter (Anne Barnard (d. 1775), who died unmarried), and 2nd, 1730 (licence 9 September), Elizabeth Fothergill; buried at North Dalton, 25 March 1749;
(1.7) William Barnard (b. c.1692), born c.1692; educated at Beverley, St. John's College, Cambridge (matriculated 1709; BA 1712/3; MA 1716) and Middle Temple (admitted 1722);
(1.8) Susanna Barnard (1693-1715), baptised at North Dalton, 21 December 1693; died unmarried and was buried at St Mary, Beverley, 7 September 1715;
(1.9) Margaret Barnard (1695-1720), baptised at St Mary, Beverley, 2 November 1695; married, 9 July 1717 at St John, Beverley, Lovelace Gylby of Beverley, and had issue one daughter; died 17 October and was buried at St Mary, Beverley, 19 October 1720.
He lived at North Dalton.
He was buried at St Mary, Beverley, 7 July 1714. His first wife was buried at St Mary, Beverley, 19 August 1697. His widow's date of death is unknown.

Barnard, Henry (1677-1769). Son of Sir Edward Barnard (1631-86) and his wife Margaret, daughter of Stephen Thompson of Humbleton, baptised at St Mary, Beverley, 28 February 1676/7 . Educated at Sedbergh (Yorks WR) and St. John's College, Cambridge (matriculated 1695; MB, 1700). Doctor of medicine. He is said to have married Eleanor, daughter of Richard Lowther, MP for Appleby (Westmld), but had no issue.
He lived in Beverley
He died aged 93 on 25 June, and was buried at St Mary, Beverley, 30 June 1769; his will was proved at York, August 1769. His wife's date of death is unknown.

Barnard, Margaret (1657-1753). Eldest daughter of Sir Edward Barnard (1631-86) and his wife Margaret, daughter of Stephen Thompson of Humbleton, born 16 April and baptised at St Mary, Beverley, 20 April 1657. She married, 13 August 1677 at Holy Trinity Minories, London, William Lewyns [Lowin] (c.1646-85) of Eske (Yorks) and Enfield (Middx), and had issue:
(1) Edward Lewyns (d. 1707); died unmarried and without issue at sea off the Scilly Isles in the same shipwreck as Sir Cloudesley Shovell;
(2) Eleanor Lewyns (d. 1722?); married, 1707 (licence) at Naburn (Yorks), Charles Salkeld (c.1682-1767) of St Andrew, Holborn, attorney, son of William Salkeld of Swinhoe and Fallodon (Northbld), but had no issue; perhaps the woman of this name buried at Hornsey (Middx), 14 February 1722;
(3) Mary Lewyns (d. 1753); married, 17 January 1707/8 at York Minster, Edward Gale Boldero (1679-1761) [for whom see below], and had issue six sons and five daughters; died, 12 September 1753;
(4) Frances Lewyns; married, 17 January 1709 at Acomb (Yorks), Capt. Daniel Devoy (c.1682-1719), of York, and had issue one son (who died young).
She and her husband lived at Eske Manor, Beverley, where they built a new house c.1680.
She died in 1753 and was buried at St Mary, Beverley. Her husband was buried at Beverley, 13 January 1684/5 and administration of his goods was granted at York in 1685.



