Tuesday, 12 January 2021

(442) Bateman of Hartington Hall, Breadsall Mount and Morley Manor

Bateman of Hartington
At the time of Domesday Book, compiled in 1086, the vill of Hartington was divided into two manors, the northern of which later came into the possession of the Cavendish family, Dukes of Devonshire (hence the secondary title of that family being Marquess of Hartington). The southern manor formed part of an estate granted in 1170 to the Abbey of the Minoresses of St. Clare without Aldgate, London, and by the mid 15th century the property was held on lease from the nuns by Richard Bateman, a member of a family from South Wingfield (Derbys). As far as we can tell, his descendants continued to be lords farmer of the estate until the Dissolution of the Monasteries, when his grandson Hugh Bateman (fl. 1540), with whom the genealogy below begins, was able to purchase the freehold. Hugh's son, Richard Bateman (d. by 1601) seems to have been content for his status to be described as yeoman, but he was wealthy enough to give his four sons a good start in life. His eldest son married well, but died in his father's lifetime, leaving only daughters, so it was a younger son, Hugh Bateman (1554-1617) who inherited Hartington. His other sons, Anthony (d. 1593) and Robert (1561-1645) were apprenticed to trades in London. Anthony was a grocer, but died fairly young. The youngest son, Robert, was apprenticed to a skinner and built a highly successful and profitable business based in Mincing Lane, apparently initially importing furs from Russia, but rapidly moving on to invest in a wide range of overseas trading companies. He was Master of the Skinners Company in 1620-21 and soon afterwards became an Alderman of the City Corporation. In 1626, he was appointed to the lucrative office of Chamberlain of the City, in which he secured re-election every year until 1643. The affairs of the city, and his positions at different times with the East India and Levant companies, among others, meant that he had to give up trading on his own account, and by the 1620s he was living on the profits of his investments. His five sons who survived to adulthood all became merchants too. The eldest, Richard (1600-68), followed him as Master of the Skinners, 1643-44 and Alderman, 1648-49; Robert (1610-35) became a merchant in Rotterdam, but died young; William (1614-1706?), Anthony (1616-87) and Thomas (1622-85) traded as merchants in partnership and, like their father, were active in public affairs and the overseas trading companies. William and Anthony were knighted in 1660, and Thomas, who acquired land in Middlesex, Essex and Norfolk and was Lord Mayor in 1663-64, was made a baronet in 1664. All three men, however, were major sufferers as a result of the Great Fire of London. William and Thomas seem to have survived financially, but Sir Anthony was bankrupted and imprisoned for debt, until the City corporation found a pension of 30 shillings a week for him. Perhaps largely as a result of the Great Fire, none of the brothers founded a landed family.

Hugh Bateman (1554-1617), who inherited Hartington from his father in the late 16th century, was also steward of the Cavendish manor in Hartington, and was able to buy additional lands in Middleton and elsewhere. His fortune allowed him to build the present Hartington Hall in 1611, although he may never have lived in it himself, as his will and his burial place show he spent his last years in nearby Youlgreave (Derbys). He divided his lands between his sons, the eldest of whom, Richard Bateman (1586-1651) inherited Hartington. Richard still regarded himself as a yeoman, although it is evident that many others in similar circumstances would have asserted their gentry status with confidence. He had three sons, the eldest of whom, Hugh Bateman (1616-82) was brought up as a gentleman, being sent to Cambridge and then Grays Inn, where he qualified as a barrister in 1645. He was a Parliamentarian during the Civil War, and although little is known about his activities during the Commonwealth years, he thought it prudent to obtain a personal pardon from Charles II in 1660. He inherited the Hartington estate in 1651 but lived chiefly in London and later Derby, and the estate appears to have been managed by his brother John (1619-1713?). Hugh married three times but the only child to survive, a daughter, was born after he died. By his will, his estate passed to John's son, Richard Bateman (1649-1731), a protestant dissenter who sustained a religious meeting at Hartington until his death. Richard was married but had no children, so on his death the estate passed to his first cousin once removed, Hugh Bateman (1690-1777) of Derby, a solicitor who was also Town Clerk. This Hugh was the great-grandson of Richard Bateman (1586-1651); his grandfather, Robert (1622-58), had been a successful haberdasher in London who married a baronet's daughter; and his father, Hugh Bateman (1656-1727) was, like him, a lawyer in Derby. Hugh inherited not only the Hartington estate but also, in 1754, the more extensive estate around Morley and in Derby which had belonged to the Sacheverells and later the Osbornes (his first wife was an Osborne and he inherited under the terms of their marriage settlement, even though she was long dead).
St Mary's Gate House, Derby.

The Osborne property included St Mary's Gate House in Derby, which became his principal home. Sadly, he demolished the old Sacheverell manor house in Morley in 1757, and did not replace it.

The acquisition of the Sacheverell and Osborne estates put the family on a new footing, for although Hugh continued to live in Derby, he was now unmistakeably a landed gentleman. He outlived his sons, and on his death in 1777 his property passed to his grandson, Sir Hugh Bateman (1756-1824), 1st bt., who was educated at Oxford and Lincoln's Inn. He may have qualified as a barrister (his younger brother certainly did) and seems to have had an interest in political questions, although he never stood for Parliament and his only political pamphlet was  not published until 1816. It is therefore obscure why, in 1806, he was made a baronet. By this date, such honours were normally granted for public or political service of some form, and yet Hugh seems to have done nothing to qualify himself. Not only was he raised to the baronetcy, he received a further mark of favour in being allowed a special remainder to ensure the continuance of the title after his death, since he had no sons. Unusually, this remainder was made out to the male descendants of his daughters, rather than to his brother and his heirs, even though Sir Hugh and his brother Richard (1757-1821) seem to have been very close. The provision took the baronetcy out of the family, to the Scotts of Great Barr, but the bulk of Sir Hugh's property (he had sold St Mary's Gate House in about 1800) descended to Richard's sons, Richard Thomas Bateman (1794-1853) and Thomas Osborne Bateman (1809-74). R.T. Bateman married a Roman Catholic and seems to have been a convert to that faith himself; he and his wife produced fourteen children and lived at various addresses around Bath (Som.). He seems to have taken little interest in his Derbyshire estates, which were further divided on his death between his sons Hugh Willoughby Bateman (1823-60), a bachelor who also lived in Bath, and Thomas Keelinge Bateman (1831-87). Hugh received the ancestral estate at Hartington, but promptly sold it to the 6th Duke of Devonshire, who owned the other manor at Hartington. Thomas received a major part of the former Osborne property at Morley and returned to Derby to live. Although he died relatively young, his only son, Hugh Alleyne Sacheverell Bateman (1860-96), was already of age. He lived at first in a rented property at Etwall Lodge, but he decided to build a new family seat at Morley Manor. Work began in 1894 to the designs of the leading architect, G.F. Bodley, but H.A.S. Bateman died before construction was finished. He left his property to his widow, who completed the house and occupied it with her second husband until 1938. It was then sold, and later became an orphanage before being restored as a private house after 1997.

The sale of Hartington to the Duke of Devonshire in 1853 was not the end of the family's involvement with that estate, for in 1857 Thomas Osborne Bateman (1809-74), one of the younger sons of Richard Bateman (1757-1821), who had inherited the other moiety of the Morley estate and who seems to have done well out of early investment in the railways, persuaded the Duke to let him buy it back. Thomas, who was (to the great surprise of his friends) married that year, modernised and enlarged the house in 1861-66, and at the same time he built a new house called Breadsall Mount on the part of the Morley estates which he had inherited much earlier. In his later years, he became somewhat eccentric and prone to picking quarrels over trifling matters, and this instablity eventually led to his dismissal as a magistrate. He died in 1874 and his only son, Frederick Osborne Fitzherbert Bateman (1859-1917) came of age in 1880. He found he could not afford to run two large houses, and he eventually let out Hartington Hall about 1900. In 1907, however, he sold Breadsall Mount and used the capital raised to modernise Hartington, where he returned to live in about 1910. After he died of pneumonia in 1917, his widow and children continued to live at Hartington until 1934, when his son, Osborne Robert Sacheverel Bateman (1887-1970) leased it to the Youth Hostels Association. In 1948 he sold them the freehold of the house, which continues to be a Youth Hostel today.

Hartington Hall, Derbyshire

The present stone house is dated 1611 on the lintel of the front door and the rainwater hoppers, although the absence of string-courses and the off-centre entrance make it look a little earlier than that. It was built for Hugh Bateman (1554-1617), and seems to have incorporated part of its predecessor (see a blocked doorway and irregular masonry on the east side) but it  was formed in the typical H-shape of Elizabethan and Jacobean manor houses.

Hartington Hall: entrance front
The entrance front has three wide gables, and a variety of three-, four- and five-light mullioned windows with hoodmoulds, although many of these were altered in the 19th century. The central gable represents the width of the small hall, and a tiny window above the offset doorway probably indicates the former existence of a staircase here. The interior still retains several original large stone chimneypieces, some 17th century oak panelling, which has probably been repositioned, and a few simple geometrical plaster ceilings. The house in its original form was quite small, and horribly underheated: in 1670 John Bateman paid tax on only eight hearths. 

Hartington Hall: the west front, as extended and rebuilt in 1861-66 by H.I. Stevens of Derby and in 1910-11.
In 1861-66, Thomas Osborne Bateman (1809-74) rebuilt the west side of the house as a garden front and added new ranges of service accommodation to the north and west, forming a courtyard with further outbuildings beyond. His architect was Henry Isaac Stevens of Derby, then in partnership with the Lancashire gentleman architect, Frederick Josias Robinson. The alterations were designed to make the old house a great deal more comfortable, for the number of hearths was more than doubled, and the new rooms combine the scale and comfort of the Victorian period with the decorative motifs of the Elizabethan era, including large carved oak chimneypieces, some rather stiff plasterwork, and armorial stained glass recording the family's most profitable marriage alliances, with the Osborne and Sacheverell families.

At the beginning of the 20th century, Hartington was let as a private hotel for about a decade, until in 1910-11, F.O.F. Bateman modernised it further, putting in modern plumbing, central heating and electric light, and adding a two-storey canted bay to the centre of the west front, so that he could move back in. His widow continued to live in the house until 1934, when she let it to the Youth Hostels Association, who eventually bought the freehold in 1948 and have since made further changes to the interior. 

Descent: Abbey of Poor Clares leased to Robert Bateman; to William Bateman, who purchased the freehold c.1540; to son, Richard Bateman (d. by 1601); to son, Hugh Bateman (1554-1617), who rebuilt it 1611; to son, Richard Bateman (1586-1651); to son, Hugh Bateman (1616-82); to nephew, Richard Bateman (1649-1731); to first cousin once removed, Hugh Bateman (1690-1777); to grandson, Sir Hugh Bateman (1756-1824), 1st bt.; to nephew, Richard Thomas Bateman (1794-1853); to son, Hugh Willoughby Bateman (1823-60), who sold to William Spencer Cavendish, 6th Duke of Devonshire; sold 1857 to Thomas Osborne Bateman (1809-74); to son, Frederick Osborne Fitzherbert Bateman (1859-1917); to widow (d. 1946) for life and then to son, Osborne Robert Sacheverell Bateman (1887-1970), who sold 1948 to Youth Hostel Association (tenants since 1934).

Breadsall Mount, Derbyshire

A frankly rather dull two-storey house with gabled attics in a simplified neo-Jacobean style, built in 1863 by Henry Isaac Stevens and Frederick Josias Robinson of Derby for Thomas Osborne Bateman (1809-74), for whom Stevens was also working at the same time at Hartington Hall.  The house was built as a new centre for the part of the Sacheverell-Osborne estate around Morley which Bateman had inherited, and the grounds were laid out as a small park. It consisted of a main block of three-by-three wide bays with an entrance front on the north, two square bay windows on the west (perhaps originally only of one storey), and a single off-centre canted bay on the south, attached to a long service wing running out to the east. On the south side this terminated in a loggia overlooking the gardens. There was also a rather fine classical stable block, standing a little to the north of the house. Inside, the decoration is said to have been rather heavy and ponderous, as only the Victorians could be, but with a high standard of craftsmanship.

Breadsall Mount: the house from the south in the mid 20th century.
The Batemans had let the house by 1895, and in 1907 sold it to Joseph Hill, a local mining engineer. When he moved out in 1927 he sold it to the newly-created diocese of Derby to serve as the Bishop's Palace, and the armorial bearings of the first bishop, the Rt. Rev. Edward Courtenay Pearce, were carved over the gabled porch. The house was sold by the diocese in 1968 and acquired by Derby corporation, which left it empty and allowed it to be vandalised, before demolishing it in June 1970 to make way for a housing estate.

Descent: built for Thomas Osborne Bateman (1809-74); to son, Frederick Osborne Fitzherbert Bateman (1859-1917); sold 1907 to Joseph Hill, who sold 1927 to diocese of Derby; sold 1968 to Derby Corporation; demolished 1970. The house was let 1895-c.1905 to Mrs. Radcliffe.

Morley Manor (aka Hayes Lodge), Morley, Derbyshire

Hugh Bateman (1690-1777) acquired the Morley estate by marriage in 1754 and in 1757 demolished the manor house, which was described as 'a very large old building, adjoining the church', and which had been taxed on 16 hearths in 1670. Hugh and his successors, who lived chiefly in Derby, had no particular need for a gentry seat at Morley, and they did not rebuild, but within a few years of the great Sacheverell holdings
Morley Manor: the plan and elevation published in 1899.

around Morley being divided in the 19th century, new houses were built on both portions
. Morley was constructed to the designs of the eminent church architect, George Frederic Bodley in 1894-99 for Hugh Alleyne Sacheverell Bateman (1860-96), although the client died before the house was finished, and it was completed by his widow, who inherited the estate.

Morley is a large but compact neo-Jacobean house, with a highly varied and irregular two-storey main front topped by five straight-coped gables with finials. No two bays are quite the same, and the house breaks forward irregularly under the gables, with bay windows of different widths and an entrance porch. Inside, the house has fine quality neo-Jacobean panelling, and a 16th century farmhouse overmantel.

Morley Manor: the house as restored after 1997.
In 1958, the house became a Dr. Barnardo's charity children's home, which operated until 1997, when the house was restored and returned to private occupation.

Descent: built for Hugh Alleyne Sacheverell Bateman (1860-96); to widow, Anna (d. 1947), later wife of Cmdr. Russell Lister-Kaye (d. 1960), who sold 1938.. sold 1956 to Dr. Barnardo's Homes; sold 1997 to Tony Walker... sold to Peter Marples (b. 1964); for sale, 2018.