Boldero (later Barnard) family of Cave Castle



Boldero, Daniel (d. 1711). Youngest son of Henry Boldero (1603-61) of Dordrecht (Holland), Barton Turf (Norfk) and Hepworth (Suffolk), born about 1651.  Educated at Jesus College, Cambridge (matriculated 1667; MA 1669) and Lincolns Inn (admitted 1667/8). He married, 1674 (licence), probably at Highgate (Middx), Elizabeth (c.1655-1718), only daughter and heir of Edward Gale of York, and had issue:
(1) Sarah Boldero (b. 1676), baptised at Highgate (Middx), 9 January 1676/7; married, 18 January 1698/9 at St Michael Cornhill, London, Younger Cooke of Herefordshire, lawyer, but had no issue; living in 1718;
(2) Henry Boldero (1678-1716), baptised at Holy Trinity, Goodramgate, York, 20 August 1678; lived at Sheriff Hutton; died unmarried and without issue (some accounts say that he drowned) and was buried at Crambe (Yorks NR), 26 July 1716;
(3) Edward Gale Boldero (1679-1761) (q.v.);
(4) Elizabeth Boldero (b. 1680), baptised at Holy Trinity, Goodramgate, York, 13 January 1680/1; died young;
(5) John Boldero (b. 1681), baptised at Holy Trinity, York, 16 February 1681/2; died young;
(6) Ann Boldero (b. 1683), baptised at Holy Trinity, Goodramgate, York, 24 January 1682/3; died in infancy;
(7) Daniel Boldero (b. & d. 1684), baptised at Holy Trinity, Goodramgate, York, 29 January 1683/4; died in infancy and was buried in the same church, 25 July 1684;
(8) Ann Boldero (1685-1717?), baptised at Holy Trinity, Goodramgate, York, 26 February 1684/85; married, 26 May 1715 at Moor Monkton (Yorks), John Jackson 'of Sherbourne', and had issue one son; probably the woman of this name who was buried at St Laurence, York, 29 May 1717;
(9) Daniel Boldero (b. 1686), baptised at Holy Trinity, Goodramgate, York, 3 June 1686; probably died young;
(10) Henrietta Maria Boldero (b. 1688), baptised at St Saviour, York, 8 February 1688;
(11) Elizabeth Boldero (1691-92), baptised at St. Saviour, York, 17 December 1691; died in infancy and was buried at St Helen, York, 28 April 1692;
(12) Elizabeth Boldero (b. 1693), baptised at St. Saviour, York, 30 March 1693; married, 4 March 1716 at Alborough (Yorks), Thomas Marshall of Hutton;
(13) John Boldero (b. & d. 1694), baptised at St Helen, York, 3 April 1694; died in infancy and was buried in the same church, 18 April 1694.
He lived at Barton Turf, and later settled at York. He was heir to his uncle, Edmund Boldero DD, Master of Jesus College, Cambridge. His wife inherited the manor of Cornborough from her father.
He died at York and was buried at St Helen, Stonegate, York, 9 December 1711; his will was proved at York, February 1711/2. His widow was buried at St Anne, Stonegate, York, 24 January 1717/8; her will was proved at York, 5 May 1718.

Boldero, Edward Gale (1679-1761). Son of Daniel Boldero (d. 1711) and his wife Elizabeth, daughter of Edward Gale of York, baptised at Holy Trinity, Goodramgate, York, 13 November 1679. Educated at Grays Inn (admitted 1703). Barrister-at-law. He married, 17 January 1707/8 at York Minster, Mary (1683-1753), eldest daughter and co-heiress of William Lewyns of Eske (Yorks), and had issue including:
(1) Lewyns Boldero (later Barnard) (1708-83) (q.v.);
(2) William Boldero (1710-11), baptised at Holy Trinity, Goodramgate, York, 1 July 1710; died in infancy and was buried at the same church, 25 January 1710/11;
(3) Edward Gale Boldero (1711-72), baptised at Holy Trinity, Goodramgate, York, 9 October 1711; educated at Grays Inn (admitted 1744); said to have lived at Eltham (Kent); married, 9 June 1752 at the Grosvenor Chapel, Mayfair, London, Ann Brass, who is said to have brought him a dowry of £10,000, and had issue one daughter; buried at St Andrew, Holborn, 20 June 1772; his will was proved 2 July 1772;
(4) John Boldero (1712-89) (q.v.) [for whom see Boldero of Aspenden Hall below];
(5) Mary Boldero (1715-16), baptised at Holy Trinity, Goodramgate, York, 25 October 1715; died in infancy and was buried at the same church, 23 May 1716;
(6) William Boldero (b. 1717), baptised at York, 20 June 1717; probably died young;
(7) Mary Boldero (1719-89), baptised at York, 15 February 1719; married, 13 January 1749 at Pontefract, Edward Hutchinson (1722-82), probably son of William Hutchinson, joiner, of Tanshelf, Pontefract; buried at Gateshead (Co. Durham), 3 August 1789;
(8) Henry Boldero (1722-89), baptised at Holy Trinity, York, 25 September 1722; banker in Cornhill and Lombard St., London and a member of the Worshipful Company of Goldsmiths; lived at 36 Kensington Square, 1772-79 and later at Aviary Hill, Eltham (Kent); married, 19 May 1753 at St Olave, Old Jewry, London, Elizabeth (1724-58), daughter of James Randall of Old Jewry, London, and had issue one son and two daughters; died 12 June and was buried at St Mary Woolnoth, London, 21 June 1789; will was proved 4 July 1789;
(9) Elizabeth Boldero (1723-72), baptised at York, 3 November 1723; married, 19 November 1751 at Ackworth (Yorks WR), John Fallowfield (d. 1780) of Hull, distiller; buried at St Mary Lowgate, Hull, 3 June 1772;
(10) twin, Anne Boldero (b. 1725), baptised at York, 4 October 1725; probably died young;
(11) twin, Margaret Boldero (b. & d. 1725), baptised at York, 4 October 1725; died in infancy and was buried at St Martin, Coney St., York, 23 December 1725.
He inherited the manor of Cornborough (Yorks NR) from his mother in 1717. His wife inherited one third of the manor of Eske from her father in 1685; she and her husband sold it in 1710.
He was buried at Pontefract, 14 November 1761. His wife died in 1753 and was buried at St Mary, Beverley, where she is commemorated by a monument.