Bateman family of Hartington Hall, Breadsall Mount and Morley Manor


Bateman, William (fl. 1540). Son of Robert Bateman, lord farmer of the Hartington estate which he leased from the Abbey of the Minoresses of St. Clare without Aldgate, London. He married [forename unknown] Sleigh, and had issue:
(1) Richard Bateman (d. by 1601) (q.v.).
He purchased the freehold of the Hartington estate at the Dissolution of the Monasteries.
His date of death is unknown. His wife's date of death is unknown.

Bateman, Richard (d. by 1601). Son of William Bateman of Hartington and his wife [forename unknown] Sleigh. Yeoman farmer at Hartington. He married Ellen (b. c.1528), daughter of William Topleyes of Tissington (Derbys), and had issue:
(1) William Bateman (d. 1601), of Woodhouse, near Tutbury (Staffs); married [forename unknown] Bayley of Bradnoke (Staffs), and had issue four daughters; will proved 15 June 1601;
(2) Anthony Bateman (d. 1593); grocer in London; married, 20 October 1583 at St Dunstan-in-the-East, London, Elizabeth Heard, and had issue one son (William Bateman (1585-1653), citizen and grocer of London); administration of goods granted in PCC, 1593;
(3) Hugh Bateman (1554-1617) (q.v.);
(4) Robert Bateman (1561-1644) (q.v.).
He inherited the Hartington estate from his father.
He was probably dead before his eldest son made his will in 1601. His wife's date of death is unknown.

Bateman, Robert (1561-1644). Fourth son of Richard Bateman (fl. 1561) and his wife Ellen, daughter of William Topleyes of Tissington (Derbys), baptised at Hartington, 8 September 1561. He was apprenticed in the Skinners Company in London, 1581 (Freeman, c.1590; Assistant, 1606-c.1640; Auditor 1613, 1619; Warden 1614-15, 1617-18; Master 1620-21), and evidently also had some legal training, as he was employed as an attorney in the Court of Common Pleas, 1607. He was principally a merchant, however, and was in partnership with Robert Myddelton, who had been an apprentice with him in the 1580s, shared a house in Mincing Lane with him, and became his brother in law. He invested in many of the overseas trading companies, including the East India Co. from 1600 (Solicitor and committee member, 1614-20; Auditor 1615-20; 1620-44); the Levant Co., from 1605; the Virginia Co., 1609-c.1623, the French Co., 1611; the N.W. Passage Co., 1612, and the Massachusetts Bay Co., 1629. He was a Merchant Adventurer by 1621, and also Deputy Governor of the New River Co. 1619-20 and a Governor of St Thomas' Hospital, Southwark, 1611-26. Alderman and Chamberlain of the City of London, 1626-43; MP for Weymouth 1614 and for City of London, 1621-26. He married 1st, 23 September 1594 at Radipole (Dorset), Joan (d. 1603), daughter of John Mounsell of Weymouth (Dorset), and 2nd, 1604 at St Olave, Old Jewry, London, Elizabeth (d., 1663), daughter and co-heir of John Westwray, draper, of London and Barking (Essex), and had issue (with a stillborn son buried 11 July 1596):
(1.1) Nicholas Bateman (b. 1597), baptised at St. Dunstan-in-the-East, London, 18 May 1597; probably died in infancy;
(1.2) Ellen Bateman (b. 1598), baptised at St. Dunstan-in-the-East, 13 May 1598; probably died in infancy;
(1.3) Richard Bateman (1600-68?), baptised at St Dunstan-in-the-East, London, 3 February 1600; presumably apprenticed to his father; citizen and skinner of London (Master of the Skinners Co., 1643-44); merchant trading with France in partnership with James Gould of Dorchester (Dorset); a member of the East India Company (committee member, 1638-39, 1641-47, 1648-51) and the Levant Co. (assistant, 1641-43, 1645-46, 1647-48); Commissioner for Customs, London, 1645-48; Alderman of London, 1648-49; granted a pension of £1 a week by the Common Council of the City of London, 1667; married 1st, 15 June 1626 at St Mary Bothaw, London, Christian (d. 1631/2), daughter of William Stone of London, and had issue two daughters; married 2nd, 2 August 1632, Elizabeth, daughter of Robert Burdett of London, merchant, and had issue one or two daughters; probably the man of this name whose will was proved in the PCC, 4 December 1668;
(2.1) Jane Bateman (b. & d. 1606), baptised at St Dunstan-in-the-East, London, 4 January 1606/7; died in infancy and was buried at St Dunstan-in-the-East, 11 January 1606/7;
(2.2) Elizabeth Bateman (1607-65?), baptised at St Dunstan-in-the-East, London, 6 December 1607; married, 29 January 1627, Thomas Newman (d. by 1650) of London, skinner, and had issue at least one daughter; perhaps the woman of this name buried at St Andrew Holborn (Middx), 24 July 1665;
(2.3) Susan Bateman (1609-86), baptised at St Dunstan-in-the-East, London, 26 March 1609; married 1st, 5 May 1629 at St Dunstan-in-the-East, London, Robert Angell (d. 1636) of London; married 2nd, Andrew Riccard, but had no further issue; buried at St Olave, Hart St., London, 17 March 1685/6; will proved in the PCC, 26 March 1686;
(2.4) Robert Bateman (1610-35), baptised at St Dunstan-in-the-East, London, 14 October 1610; merchant in Rotterdam and a member of the Society of Merchant Venturers there; died about December 1635; will proved 6 January 1636;
(2.5) John Bateman (1612-17), baptised at St Dunstan-in-the-East, London, 9 February 1611/2; died young and was buried at St Dunstan-in-the-East, 23 May 1617;
(2.6) Sir William Bateman (1614-1706?), kt., of London and Carlton (Kent), baptised at St Dunstan-in-the-East, London, 17 July 1614; educated at Merchant Taylors School, 1625-28; apprenticed to his father, 1632; citizen and skinner of London; merchant in business with his brothers; knighted, 26 May 1660; suffered severely by the Great Fire of London in 1666; a member of the East India Company (committee member, 1654-57) and Levant Company (assistant, 1651-53); Alderman of the City of London, 1657, 1660-65; a Commissioner for Lieutenancy of City, 1660; married 1st, Elizabeth, daughter and heir of Alderman Robert Cheslyn and had issue six sons and four daughters; married 2nd, 1663, Mary, daughter of Edward Harris of Margaretting (Essex) and widow of John Rivett, and had further issue one son; living in 1686 and perhaps the man of this name buried at St Dunstan-in-the-East, 1706; 
(2.7) Sir Anthony Bateman (1616-87), kt., baptised at St Dunstan-in-the-East, London,  17 November 1616; educated at Merchant Taylors School, 1625-28; apprenticed to his brother-in-law, Thomas Newman; citizen and skinner of London; merchant in partnership with his brothers; a member of the East India Company (committee member, 1645-63) and Levant Company (assistant, 1645-46, 1651-56. 1658-59); Col. of the Red Regiment, 1659-67; knighted, 26 May 1660; a Commissioner for Lieutenancy of City, 1660; Alderman of London, 1657-67 (Sheriff, 1658; Lord Mayor, 1663-64), but was removed from office 'for divers considerations', 5 March 1666/7, perhaps related to the severe losses he suffered by the Great Fire of London, which led to his failure in business; by July 1675 he was bankrupt and a prisoner in King's Bench, and was voted a pension of 30/- a week by the City corporation; married, 6 January 1645 at Charlton (Kent), Elizabeth (1626-73), daughter of Alderman Thomas Russell of London, and had issue; buried at Charlton (Kent), 2 July 1687;
(2.8) Hugh Bateman (1621-22), baptised at St Dunstan-in-the-East, London, 29 April 1621; died in infancy and was buried at St Dunstan-in-the-East, 10 August 1622;
(2.9) Sir Thomas Bateman (1622-85), 1st bt., of Whitton (Middx) and Howe Hall (Norfk), baptised at St Dunstan-in-the-East, London, 29 September 1622; citizen and skinner of London (freedom, 1644); merchant in partnership with his brothers; Alderman of London, 1662-64; High Sheriff of Cambridgeshire and Huntingdonshire, 1657-58; created a baronet, 31 August 1664; he suffered severely by the Great Fire of London in 1666; married, 26 August 1652 at All Hallows, London Wall, London, Elizabeth (d. 1679), only daughter of [forename unknown] Middleton, but had no surviving issue; baronetcy expired on his death; buried at St Margaret, Lothbury, London, 13 October 1685; administration of goods granted in PCC, 1685.
He lived in Mincing Lane, London, but also acquired property in Weymouth (Dorset) and Barking (Essex) through his marriages. Shortly before his death he bought the manor of Little Stanbridge (Essex), which he left to one of his younger sons.
He died 11 December 1644 and was buried in the chancel of St Dunstan-in-the-East, London, 31 December 1644; his will was proved 2 August 1645. His first wife was buried at Melcombe Regis (Dorset), 9 February 1602/3. His second wife was living in 1662 but her will was proved in the PCC, 1663.

Bateman, Hugh (1554-1617). Third son of Richard Bateman (fl. 1561) and his wife Ellen, daughter of William Topleyes of Tissington (Derbys), baptised 13 March 1554. Yeoman and  steward to Sir William Cavendish, 1st Earl of Devonshire. He married, 13 March 1584, Margaret (1553-1612), daughter of John Sleigh of Hartington, and had issue:
(1) Richard Bateman (1586-1651?) (q.v.);
(2) Grace Bateman (1590-1667), said to have been born or baptised at Hartington, 9 March 1589/90; married, George Parker (1592-1675) of Park Hall, Caverswall (Staffs), and had issue three sons and two daughters; buried at Caverswall (Staffs), 30 July 1667;
(3) Robert Bateman (1591-1642), baptised 13 March 1590/1; inherited his father's property at Middleton; married, 18 May 1612, Elizabeth (d. 1644), daughter of William Ryddiard of Middleton, and had issue four sons and two daughters; died in Derby, 25 April 1642;
(4) William Bateman (1598-1642), baptised 20 June 1598; inherited Meadow Pleck from his father; married, 14 February 1617, Dorothy, daughter of John? Beresford, and had issue four sons and three daughters; buried 25 April 1642;
(5) Helen Bateman (d. 1609), said to have died unmarried, 30 November 1609;
(6) Mary Bateman (d. 1608); said to have died unmarried, and been buried 28 October 1608;
(7) Anne Bateman (1598-1609); said to have been baptised 28 March 1598 and to have died young and been buried, 18 October 1609.
He inherited the Hartington estate from his father. He lived at Meadow Pleck, Youlgreave, but built Hartington Hall in 1611.
He was buried at Youlgreave (Derbys), 24 February 1616/7; his will was proved 28 November 1617. His wife was buried at Youlgreave, 17 January 1612/3.

Bateman, Richard (1586-1651?). Eldest son of Hugh Bateman (1554-1616) and his wife Margaret, daughter of John Sleigh of Hartington, baptised 16 March 1586. Yeoman farmer at Hartington. He married, 1 May 1614 at Hartington, Anne (b. 1591), daughter of John Beresford of Alstonefield (Staffs), and had issue:
(1) Dorothy Bateman (b. & d. 1615), baptised at Hartington, 19 March 1614/5; died in infancy and was buried, 12 December 1615;
(2) Hugh Bateman (1616-82) (q.v.);
(3) John Bateman (1619-1713?) (q.v.); 
(4) Robert Bateman (1622-58) (q.v.);
(5) Mary Bateman (1625-83), baptised at Hartington, 1 November 1625; married, 5 November 1646 at Leek (Staffs), William Finney (1626-68?) of Leek, and had issue; said to have died at Leek, 11 June 1683;
(6) William Bateman (b. & d. 1628), baptised at Hartington, 24 August 1628; died in infancy and was buried at Hartington, 6 September 1628;
(7) William Bateman (1629-31), baptised at Hartington, 29 October 1629; died young and was buried at Hartington, 11 December 1631;
(8) Margaret Bateman (b. 1632), baptised at Hartington, 24 June 1632; married Richard Heap of Wirksworth (Derbys).
He inherited Hartington Hall from his father in 1616.
He is said to have died in 1651. His wife's date of death is unknown, although she could be the Jane Bateman buried at Hartington on 1 November 1669 (the names Jane and Anne being to some extent interchangeable in the 17th century).

Bateman, Hugh (1616-82). Eldest son of Richard Bateman (1586-1651?) and his wife Anne, daughter of John Beresford of Alstonefield (Staffs), baptised at Hartington, 2 February 1616. Educated at Derby School, St John's College, Cambridge (matriculated 1633), Staples Inn and Grays Inn (admitted 1637/8; called 1645; ancient, 1662). Barrister-at-law. He was a Parliamentarian during the Civil War, and was pardoned by King Charles II for his actions, 1660. He married 1st, 21 February 1648 at All Saints, Derby, Mary (d. 1665?), daughter of Francis Clay of Higham; 2nd, 1665 (licence 10 May), Elizabeth (b. c.1647), daughter of William Bateman of London, and 3rd, 1680 (licence 22 June) at St Alkmund, Derby, Elizabeth (d. 1746), daughter and co-heir of John Dalton of Derby, and had issue:
(1.1) Richard Bateman; died without issue, and probably young;
(1.2) Hugh Bateman; died without issue, and probably young;
(1.3) Elizabeth Bateman (d. 1673); died unmarried and was buried at All Saints, Derby, 19 April 1673;
(2.1) A son (b. & d. 1667); died in infancy and was buried at All Saints, Derby, 15 September 1667;
(3.1) Elizabeth Bateman (1682?-1756), born posthumously; died unmarried, 1756.
He inherited Harrington Hall from his father in 1651, but lived chiefly in London and later in Derby. At his death it passed to his nephew, Richard Bateman (1649-1731).
He was buried at All Saints, Derby, 15 April 1682, where he is commemorated by a monument. His first wife may be the woman of this name for whom administration of her goods was granted at Lichfield in 1665/6. His second wife died before 1680. His widow died in 1746.