Boldero (later Barnard), Lewyns (1708-83). Eldest son of Edward Gale Boldero (1679-1761) and his wife Mary, eldest daughter of William Lewyns of Eske (Yorks), baptised at York, 16 December 1708. A wealthy and successful attorney at Staples Inn, London, and Pontefract (Yorks WR); admitted to Grays Inn, 1753. He assumed the name and arms of Barnard by royal licence in 1769, on inheriting the estate of his great-uncle, Dr. Henry Barnard. He married, 2 January 1755 at Pontefract, Anne (1729-97), daughter of William Popplewell of Monk Hill, Pontefract, and had issue:
(1) Henry Boldero Barnard (1755-1815) (q.v.);
(2) Anne Barnard (1756-1827), born 20 September and baptised at South Cave, 22 September 1756; as a young woman, she was a noted beauty; married, 6 July 1780 at Tottenham (Middx), Robert Smith (1752-1838) MP FRS FSA, later 1st Baron Carrington, (who m2, 19 January 1836, Charlotte (1770-1849), third daughter of John Hudson of Bessingby (Yorks) and widow of Rev. Walter Trevelyan) and had issue one son and eight daughters; died 9 February 1827 and was buried at St Peter, Nottingham (Notts);
(3) Lewyns Boldero Barnard (1758-1821) of Walkington; educated at Grays Inn (admitted 1778); married, 22 December 1800 at Walkington, Mary Owston (d. 1801) and had issue one daughter; died 19 February 1821 and was buried at St Mary, Beverley, where he is commemorated by a floor slab;
(4) Mary Barnard (1760-1834), baptised at South Cave, 5 October 1760; despite her advancing years she was described as 'rich, beautiful and accomplished' when she married, 20 January 1808 at Pontefract, James Banks (d. 1814) of Wakefield (Yorks WR), mayor of Pontefract, 1809 and said to be a cousin of Sir Joseph Banks; she died without issue, 19 January 1834 and was buried at St Mary, Beverley; her will was proved in the PCC, 22 April 1834.
He bought the East Hall estate at South Cave in 1748 and the Faxfleet estate in the same parish in 1750. In 1769 he inherited the property of his great-uncle, Dr. Henry Barnard, in the East Riding, but East Hall remained the centre of his estate.
He died 6 March 1783 and was buried at St Mary, Beverley; his will was proved in the PCC, 7 June 1783. His widow died 14 September 1797 and was buried at St Mary, Beverley.