Bateman, John (1619-1713?). Second son of Richard Bateman (1586-1651) and his wife Anne, daughter of John Beresford of Alstonefield (Staffs), baptised at Hartington, 2 December 1619. Yeoman. He married, 4 February 1645, Mary (d. 1670?), daughter of John Woodhouse of Bakewell (Derbys), and had issue:
(1) Richard Bateman (1649-1731) (q.v.);
(2) Ann Bateman (b. 1651), baptised at Hartington, 3 June 1651; married Nicholas Harrison of Casefield and had issue three daughters;
(3) Mary Bateman (b. 1653), baptised at Hartington, 15 September 1653; married Robert Greenaway of London; living in 1658;
(4) John Bateman (c.1655-57); died young and was buried at Hartington, 27 October 1657;
(5) Hannah Bateman (b. 1657), baptised at Hartington, 24 November 1657; married Thomas Harrison of Monyash (Derbys);
(6) Grace Bateman (b. 1659), baptised at Hartington, 18 [month illeg.] 1659; married William Oldfield of Litton;
(7) Hugh Bateman (b. 1661), baptised at Hartington, 5 May 1661;
(8) Robert Bateman; married, 3 December 1702 at Bakewell, Eliza, daughter of Thomas North of Bakewell, and had issue one son and two daughters; will proved 14 February 1707?;
(9) Dorothy Bateman; married John Dakeyne;
(10) Elizabeth Bateman; married, 30 December 1691 at Crich (Derbys), Francis Prince "of Harple";
(11) Martha Bateman (d. 1737); married, December 1695 at Hartington, Rev. Thomas Alkin (1670-1732), vicar of Hartington, 1694-1704 and Mayfield (Staffs), 1703-32, and had issue; buried at Mayfield, 13 February 1737;
(12) Margaret Bateman (fl. 1730); living unmarried at Bakewell in 1730.
He lived at Wollescote in Hartington.
He was living in 1674 and could he be the John Bateman senior of Hartington buried at Hope, 1713. His wife may be the woman of this name buried at Hartington, 29 August 1670.

Bateman, Richard (1649-1731). Eldest son of John Bateman (b. 1619) and his wife Mary, daughter of John Woodhouse of Bakewell (Derbys), baptised at Hope (Derbys), 13 May 1649. He was a protestant dissenter in religion, and maintained a meeting at Hartington which he desired his heir to continue, 'if convenient'. He married, 23 April 1685 at Carsington (Derbys), Elizabeth (1661-1720), daughter of Robert Hayward of Carsington, but had no issue.
He apparently inherited Hartington Hall from his uncle Hugh in 1682. At his death it passed to his first cousin once removed, Hugh Bateman (1690-1777).
He died 23 August and was buried at Hartington, 26 August 1731; his will was proved 26 June 1732. His wife was buried at Hartington, 8 March 1720.

Bateman, Robert (1622-58). Third son of Richard Bateman (1586-1651) and his wife Anne, daughter of John Beresford of Alstonefield (Staffs), baptised at Hartington, 8 September 1622. Citizen and haberdasher of London. He married, about 1650, Anne (b. 1621), third daughter of Sir William Thorold MP, 1st bt. of Marston (Lincs), and had issue:
(1) Ann Bateman (b. & d. 1652), baptised 2 March 1651/2; died in infancy and was buried at St Mary Magdalene, Milk St., London, 27 August 1652;
(2) William Bateman (b. 1654), born 29 June 1654 and was baptised at St Mary Magdalene, Milk St., London, on the same day; died in infancy;
(3) Richard Bateman (1655-56), baptised 13 November 1655; died in infancy and was buried at St Mary Magdalene, Milk St., London, 19 July 1656;
(4) Hugh Bateman (1656-1727) (q.v.);
(5) Elizabeth Bateman (b. 1658), baptised 18 March 1658; perhaps died young.
He lived in London.
He was buried 'in the middle [a]isle' at St Mary Magdalene, Milk St., London, 30 December 1658; his will was proved 24 March 1658/9. His widow married 2nd [forename unknown] Cutts; her date of death is unknown.

Bateman, Hugh (1656-1727). Only son of Robert Bateman (1622-58) of London and his wife Anne, daughter of Sir William Thorold, 1st bt., of Marston (Lincs), born 23 September and baptised at St Mary Magdalene, Milk St., London, 5 October 1656. Solicitor in Derby and Alderman of Derby corporation. He married, 24 December 1683, Mary (d. 1705), daughter of John Taylor of Radbourne (Derbys), and had issue:
(1) Elizabeth Bateman (1684-93), baptised at All Saints, Derby, 16 October 1684; died young and was buried at All Saints, Derby, 11 December 1693;
(2) Mary Bateman (b. 1686), baptised at All Saints, Derby, 13 June 1686; married, 16 December 1715 at Allestree (Derbys), 'John Girton, an Officer' [recte John Girling (d. 1744), a Lieutenant in the 1st Foot Guards]; buried at St Werburgh, Derby, 10 November 1767; will proved in the PCC, 4 December 1767;
(3) Frances Bateman (1687-1776), baptised at All Saints, Derby, 13 August 1687; died unmarried, and was buried at St Werburgh, Derby, 8 March 1776; will proved in the PCC, 18 May 1776;
(4) Anne Bateman (1688-1779), baptised at All Saints, Derby, 16 August 1687; died unmarried and was buried at St Werburgh, Derby, 12 July 1779; administration of her goods (with will annexed) granted to her niece Elizabeth, 27 October 1779;
(5) Hugh Bateman (1690-1777) (q.v.);
(6) John Bateman (1693-94), baptised at All Saints, Derby, 8 April 1693; died in infancy and was buried at All Saints, Derby, 7 March 1693/4;
(7) Elizabeth Bateman (1696-1775?), baptised at All Saints, Derby, 6 September 1696; died unmarried, 1775?, but her burial not traced; will proved in the PCC, 15 February 1775;
(8) John Bateman (1698-99), baptised at All Saints, Derby, 1 November 1698; died in infancy and was buried at All Saints, Derby, 20 February 1698/9;
(9) Rev. Dr. Robert Bateman (1700-76), baptised at All Saints, Derby, 20 July 1700; educated at Queens' College, Cambridge (matriculated 1718; BA 1722; MA 1725; MD 1732); Fellow of Queens' College, Cambridge, 1722-44 but was described as 'of Ipswich' (Suffk) at the time of his first marriage; ordained deacon and priest, 1748; rector of St Columb Major (Cornw.), 1748-76 and St Mawgan (Cornw), 1761-76; married 1st, 13 February 1743/4 at St Benet, Paul's Wharf, London, Mary Greenwood (d. 1745?) of Winchester; married 2nd, 8 August 1761 at St Columb Major, Elizabeth (1736-1800), daughter of Giles Hamley, and had issue two daughters; buried at St Columb Major, 13 July 1776; will proved 20 August 1776;
(10) Richard Bateman (b. 1702), baptised at All Saints, Derby, 19 March 1702; died in infancy.
He lived in All Saints parish, Derby.
He was buried at All Saints, Derby, 16 October 1727. His wife died 25 March 1705.

Bateman, Hugh (1690-1777). Second son of Hugh Bateman (fl. 1683) and his wife Mary, daughter of John Taylor of Radbourne (Derbys), baptised at Derby, 5 October 1690. Solicitor in Derby; Town Clerk of Derby. He married 1st, 21 April 1718 at All Saints, Derby, Elizabeth (1697?-1723), daughter and eventual co-heir of John Osborne of Derby and his wife Elizabeth, daughter and co-heir of William Sacheverell of Barton in Fabis (Notts) and Morley (Derbys), and 2nd, 4 November 1724 at Breadsall (Derbys), Elizabeth (d. 1756), 'a lady of the strictest piety and virtue', daughter of Samuel Hacker of Duffield (Derbys), and had issue:
(1.1) Richard Bateman (1719-62) (q.v.);
(1.2) Hugh Bateman (1719-58), baptised at All Saints, Derby, 1 January 1719/20; apprenticed to John Newdegate of the Court of Chancery as an attorney, 1737, but did not remain in that profession and was later an officer in 2nd Regiment of Dragoon Guards and later 76th Foot (Lt., 1753; Capt., 1756); died unmarried in Ireland, 1758; will proved at Lichfield, 17 October 1758;
(1.3) John Bateman (1721-38), born 12 August and baptised at All Saints, Derby, 2 September 1721; died unmarried and was buried at All Saints, Derby, 17 June 1738;
(2.1) Elizabeth Bateman (1725-81), baptised at All Saints, Derby, 24 October 1725; lived latterly at York; died unmarried and was buried, 3 March 1781; will proved in the PCC, 29 March 1781.
He lived in Derby, but in 1731 he inherited the Hartington Hall estate from his first cousin once removed, Richard Bateman (1649-1731) and in 1754 the estates of the Sacheverell and Osborne families at Derby, Breadsall, Morley and elsewhere in right of his first wife; this property included St Mary's Gate House, which became his principal home. He demolished the old manor house at Morley in 1757.
He died 24 November and was buried at All Saints, Derby, 1 December 1777; his will was proved in the PCC, 31 January 1778. His first wife was buried at All Saints, Derby, 16 July 1723. His second wife died 3 February 1756.