Barnard, Henry Boldero (1755-1815). Son of Lewyns Boldero (later Barnard) (1708-83) of South Cave, and his wife Anne, daughter of William Popplewell of Pontefract (Yorks WR), born 12 October and baptised at Pontefract, 3 November 1755. Educated at Harrow, Trinity College, Cambridge (matriculated 1774; BA 1778; MA 1781) and Lincoln's Inn (admitted 1774; called 1781). Barrister-at-law; JP for the East Riding of Yorkshire. He began the family collection of pictures (dispersed at a sale in 1925), and was much occupied with improving the estate and building. His works included enclosing much of the estate; laying out the park and twice remodelling the house; and building a new Market House in South Cave in 1796 (reputedly to his own designs). He married, 23 April 1788 at St Mary, Beverley, Sarah Elizabeth (1770-1832), eldest daughter and co-heir of Roger Gee of Bishop Burton (Yorks ER), and had issue:
(1) Capt. Henry Gee Boldero Barnard (1789-1858) (q.v.);
(2) Capt. Charles Lewyns Barnard (1790-1815), born 19 January and baptised at North Cave (Yorks ER), 1 February 1790; educated at Harrow, 1802-05; an officer in the army (Ensign 1805; Lt. 1806; Capt., 1807), who saw action in Germany and Spain (where he was severely wounded) before being killed at the Battle of Waterloo, 18 June 1815; he died unmarried and was buried on the battlefield but is commemorated by a monument in South Cave church; his will was proved in the PCC, 1 December 1815;
(3) Rev. Edward William Barnard (1791-1828) (q.v.);
(4) Sarah Ellinor Barnard (1810-52), born 11 August 1810; married, 10 October 1832 at Christ Church, Hull, Joseph Delpratt (1808-84) of Old Charlton (Kent), only surviving son of Samuel Delpratt of Jamaica, and had issue two sons and ten daughters; died 7 January and was buried at St Thomas, Woolwich (Kent), 13 January 1852. 
He inherited the East Hall estate at South Cave from his father in 1783 and renamed it Cave Castle. He bought the West Hall estate and the rectory estate at South Cave in 1784 and over the following years inclosed his property at South Cave and laid out a park to the design of William Emes. He remodelled and enlarged the house c.1791, and further remodelled it in the Gothick style to the designs of Henry Hakewill in 1802-09.
He died 6 February 1815 and was buried at South Cave, where he is commemorated by a monument; his will was proved 14 April 1815. His widow died 28 November 1832 and is commemorated by a mural tablet at South Cave.


Capt. Henry Gee Barnard
(1789-1858)
Barnard, Capt. Henry Gee Boldero (1789-1858). Eldest son of Henry Boldero Barnard (1755-1815) and his wife Sarah Elizabeth, eldest daughter and co-heir of Roger Gee of Bishop Burton (Yorks ER), born 22 February and baptised at Beverley, 24 February 1789. Educated at Eton, 1802-05. An officer in the Scots Greys (Cornet, 1806; Lt., 1807; Capt., 1813; retired 1815). He married, 8 April 1834 at St. James, Paddington (Middx), Elizabeth Mary (1808-72), daughter of Henry Elliott of Clonmel (Co. Tipperary), but had no issue.
He inherited Cave Castle from his father in 1815. At his death it passed to his widow for life and then to his nephew, Charles Edward Gee Boldero (1822-94). His widow seems actually to have lived in a house near Portman Square in London.
He died 23 April 1858 and was buried at South Cave; his will was proved 20 May 1858 (effects under £8,000). His widow died in London, 16 February 1872 and was buried at South Cave; her will was proved 29 July 1872 (effects under £12,000).

Barnard, Rev. Edward William (1791-1828). Youngest son of Henry Boldero Barnard (1755-1815) and his wife Sarah Elizabeth, eldest daughter and co-heir of Roger Gee of Bishop Burton (Yorks ER), born 16 March and baptised at North Cave (Yorks ER), 19 March 1791. Educated at Harrow, 1805-09 and Trinity College, Cambridge (matriculated 1810; BA 1813; MA 1817). Ordained deacon, 1814 and priest, 1815; curate of Brantingham, 1815-17; vicar of South Cave (Yorks ER), 1817-28 and of Brantinghamthorpe, 1822-28. A scholar and minor poet, he collected materials for a history of the church of England and for a life of the Italian poet, Marc-Antonio Flaminio; he was author of Trifles, imitative of the chaster style of Meleager (1818), The Protestant Bedesman (1822) and of a Translation of the poems of Flaminio (issued posthumously, 1829). His portrait was painted by Charles Edridge in 1802. He married, 25 April 1821 at Hunmanby (Yorks ER), Philadelphia Frances Esther (1802-80), daughter of Ven. Francis Wrangham, Archdeacon of the East Riding, and had issue including:
(1) Charles Edward Gee Boldero Barnard (1822-94) (q.v.);
(2) Rosamond Barnard (1823-93), born at Brantinghamthorpe, 22 May, and baptised at South Cave, 25 May 1823; lived with her younger sister in Fulham (Middx); died unmarried, 1 July, and was buried at South Cave, 5 July 1893; will proved 2 September 1893 (effects £5,442);
(3) Caroline Barnard (1824-92), born at Brantinghamthorpe, 23 May, and baptised at South Cave, 26 May 1824; lived with her older sister in Fulham (Middx); died unmarried, 21 November, and was buried at South Cave, 25 November 1892; will proved 17 February 1893 (effects £5,199);
(4) Emily Barnard (1826-28), baptised at South Cave, 8 September 1826; died in infancy and was buried at St John the Baptist, Chester, 8 January 1828.
He lived at Brantinghamthorpe (Yorks ER).
He died at Chester, 10 January, and was buried in the lady chapel of Chester Cathedral, 12 January 1828. His widow married 2nd, 1848, Rev. Charles Watkin Wynne Eyton (1799-1870), rector of Aston Clinton (Bucks); she died 25 October 1880 and her will was proved 26 November 1880 (effects under £14,000).

Barnard, Charles Edward Gee Boldero (1822-94). Son of Rev. Edward William Barnard (1791-1828), vicar of South Cave, and his wife Philadelphia Frances Esther, daughter of Ven. Francis Wrangham, Archdeacon of the East Riding, born 23 March 1822. Educated at Rugby, Trinity College, Cambridge (admitted 1840 but did not reside) and Middle Temple (admitted 1842; called 1847). Barrister-at-law, but did not practise; JP for the East Riding of Yorkshire. He seems to have inherited his grandfather's 'building gene', for he remodelled Cave Castle, and reconstructed it after a fire in 1875, built new estate lodges, and rebuilt much of the village in a distinctive semi-timbered style. He married, 5 June 1862 at St George, Hanover Sq., London, Sophia Letitia (1830-1910), fifth daughter of Hon. Andrew Godfrey Stuart of Lisdhu (Co. Tyrone), second son of Andrew Thomas Stuart, 1st Earl of Castlestewart, and had issue:
(1) Sophia Isobel Barnard (b. & d. 1867), born 14 January 1867 but died the same day;
(2) A son, born 25 April 1868, but died unnamed the same day;
(3) Ursula Mary Florence Boldero Barnard (1869-1938) (q.v.).
He inherited the Cave Castle estate from his uncle, Capt. Henry Gee Boldero Barnard, in 1858. At his death the estate passed to his widow for life and was then placed in trust for his surviving daughter.
He died 14 August 1894; his will was proved 6 December 1894 (effects £9,291). His widow died 28 September 1910; her will was proved 17 November 1910 (estate £125,469).

Barnard, Ursula (k/a Mysie) Mary Florence Boldero (1869-1938). Only surviving child of Charles Edward Gee Boldero Barnard (1822-94) and his wife Sophia Letitia, fifth daughter of Hon. Andrew Godfrey Stuart, born at Coombe House (Glos), 4 July, and baptised at Westbury-on-Trym, Bristol, 2 August 1869. The 1911 census noted that she had been 'feeble minded since birth' and after the death of her mother she lived with her cousin, Henrietta Stuart (1864-1938), as a carer and companion. She was unmarried and without issue.
She lived at Cave Castle until 1925, when she moved to Bournemouth. Her trustees then sold most of the contents of the house, but their efforts to sell the house failed until it was sold in 1937 to J.W. Carmichael.
She died 24 June 1938; administration of her goods was granted 16 February 1939 (estate £2,662).