Bateman, Richard (1719-62). Eldest son of Hugh Bateman (1690-1777) and his first wife Elizabeth, daughter of John Osborne of Derby, born 17 January and baptised at All Saints, Derby, 5 February 1718/9. He married 1st, 28 May 1753 at Gateshead (Co. Durham)*, Ann (1725-54), daughter of Christopher Soulsby of Chollerton (Northbld.), and 2nd, 11 June 1755 at All Saints, Derby, Catherine (k/a Kitty) (d. 1776), 'a most amiable young lady, of fine Accomplishments, and a good Fortune', daughter of William Fitzherbert of Tissington (Derbys), and had issue:
(2.1) Sir Hugh Bateman (1756-1824), 1st bt. (q.v.);
(2.2) Richard Bateman (1757-1821) (q.v.).
He lived at Derby and Hartington Hall.
He died in his father's lifetime, and was buried at All Saints, Derby, 14 July 1762; his will was proved in the PCC, 10 June 1763. His first wife was buried at All Saints, Derby, 30 April 1754. His widow died 6 February and was buried at All Saints, Derby, 19 February 1776.
* Older sources give Ann's surname as Soresby, which was the name of a Derby family in the 19th century; but a press report in the Derby Mercury, 8 June 1753, stating that he had married at Newcastle a young lady of Hexham, makes it virtually certain this is the correct marriage.

Sir Hugh Bateman (1756-1824), 1st bt. 
Bateman, Sir Hugh (1756-1824), 1st bt.
Elder son of Richard Bateman (1719-62) and his second wife, Catherine, daughter of William Fitzherbert of Tissington (Derbys), born 21 March 1756. Educated at Derby School, University College, Oxford (matriculated 1774) and Lincoln's Inn (admitted 1777). Usually said to be a barrister-at-law* and political writer; author of Thoughts upon the causes of the present distress of the country, and remedy (1816). JP and DL for Derbyshire. He was created a baronet, 15 December 1806, with a special remainder in default of male issue to the heirs male of his daughters. He married, 4 February 1786 at Barton-under-Needwood (Staffs), Temperance (1767-1857), daughter of John Gisborne of St Helen's House, Derby and Yoxall Lodge (Staffs) by his wife Ann, daughter and co-heir of William Bateman of Derby, and had issue:
(1) Richard Sacheverell Bateman (1788-94), born 11 June and baptised at Sutton Coldfield (Warks), 20 August 1788; died young, in the lifetime of his father, 17 June and was buried in All Saints, Derby, 24 June 1794;
(2) Catherine Juliana Bateman (1797-1848), baptised at Ilam (Staffs), 23 February 1797; married, 14 February 1815 at St Swithin, Walcot, Bath (Som.), Sir Edward Dolman Scott (1793-1852), 2nd bt., of Great Barr (Staffs) (who m2, 1848, Lydia Gisborne), and had issue three sons; her eldest son succeeded at birth to his grandfather's baronetcy, as 2nd baronet, and later also succeeeded his father as 3rd baronet of Great Barr; buried at Great Barr, 10 August 1848;
(3) Amelia Anne Bateman (1798-1883), baptised at Ilam, 10 November 1798; married, 3 August 1815 at Dawlish (Devon), Sir Alexander Hood (1793-1851), 2nd bt., of Butleigh Wootton (Som.), and had issue two sons and one daughter; died 31 January 1883; will proved 28 April 1883 (effects £28,151);
(4) Mary Georgiana Bateman (1800-05), born 14 April and baptised at Ilam, 27 September 1800; died young, and was buried at All Saints, Derby, 31 August 1805.
He succeeded to the estates at Hartington and Morley and to the family property in Derby, including St Mary's Gate House, on his grandfather's death in 1777. He sold St. Mary's Gate House in about 1800. At his death his other estates passed to his nephews, Richard Thomas Bateman (1794-1853) and Thomas Osborne Bateman (1809-74).
He died at Bath (Som.), 28 January, and was buried in the family vault at All Saints, Derby, 7 February 1824; his will was proved 28 May 1824. His widow died in Bath and was buried in Bath Abbey burial ground, 13 March 1857; her will was proved in the PCC, 28 March 1857.
* But no record of a call to the bar has been traced.

Bateman, Richard (1757-1821). Second son of Richard Bateman (1719-62) and his second wife, Catherine, daughter of William Fitzherbert of Tissington (Derbys), born 13 March and was baptised at All Saints, Derby, 23 March 1757. Educated at Derby School, University College, Oxford (matriculated 1774) and Lincolns Inn (admitted 1777; called 1783). Barrister-at-law. JP and DL for Derbyshire and Staffordshire; High Sheriff of Derbyshire, 1812-13. He married, 12 October 1791 at Uttoxeter (Staffs), Elizabeth (1768-1857), only child and heiress of Rev. Thomas Keelinge of Uttoxeter, and had issue:
(1) Joyce Osborne Bateman (1793-1808), baptised at All Saints, Derby, 10 May 1793; died young, 13 May and was buried at Uttoxeter (Staffs), 18 May 1808;
(2) Richard Thomas Bateman (1794-1853) (q.v.);
(3) Mary Elizabeth Bateman (1796-1830), born 19 April 1796; married, 20 March 1829 at St Swithin, Walcot, Bath (Som.), Rev. James Hamilton John Chichester (1798-1884) of Arlington (Devon), and had issue one son; died following childbirth, 9 April 1830;
(4) Eliza Katherine Bateman (1797-1819), baptised at All Saints, Derby, 15 October 1797; died unmarried, 20 May and was buried at All Saints, Derby, 25 May 1819; administration of her goods was granted to her brother John, 12 January 1859 (effects under £800);
(5) Rev. John Bateman (1800-82), born 10 February 1800; educated at St John's College, Cambridge (matriculated 1818; BA 1822; MA 1826); ordained deacon, 1826 and priest, 1827; rector of East and West Leake (Notts), 1836-82 and Dean of Hartington (Derbys), 1852-82; married, 22 January 1828 at St Mary, Bryanston Sq., London, Emily (d. 1855), daughter of Edward Shewell of Bryanston Sq., and had issue seven sons and four daughters; died 2 May 1882; will proved 1 June 1882 (effects £16,586);
(6) Fitzherbert Bateman (b. & d. 1801), born 26 May and baptised at St Peter, Derby, 29 May 1801; died in infancy, 3 September and was buried at All Saints, Derby, 6 September 1801;
(7) James Sacheverell Alleyne Bateman (1803-83), born 10 December and was baptised at St Peter, Derby, 12 December 1805; an officer in the 85th Foot (Ensign, 1823; retired 1825); DL for Derbyshire; he and his brother Osborne built Litchurch Villa, 241 Osmaston Rd., Derby, c.1830 and he lived there until his mother's death; a considerable eccentric, at least in dress and manners, who lived latterly at the Midland Hotel, Derby; died unmarried, 21 January, and was buried at the New Cemetery, Derby, 25 January 1883;
(8) Thomas Osborne Bateman (1809-74) (q.v.);
(9) Hugh Athelstan Bateman (1810-26), born 18 November 1810; died young, 19 April and was buried at All Saints, Derby, 26 April 1826.
He lived at 36 St Mary Gate, Derby (owned by the Bateman family) and later at Foston Hall (Derbys) and Wheat Hill House (later Farm) near Mackworth (Derbys), both of which he leased.
He died 29 March and was buried in All Saints, Derby (now the Cathedral), 5 April 1821, where he is commemorated by a monument; his will was proved in the PCC, 28 June 1821. His widow died at Litchurch Villa, 23 May, and was buried at Uttoxeter, 29 May 1857; her will was proved in the PCC, 9 June 1857.