Boldero family of Aspenden Hall



Boldero, John (1713-89). Fourth son of Edward Gale Boldero (1681-1761) of Grays Inn and his wife Mary (c.1680-1753), eldest daughter and co-heiress of William Lewyns of Eske (Yorks), baptised at York, 7 January 1713. Banker in London. He married, 28 April 1752 at Marlborough (Wilts), Hester (1728-1811), daughter of Charles Stone of Bath, and had issue: 
(1) Hester Boldero (1753-1830), baptised at Darrington (Yorks WR), 17 April 1753; married, 1771, Sir Stephen Lushington (1744-1807), 1st bt., of South Hill Park (Berkshire)Director of the East India Company (Chairman, 1790-91, 1795-6, 1799-1800), 1782-1805; MP for Hedon 1783-84, Helston 1790-96, Mitchell 1796-1802, Penrhyn 1802-06 and Plympton Erle 1806-07, and had issue; buried at Aspenden, 23 December 1830; will proved 2 June 1831;
(2) John Boldero (1756-1800), born 12 August 1756 and baptised at Darrington the same day; died unmarried and was buried at Aspenden, 10 August 1800;
(3) Edward Boldero (b. 1757), baptised at Darrington, 4 August 1757; banker in London with his brother Charles; living in 1815 but died unmarried;
(4) Charles Boldero (1758-1851) (q.v.);
(5) Sophia Boldero (1761-1827), baptised at Darrington, 10 February 1761; married, 1784 (licence 6 February) (separated 1796), Thomas Hibbert (1745-1819) of Jamaica and later of Chalfont House (Bucks), son of Robert Hibbert of Stockfield Hall, but had no issue; she and her husband were both painted by Gainsborough before they separated in 1796 and Thomas bought for her a house called Westcott Hill, near Dorking, where she lived till her death; she also leased a house in London; she remained on excellent terms with her husband and kept his portrait at Westcott, while he kept hers at Chalfont; buried at Chalfont St Peter, 24 February 1827; her will was proved 17 March 1827;
(6) Rev. William Boldero (1768-1832), baptised at St. Andrew, Holborn, 7 June 1768; educated at Eton and Trinity Hall, Cambridge (admitted 1785; matriculated 1790; BA 1791; MA 1794); ordained deacon, 1792 and priest, c.1794; rector of Woodford (Essex), 1794-1832 and Carlton (Cambs), 1805-32; chaplain in ordinary to King George IV; accidentally drowned in a pond in his garden while strolling in his garden on a dark night after a convivial evening, 25 April and was buried at Carlton, 2 May 1832.
He bought Stapleton Hall, Darrington (Yorks WR) between 1753 and 1756, but sold it in 1762 to Edwin and Daniel Lascelles. He bought Aspenden Hall (Herts) in 1779 and the manor of Aspenden in 1785, and he also had a house in Bedford Square, London.
He died in his sleep at his house in London, 17 April, and was buried at Aspenden, 27 April 1789, where he is commemorated by a mural tablet; his will was proved 9 May 1789. His widow died in 1811 and was buried at Aspenden; her will was proved 6 May 1811.

Boldero, Charles (1758-1851). Third son of John Boldero (1713-89) and his wife Hester, daughter of D. Stone of Bath, born 19 July and baptised at Darrington (Yorks WR), 21 July 1758. Banker, in partnership with Sir Stephen Lushington and others, as Boldero, Lushington & Co., who became bankrupt in 1812. He married, 12 October 1816 at St Marylebone (Middx), Johanna Whitmell (c.1767-1863), but had no issue.
He inherited Aspenden Hall from his father in 1789 as life-tenant under an entail. This father's trustees were instructed to let the estate until he married, and he seems to have rented Hare Street House near Buntingford (where he sold his interest in 1802). With his bankruptcy his creditors seized his interest, which they sold in 1822. At his death the property passed to his nephew, Sir Henry Lushington (1795-1863), 2nd bt. After leaving Aspenden he lived at Cambridge Terrace, Hyde Park, London.
He died aged 93 on 21 August 1851; his will was proved 2 September 1851. His widow died aged about 96 on 14 November 1863; her will was proved 30 November 1863 (effects under £12,000).


Principal sources


Burke's Landed Gentry, 1937, p. 103; J.G. Hall, A history of South Cave, 1892;  Sir N. Pevsner & D. Neave, The buildings of England: Yorkshire - York and the East Riding, 2nd edn., 1995, pp. 699-703;   https://archiveshub.jisc.ac.uk/search/archives/4b1c205c-12d7-34a8-a45f-0d8a152522db


Location of archives


Barnard of Cave Castle: deeds, estate and family papers, 1401-1945 [Hull History Centre, U/DDBA]


Coat of arms


Quarterly, 1st & 4th argent a bear rampant sable, muzzled or (for Barnard); 2nd & 3rd, per pale, or and azure, a saltire counterchanged surmounted by another couped counterchanged (for Boldero).
Later generations of the family further quartered this shield (1st and 4th) with that of Gee (2nd & 3rd): Gules a sword in bend, argent. This can be seen here.


Can you help?


  • I should be most grateful if anyone can provide photographs or portraits of people whose names appear in bold above, and who are not already illustrated.
  • As always, any additions or corrections to the account given above will be gratefully received and incorporated. 


Revision and acknowledgements


This post was first published 7 October 2019 and was updated 10 October 2019.