Bateman, Richard Thomas (1794-1853). Eldest son of Richard Bateman (1757-1821) and his wife Elizabeth, only child and heiress of Rev. Thomas Keelinge of Uttoxeter (Staffs), baptised at All Saints, Derby, 8 September 1794. An officer in the Derbyshire militia (Capt., 1810); DL for Derbyshire (from 1832); JP for Bath and Somerset, 1836; Commissioner of Land and Assessed Taxes for Somerset, 1838. He appears to have been a Roman Catholic convert, but his wife was born into that faith. He married, 2 June 1820 at Bathwick (Som.), Maria Magdalena (1802-52), daughter of Robert Willoughby of Clifton, Bristol (Glos) and Kingsbury Cliff (Warks), and had issue:
(1) Mary Bateman (1821-34), born 18 July and baptised at Bradford-on-Avon (Wilts), 25 July 1821; died young, 22 March 1834;
(2) Elizabeth Bateman (1822-84), born 23 September and baptised at Bradford-on-Avon, 5 October 1822; Franciscan nun in Roman Catholic convent at Taunton by 1851; died unmarried, 16 March 1884;
(3) Hugh Willoughby Bateman (1823-60) (q.v.);
(4) Richard Bateman (1824-25?), born 9 October and baptised at Bradford-on-Avon, 11 October 1824; said to have died in infancy in December 1825;
(5) John Willoughby Bateman (1825-52), baptised at Bradford-on-Avon, 20 October 1825; officer in 51st Regiment (Ensign, 1845; Lt., 1849); died of cholera at Rangoon (Burma), 22 April 1852;
(6) Francis Anthony Bateman (1828-57), born 29 January 1828; died of sunstroke while bathing at Teignmouth (Devon), 22 August 1857;
(7) Madeleine Josephine Bateman (1829-45), born 21 April 1829; died unmarried of consumption, 19 December 1845;
(8) Thomas Keelinge Bateman (1831-87) (q.v.);
(9) Maria Constance Bateman (1833-1911), born 28 November 1833; married, 31 July 1858 at St John's R.C. chapel, Bath, as his second wife, Samuel John Moorat (1814-91) and had issue eight children; died in Liverpool, 19 July 1911; will proved 28 September 1911 (estate £8,271);
(10) Agnes Mary Bateman (1835-83), born 8 November 1835; died unmarried, 15 April 1883 and was buried in Bath Roman Catholic cemetery; will proved 28 May 1883 (effects £4,187);
(11) Charles Keelinge Bateman (b. & d. 1837), born 20 May 1837; died in infancy, 28 July 1837;
(12) Austin Ferrers (k/a John) Bateman (1838-1917), of Helmsley (Yorks), born 4 September 1838; educated at Oscott and Prior Park; on staff of Ampleforth College from 1857; married, Jul-Sept 1866, Mary A. Emmerson (1832-1901), but had no issue; died 20 December and was buried in the monks' cemetery at Ampleforth, 22 December 1917; will proved 19 February 1918 (estate £901);
(13) Hester Mary Josephine Bateman (1840-1906), born 27 December 1840; a Benedictine nun at St Mary's Abbey, Colwich (Staffs); died Apr-June 1906;
(14) William Joseph Bateman (1843-69), born 16 May 1843; farmer at East Clandon (Surrey); married, Jan-Mar 1868, Anne Frances Freeman, but had no issue; died 31 May 1869 and was buried in the Roman Catholic cemetery at Bath; administration of goods granted to his widow, 19 August 1869 (effects under £800).
He inherited the Hartington and Morley estates in Derbyshire from his uncle, Sir Hugh Bateman, in 1824. He lived at Cumberwell House near Bradford-on-Avon (Wilts) and later at Hillgrove near Wells (Som.), and also had a house in St James' Square, Bath.
He died 18 June 1853; his will was proved in the PCC, 8 September 1853. His wife died 7 January 1852.

Bateman, Hugh Willoughby (1823-60). Eldest son of Richard Thomas Bateman (1794-1853) and his wife Magdalena, daughter of Robert Willoughby of Cliffe (Warks), born 11 September 1823 and baptised at Bradford-on-Avon (Wilts) the same day. He was unmarried and without issue.
He inherited the Hartington, Morley and Stanley estates from his father in 1853, but sold Hartington to the Duke of Devonshire in the same year. He lived at 33 Pulteney St., Bath.
He died 24 February 1860 and was buried in the Roman Catholic cemetery at Bath (Som.); his will was proved 5 April 1861 (effects under £8,000).

Bateman, Thomas Keelinge (1831-87). Fifth son of Richard Thomas Bateman (1794-1853) and his wife Magdalena, daughter of Robert Willoughby of Cliffe (Warks), born 1 August 1831. An officer in the 2nd Somerset Regiment of Militia (Lt., 1860; Capt. 1861; resigned 1862) and the Derby militia (Capt., 1862; Maj., 1873). He married, 15 September 1859 at St Mary, Weymouth (Dorset) and the RC Chapel, Weymouth, Georgiana (d. 1883), daughter of Frederick Bannatyne of Bath, and had issue:
(1) Hugh Alleyne Sacheverell Bateman (1860-96) (q.v.).
He lived at Smalley and later at St Mary's Gate, Derby and Alvaston House. He inherited the Morley estate either from his father in 1853 or his elder brother in 1860.
He died at Alvaston (Derbys), 2 March 1887 and was buried at Bath R.C. Cemetery; his will was proved 19 April 1887 (effects £4,262). His wife died at Etwall Lodge, 21 June 1883, and was buried at Bath Roman Catholic Cemetery.

Bateman, Hugh Alleyne Sacheverell (1860-96). Only son of Thomas Keelinge Bateman (1831-87) and his wife Georgiana, daughter of Frederick Bannatyne, born in Bath (Som.), 31 August 1860. An officer in the Kings Own Staffordshire Rifle Militia (Lt.; retired 1884). He married, 7 June 1888 at St James, Piccadilly, Westminster (Middx), Anna (1867-1947), daughter of Edward Bridges of Thorngrove, Gillingham (Dorset), but had no issue.
He lived at Etwall Lodge. He inherited the Morley estate from his father in 1887 and built Morley Manor from 1894-99, but died before it was finished, the house being completed by his widow.
He died whilst hunting at Overton Hall, Ashover (Derbys), 26 October and was buried (with a Roman Catholic rite) at Morley, 31 October 1896; his will was proved 25 January 1897 (effects £84,117). His widow married 2nd, 16 October 1913 at All Saints, Margaret St., St. Marylebone (Middx), Cmdr. Russell Lister-Kaye (1887-1960) (who in turn m2, 1948, Katherine S. Pilkington (1905-80)), and died in 1947.

Bateman, Thomas Osborne (1809-74). Fifth son of Richard Bateman (1757-1821) and his wife Elizabeth, only child and heiress of Rev. Thomas Keelinge of Uttoxeter (Staffs), born at Foston (Derbys), 1 March and baptised at Scropton (Derbys), 5 March 1809. As a child of eight, a double portrait of him and his younger brother was painted by the artist, Thomas Barber. Educated at Harrow, St John's College, Cambridge (matriculated 1827; BA 1833) and Lincolns Inn (admitted 1827). Deputy Chairman of the Derby & Crewe Junction Railway, 1845. JP (from the 1840s) and DL (from 1855) for Derbyshire. In old age, he became somewhat eccentric and inclined in pick quarrels with his relatives and fellow magistrates. In the 1870s, he engaged in a feud with the Chief Constable of Derbyshire and attempted to secure his dismissal from office, but the ultimate result was his own removal from office as a JP in 1872 at the direction of the Lord Chancellor. He met his wife while travelling on the Continent and married, 1 October 1857 at St James, Piccadilly, Westminster (Middx), Fanny Hanham (1824-1904), an accomplished amateur singer, daughter of William Lawrence Bicknell, solicitor, and had issue:
(1) Frederick Osborne Fitzherbert Bateman (1859-1917) (q.v.).
He rented Chaddesden Moor from Sir Henry Wilmot, 1845-63; he then moved to Litchurch Villa, Derby (which he and his brother Sacheverel owned) until 1865; he tried to sell it from 1866 and finally got it away in 1869. In 1857 he repurchased the family seat of Hartington Hall from the Duke of Devonshire, and after he remodelled it, he moved there, although works continued until 1866. He also inherited part of the Morley estate and built a new centre for this property at Breadsall Mount in 1863. His widow lived at Breadsall Mount until her last years, when she moved into a small house in Derby.
He died 14 January and was buried at Breadsall, 19 January 1874; his will was proved 23 February 1874 (effects under £25,000). His widow died 26 December 1904; her will was proved 25 February 1905 (estate £770).

Bateman, Frederick Osborne Fitzherbert (1859-1917), Only son of Thomas Osborne Bateman (1809-74) and his wife Fanny Hanham, daughter of William Lawrence Bicknell, born 12 November and baptised at Chaddesden, 11 December 1859. Educated at Trinity College, Oxford (matriculated 1878) and Inner Temple (admitted 1881). JP for Derbyshire. He married, 14 October 1886 at St Martin, Scarborough (Yorks NR). Evelyn Mary (1862-1945), daughter of Maj. Robert Wharton Wilkinson of Scarborough, and had issue:
(1) Osborne Robert Sacheverel Bateman (1887-1970) (q.v.);
(2) Mary Joyce Bateman (1889-1970); married, 9 December 1908, Francis Evelyn Fitzherbert Wright (1882-1944) of Lady Hole, Ashbourne (Derbys), youngest son of Fitzherbert Wright of The Hayes (Derbys), and had issue two sons; died 24 August 1970; will proved 5 January 1971 (estate £39,991);
(3) Evelyn Elizabeth Bateman (1892-1968), born 22 January and baptised at Breadsall, 17 February 1892; married, Apr-Jun 1924 (div.), Arthur McNeill Farquhar (1894-1964), but had no issue; died at Cookham Dean (Berks), 26 August 1968.
He inherited Hartington Hall and Breadsall Mount from his father in 1874 and came of age in 1880. Hartington was let c.1900-10, but in 1907 he sold Breadsall Mount to Joseph Hill and used the proceeds to modernise Hartington in 1910-11, when he returned to live there. His widow lived  latterly at Fairfield House, Quarndon (Derbys).
He died of pneumonia, 13 April 1917 and was buried at Hartington; his will was proved 3 November 1917 (estate £23,226). His widow died 31 July 1945; her will was proved in April 1946 (estate £11,990).

Bateman, Osborne Robert Sacheverel (1887-1970). Only son of Frederick Osborne Fitzherbert Bateman (1859-1917) and his wife Evelyn Mary, daughter of Maj. R.W. Wilkinson of Scarborough (Yorks NR), born 5 September and baptised 13 October 1887. Educated at The Grange School, Hoddesdon (Herts). Chartered accountant in Singapore. President of the Tanglin Club, Singapore, 1936-37. He and his wife were interned by the Japanese in Changi jail for several years after the fall of Singapore, and his wife used her talent as an artist to record camp life in images now held at the Changi museum. He married, 17 August 1916 (div. by 1947), Mary Angela (1881-1961), art teacher and artist, daughter of H.H. Pasea of Trinidad, and issue:
(1) Sacheverell Osborne Fitzherbert Bateman (1917-96), born in Singapore, 25 October 1917; solicitor; lived at Mortham Tower, Barnard Castle (Co. Durham); married, 14 August 1947 at St Mary, North Audley St., Mayfair, London, Amy Kathleen (1920-2000), daughter of Henry Urwick Goodbody of Paterson, New Jersey (USA), lawyer and later farmer in Scotland, and had issue two daughters; died 29 February 1996; will proved 2 October 1996;
(2) Elizabeth Bateman (b. 1918), born 20 November 1918; living in 1936 and perhaps emigrated to Australia;
(3) Anthony Hugh Bateman (1921-22); died 22 October 1922 and was buried at Bidadari, Singapore; commemorated by a monument at Hartington.
He inherited Hartington Hall from his father in 1917, subject to his mother's life interest. Hartington Hall was let to the Youth Hostels Association from 1934 and he sold them the freehold in 1948.
He died at Walberswick (Suffk), 2 September 1970; his will was proved 18 January 1971 (estate £20,594). His wife died 13 October 1961; her will was proved 12 December 1961 (estate £10,701).


Principal sources

Burke's Landed Gentry, 1894, vol. 1, pp. 107-108; Burke's Landed Gentry, 1898, vol 1, pp. 81-82; Burke's Landed Gentry, 1925, p. 97; M. Craven, The Derby town house, 1987, pp. 97-99, 111-13; M. Craven & M. Stanley, The Derbyshire country house, 2001, pp. 113, 287, 291-93; C. Hartwell, Sir N. Pevsner and E. Williamson, The buildings of England: Derbyshire, 3rd edn., 2016, pp. 438, 521, 529;

Location of archives

Bateman family of Hartington Hall: deeds, estate and family papers, 1598-1875 [Collection held privately; enquiries to Derbyshire Record Office]

Coat of arms

Bateman of Hartington Hall: Or, three crescents, with an estoile of six points above each crescent, gules; a canton azure.

Can you help?

  • Does anyone know why Sir Hugh Bateman (1756-1824) was given a baronetcy? At this date, they were usually a reward for political, civil or military service but none of these seems to apply in his case.
  • Can anyone supply a good quality image of St Mary's Gate House, Derby, which was repurposed as Derby Baptist Chapel in the 19th century and demolished in 1938?
  • Does anyone have further information about the ownership of Morley Manor since its sale in 1938?
  • I should be most grateful if anyone can provide photographs or portraits of people whose names appear in bold above, and who are not already illustrated. 
  • Any additions or corrections to the text above will be gratefully received and incorporated. I am always particularly pleased to hear from descendants of the family who can supply information from their own research for inclusion.

Revision and acknowledgements

This post was first published 12 January 2021.


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